Is Winning Really Losing?

By Jeff Price

We get hit up by a lot of people and companies asking us to promote “Battle of the Band” contests to TuneCore Artists.  The “winners” receives the grand prize of getting signed.

And I have to tell you, 99.9% of time, I pass on the opportunity, I just don’t feel right marketing and promoting a contest to artist that has the “winner” assign or give up rights and/or ownership of their copyrights to another entity.  I’m not so sure that’s “winning.”

On the other hand, I have always tried to be neutral in regards to opportunities­– who am I to tell artists what they should or should not do.  I certainly have my opinions (the themes of which always revolve around the music industry being transparent, honest and fair), but I believe TuneCore should provide information to educate.  Artists, armed with this knowledge and information, can then pick and choose what they want to do.

So I ask you, what do you think?   Should TuneCore market and promote more of these “Battle of the Band” type contests to its artists?  Where should the line be?  Should there be pre-set criteria allowing some through or should we keep it as is?

We want to know what you think.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=644075588 Andrew Sutton

    Battle of the Band = popularity contest.  The band with the most friends wins.  not the most fans, not the most people who like music.  I’ve seen people drag their entire family to a battle of the bands so they could “win” and often times the “winner” is the worst band; the one that has NO chance of actually selling albums outside of their friends and family. 

    • http://www.therealmusician.com Andrew

      I completely Agree with you Andrew. I recently did a Battle of the Bands, and that was entirely the case. Heck, the judges weren’t qualified to judge a contest like that at all! One of the judges was a photographer…

      …to judge a music contest…

      Stop and think about that for a minute, and try and tell me how that makes any bloody sense whatsoever…

    • http://www.therealmusician.com Andrew

      I completely Agree with you Andrew. I recently did a Battle of the Bands, and that was entirely the case. Heck, the judges weren’t qualified to judge a contest like that at all! One of the judges was a photographer…

      …to judge a music contest…

      Stop and think about that for a minute, and try and tell me how that makes any bloody sense whatsoever…

  • Henry Soul

    I don’t know! Because I’ve never won anything, and don’t expect 2 enter 2 win either – probably my ultimate distrust of authority and cronyism. But I know how 2 win fans, 1 @ a time.
    Henry Soul.
    http://www.flavors.me/henrysoul

  • http://www.facebook.com/briannott Brian Nott

    Battle of the Band = popularity contest, I agree 100% with Andrew. I’ve entered those before, but it’s no contest. $$$ backed artists always win.

  • yves maxime augustave

    allall our songs there are originaly from us  lightpowerband,limye ginen
    yves maxime augustave;monymax the writer

  • Chunkz

    No they dont mean crap, they are set up by some Snake who reaps the benefits of the tickets sold. He then leads the bands to the finals (based on how many ticket sales they can get.) The more money the snake makes the happier he is. There is no judgement of musical talent, skill, and stage presentation.. Don’t enter these SCAMS they will disappoint you, unless you bring the crowd. If you dont some cheese band (with no talent) and a lot of friends will win, and make you wonder why your band sucks…..when it doesn’t!  

    • madguitarist

      Exactly. I fronted a band where I played and sang Satriani’s “Big Bad Moon” song. I played slide, rhythm, harmonica and sang the very difficult song note for note but we didn’t have many friends come to the battle of the bands. Some kid thrash band won because they brought a lot of friends and all the promoter cared about were tickets sold. Admittedly the kids band wasn’t bad but absolutely nothing spectacular. I was really pissed that we didn’t win. Later, the same promoter had another BOB but he wanted each member of the bands to pay an entry fee. I refused to pay to play but the other guys in the band had an idea that we’d do it for fun because there was a new rule that the bands couldn’t use obscenities. In retrospect, I’m kicking myself for not participating because I missed a golden opportunity to use every obscenity in the book. It would’ve been worth the 15 bucks to lose that one.

  • http://www.tunecore.com/music/markbrogers Mark B Rogers

    I have not performed in battle of the bands myself, but I have played other roles in them.  Depending on the scale of it, it would seem possible to pick up a handful of new local fans while performing at this type of event and there can be some small benefits to the process.  I don’t have a particular interest in them myself.  Whether or not the “grand prize” is all that grand or not I suppose would be up to the artist but there should definitely be some sort of criteria to be met so people are barraged with “Hey, we got this battle of the bands over at Fred’s house on Saturday.  I know a guy that has a nice home stereo we can run sound through…”

  • MrsJoneyPos

    I’m pretty active in both music and film- my band has been recruited for a couple indie soundtracks and has submitted to and competed in a couple of the larger contests. I’ve also recruited bands for a couple of my films. It always irks me when bands- or the industry people they listen to- feel they’re too good to give away a song or two for a soundtrack. Sure, if you’re making a living playing music, if you already have an audience, then go ahead, demand money or walk away. But if you’re nobody, if you don’t have an audience, and you don’t have a label, or a manager, or even a long-term plan, why wouldn’t you give a song away, or enter a contest or whatever? The worst that could happen is the song gains you a few more fans. Maybe it blows up? Guess what, that contest just did more for you than you’ve ever done for yourself, and all it cost you was one song. There are literally a million musicians on tunecore right now? Maybe more? To me, it seems deeply irresponsible to preach to them, “turn down the opportunity for exposure, because the cost of giving away one song is too high.” One song of how many? If you’ve written/recorded three songs, you don’t have a career, so who cares. If you’ve written/recorded twenty songs, how much does giving away one free song cost you? However, I will say, I’m glad terrible advice like that reduces the amount of competition we face when submitting to contests or trying to get on soundtracks. I just picture a lot of stubborn, clueless musicians sitting in their apartments calling these contests “bullshit” or refusing to give a song away while opportunity after opportunity passes them by. They’ll probably still be there while we’re out building our audience through gigs, contests, soundtracks and social media… and of course, through the occasional free song. 

    • Stephan

      The “cost of giving away one song” could be astronomical if its a great song. Besides, why should ANY artist have to pay the promoter when the promoter is the only one making money off the deal right from the get-go? Makes no sense to me. Aren’t there already enough bloodsuckers in the music industry? Why encourage more to join in the feeding frenzy courtesy the actual TALENT?

    • Stephan

      The “cost of giving away one song” could be astronomical if its a great song. Besides, why should ANY artist have to pay the promoter when the promoter is the only one making money off the deal right from the get-go? Makes no sense to me. Aren’t there already enough bloodsuckers in the music industry? Why encourage more to join in the feeding frenzy courtesy the actual TALENT?

      • Mrsanoncomm

        Three examples from one film I participated in: we gave away two songs. Someone else gave away two songs. Someone else gave away one song. Soundtrack was then given away for free (gasp). 25,000 people downloaded the soundtrack, from around the country. My tunecore income monthly almost tripled. Then the producers recommended me for a scoring gig, which I got, that paid my way for six months. The other girl who gave away two songs is now scoring their next film, paid. The guys who gave away one song were sent by the producers to a special audition arranged by producers for music placement friends of theirs, and band got national commercial. Why did this good fortune befall us? Not because we were too-proud douchebags who couldn’t see the value in promotion, but because we gave away 1/30th of our catalog (two songs of our 60) for free. Low cost to us, huge return. 

        • Trister Keane

          When you say “giving away a song” do you mean waiving your fee for using the song in the movie or literally giving all rights to the song to the producers, so that they now own the copyright and you no longer do? If the former it’s a no brainer, of course you would do that for the exposure. If the latter it’s abusive and no artist should ever do so.
          Your argument would be more compelling (read that as believable) if you would pony up the name of these movies and artists and songs – otherwise I call shenanagins.

          • Nonamemaddox

            If I may…I think that where the confusion and/or controversy may lie is in the idea that “giving away” a song is the Artist waving goodbye to their beloved invention forever. This may not necessarily be the case. You can license your song to someone for them to use for awhile without giving up your copyrights and such. Just don’t sign on the dotted line, read the contract. Negotiate. If they get your song forever, you then have to weigh the consequences. Like MrsJoneyPos said, if you have only 3 songs (and that’s ALL you will ever have), you don’t have much of a career brewing anyway. You can either maintain your deathgrip on your tune and only show it to your relatives or your 100 loyal fans on open mic night, or you can send it out into the big, cruel world for some real chance of success or failure. I guess you have to ask yourself if you are willing and gutsy enough to take that chance. If your song does well and sells a bunch, great! Take your other two masterpieces and sell them on your terms now that people have heard of you! Ya gotta sow before you can reap. Am I wrong here?

          • Trister Keane

            Yes, you are wrong. The one thing you must never do is give up all rights to anything you create, song, short story what have you. License it for free if you must, for a single movie or show as you are getting started. I know guys who are still being paid for songs thay wrote 40 years ago. Anyone who asks you to give up all rights is looking to rip you off, plain and simple.
            “Look, just give us that one song and you’ll get rich selling all the others, I mean you can write more like “In a Big Country” can’t you? Sure you can!
            See also: How to give away a million dollars in your spare time.

        • Margimo

          still completely unrelated, did you read the article?

        • Stephan

          “Not because we were too-proud douchebags who couldn’t see the value in promotion…”

          People capable of describing the creators of the music potentially chosen for “promotion” as “too-proud douch-bags” isn’t a creator, no matter how loudly they blow their own horn. They’re hucksters and con-men looking for a free lunch.

          Any music worthy of being added to a movie’s soundtrack is worth paying for. Period. Whether you pay up front for it or pay over time.

          No, people who trash talk like this are Promoter-types – hoping to take advantage of the naivety of creative people eager to have their art appreciated in order to steal the monetary value of the legitimate artist’s work.

          Trister Keane has got you figured out too, I see…

      • ThisFlightTonight.com

        Book your own shows, gather a community of bands who all help out, create a booking system, say bands pay $40 deposit to play, they get deposit back at the end of the gig if they show up, if not deposit is not refundable – filters the slackers. Then share door takes, get all band members to help out, door person, sound guy… then you got a winning formula! I made this up, its working for us at home…

        Ralph
        http://www.thisflighttonight.com
        http://www.facebook.com/thisflighttonight

    • Stephan

      The “cost of giving away one song” could be astronomical if its a great song. Besides, why should ANY artist have to pay the promoter when the promoter is the only one making money off the deal right from the get-go? Makes no sense to me. Aren’t there already enough bloodsuckers in the music industry? Why encourage more to join in the feeding frenzy courtesy the actual TALENT?

    • margimo

      playing a battle of the bands is completely different from giving away a song to a film. We’ve been on a few soundtracks, it is always a good thing, always good exposure. playing on a BOTB show with a ten band line up of 3 songs each when most of the bands are shit and then trying to get your fans to pay £8/9 a ticket to watch it will have a negative effect on the reputation of your band, as if you are good, then why are you playing shows like that?! Also, most BOTB’s don’t involved giving away a song, what you’re annoyed about is almost completely unrelated.

    • B Manage

      I am the business manager of a very popular up an coming band in San Diego. Who goes to work for free? You probably know how much it cost to record an album yet people want Starving Artists to give away their hard work!!! The problem is the snakes out there who have the money to pay for a song and yet take advantage of desperate bands! If everyone stuck together and didn’t cave in and gave away their songs then “they” (the snakes out there) would have to pay if they want a song! I’m not saying new groups should receive thousands of dollars for a song but at least enough to compensate for their cost! It seems to me that the Musicians are at the bottom of the totem pole when it comes to making money and yet without them there would be no music!!!

  • http://ethanfreckletonmusic.com Ethan Freckleton

    These contests only benefit the entity holding the contest. Usually designed to drive traffic and likes to their own products – artists provide the contest holders a service by bringing their fans/contacts to their site (for free). If TuneCore starts promoting these I would probably start sending TuneCore emails to my Spam folder.

  • http://www.facebook.com/MattTLeeUK Matthew Lee

    Me and My Band “The Simon Pollard Band” just won a spot at Reading and Leeds Festival on the BBC Introducing Stage because of winning a Battle of the Bands so I think Battle of the Bands are great as long as you enter the right ones. This particular contest was based on audience numbers as well as a panel of Industry Judges just to let you know.  

  • Josh P

    I participated in a BOTBs about ten years ago where the top prize was free studio time. Awesome, right? When we spoke to the winners later on it turned out it to be free karaoke studio time….LOL. Read the fine print, I guess.

  • JennyJeanLove

    I have to agree that most of the time “Winning” is really “Losing” when it comes to competitions. I through the years I have experienced competitions (even at the college level) that have individuals already picked out to win, because they are friends of the “judges.”

  • Harry Broker, (aquablauw)

    Everyone has a choice to make. They knew what the rules were. They won, so they were bonded on rules and regulations to the owners of that contest! I don’t believe in contests, I let my worldwide fans do the picking and choosing for me. Just Google Search, aquablauw, and see for yourself!  Anyone joining any such contests, should read the rules and regulations first! Contests folks are usually after your money anyways. Then you got the thieves, such as Deka Records, Ilumina Records and http://www.taxi.com. Watch them all!

    Best Regards,

    Harry Broker
    A&R Executive for, “Crystal Clear Records”.

    http://reverbnation.com/aquablauw

  • Rock Dude

    All of the comments are JUST as I suspected. I’ve always said “true artists” never seem to go out for “American Idol”, and “true artists” seem to be prevalent in the Tunecore following. It’s not a judgment for or against, I just knew that the typical “true artist” would never be in a battle of the bands, it’s just NOT their thing! Just like “American Idol” seems to be mainly (and there are exceptions to everything) for people whom would otherwise never attempt a career in music. 

  • Ohgeeze

    Are there any bands today that make a goos respectable living after winning one of these battle of the bands?

  • http://www.jteasymusic.com JT Easy

    ‘Battle of the bands’ are an indignity to artists, as are most ‘songwriting contests’. I have been on the inside of several, and it’s pretty cynical. Art is not a contest. It’s an expression of your soul. Sometimes it will be useful to others, and sometimes it will not. Either way, it’s worth doing and will be very useful to you. If you hone your skills and follow your muse, and share your art as much and as freely as possible, and (most importantly) ignore what other musicians and especially the industry, says about what you should be doing, you will be successful in your own perfect way. It’s not a contest- don’t lose your soul.

    • Wilsper FS7

      I agree with JT! Art It’s not a sport! Winning or Loosing means bulls__t in Art.

  • Mark

    My experience, despite having won a couple of these in past times, is that they are mostly popularity contests & prey on the hopes & dreams of bands both good & bad trying to negotiate the sea of mediocrity we all struggle in (& I don’t necessarily mean musical mediocrity but that of the industry itself & many of  those who run it). In the same way songwriting comps are mostly run by parasites who make a heap of dosh out of the thousands of aspiring (& established) writers who enter. I quit that game after entering the same 4 songs from a new album in half a dozen major comps- one song reached the finals of the ISC in the Americana category & did absolutely zip elsewhere, the others fared similarly. BTW a friend of mine won the ISC in the same category the previous year- he said it was largely pointless. It’s all so subjective- was it Duke Ellington who said “There are two kinds of music- good music & bad music”? After the better part of 30 years at the sonic coal-face & at varying levels of obscurity, it has become apparent to me that the best reason to do anything is purely for the love of it, all the rest is bullshit. You know how good you are & how good it makes you feel- just get out there & do your best, let the cards fall where they may.

  • Mark

    My experience, despite having won a couple of these in past times, is that they are mostly popularity contests & prey on the hopes & dreams of bands both good & bad trying to negotiate the sea of mediocrity we all struggle in (& I don’t necessarily mean musical mediocrity but that of the industry itself & many of  those who run it). In the same way songwriting comps are mostly run by parasites who make a heap of dosh out of the thousands of aspiring (& established) writers who enter. I quit that game after entering the same 4 songs from a new album in half a dozen major comps- one song reached the finals of the ISC in the Americana category & did absolutely zip elsewhere, the others fared similarly. BTW a friend of mine won the ISC in the same category the previous year- he said it was largely pointless. It’s all so subjective- was it Duke Ellington who said “There are two kinds of music- good music & bad music”? After the better part of 30 years at the sonic coal-face & at varying levels of obscurity, it has become apparent to me that the best reason to do anything is purely for the love of it, all the rest is bullshit. You know how good you are & how good it makes you feel- just get out there & do your best, let the cards fall where they may.

  • Mark

    My experience, despite having won a couple of these in past times, is that they are mostly popularity contests & prey on the hopes & dreams of bands both good & bad trying to negotiate the sea of mediocrity we all struggle in (& I don’t necessarily mean musical mediocrity but that of the industry itself & many of  those who run it). In the same way songwriting comps are mostly run by parasites who make a heap of dosh out of the thousands of aspiring (& established) writers who enter. I quit that game after entering the same 4 songs from a new album in half a dozen major comps- one song reached the finals of the ISC in the Americana category & did absolutely zip elsewhere, the others fared similarly. BTW a friend of mine won the ISC in the same category the previous year- he said it was largely pointless. It’s all so subjective- was it Duke Ellington who said “There are two kinds of music- good music & bad music”? After the better part of 30 years at the sonic coal-face & at varying levels of obscurity, it has become apparent to me that the best reason to do anything is purely for the love of it, all the rest is bullshit. You know how good you are & how good it makes you feel- just get out there & do your best, let the cards fall where they may.

  • NashG

    Losing rights to your own song is one of the worst things one could do! Sadly, when these ads are out across, people do not read the fine prints or choose not to in lieu of winning and in a hope of making it big! These companies who organize such events, if doing for the betterment of struggling artists, should refrain from taking their copyrights! I feel sad that millions contesting lose their rights to their own songs for this purpose… 

    I sincerely thank TuneCore for binging it to their notice… 

  • http://www.facebook.com/jazzydave Dave Owens

    Short answer? No.

  • http://www.facebook.com/Giuliotherocker Giulio Michelon

    Usually Battle of the Bands are occasions for find bands who play for free in change of prices for just one of them. And the prices are usually inadeguate…

  • TheDimeStoreNovelist

    Depends who is presenting the competition. I’m currently 1 of 8 musicians in a competition for Rolling Stone Magazine called Street to Stage- http://www.rollingstone.com/sprintstreet The winner gets to play the Rolling Stone Rock Room during SXSW in Austin TX. No loss of rights, or label to be signed to. It’s great.

    -Charles Rangel

  • Gene Blank

    Winning something and earning something are two very different realms. A band can win a contest simply on how many friends they have voting for them, or if they have a hacker skilled friend helping out. But only a band with real talent and artistic integrity can earn its way to the top… So therefor, Battle of The Bands are usually empty incentives used by promoters to generate revenue through taking advantage of wannabe bands. I believe for the most part, you’ll never find a truly great artist/band taking part in a contest.

  • Seasidemessiah

    @8abc9136ec0e66d196428b25e4886755:disqus  – You are spot on. From the opening skirmish, battles of the bands have always been “battles of the fans”. They have no real bearing on the quality of the music or the skill of the players, it’s all about putting butts in the seats. Of course, that translates into ticket, merch, concession, parking, etc. income for the “snakes”.It’s interesting how the snakes try to disguise the concept, but shows like American Idol, America’s Got Talent, and the Presidential Election are simply vehicles for larger entities to gather information about the public for marketing-demographic purposes. Those companies have taken a simple talent competition to a whole new level and turned it into a data-mining tool. Today, it’s never about the talent, unless your talking about the ancient Greek meaning of Talent. TuneCore, please leave BOBs out of your otherwise valuable information. Thanks!!

  • President Fluid

    I have been in bands in the past that were judge by,  1. how many tickets your sell, 2. by popularity of the crowed, 3. and by official judges. The ones that I found that were most fare, is if  there is a judge panel, and the panel consists of hard working musicians, of professionals in the music industry. Because a judge panel like this is rare, I discluded all my bands from any battle contest for the past 15 years. I also disagree with an entry fee. Hard working bands should not have to pay the non-hard working consumers to play. If I were you, I would only promote battle of the bands if, 1. there is no band entry fee 2. judged by a pro judge panel.

  • Michael Nind

    They are all worth the effort and some self promotion deosnt go a miss. Did win one and was £250.00up.
    Mike Nind.

  • Rekathesaint

    Not to mention that these events are designed to generate revenue. None of which the artists see. Artists are inherently at the bottom of the barrel. Stop participating in this crap to add value to your service. It’s a joke. Same as open mics, etc. When 20 artists come bringing ten people each, who pay entry and buy drinks… somebody is making money. And 99.9% of the time it isn’t the artist.

  • http://www.vimeo.com/user6329478 Antoni Degutis

    Well Jeff, one thing is certain, if TuneCore won’t market this type of contests, those bands and solo artists who are interested in those contests or any kind of opportunity which might land them either a recording deal or TV appearance, or any kind of public exposure at all, will not open accounts with you, they’ll register their new accounts either with ReverbNation, StarNow, or whole bunch of other similar sites promising them fame and wealth. Honestly, if I knew about ReverbNation or StarNow a year ago, I would never singed with you. You see, you do nothing for your artists to promote them, you don’t even move your little pinkie in that direction. Guess how much I made from the worldwide sales of my single which I uploaded to TuneCore (of course there was fee involved) almost a year ago? I’ve made a staggering amount of $ 00.00 US, I’m rolling naked in those zeroes! I even wrote to you asking if you promote your artists in any way. You responded that you don’t, that I have to do it myself. Well, ReverbNation and StarNow offers never ending stream (e-mails/news letters) of various opportunities for those who want to make it big in the Showbizz. You want to act, to become a model, write movie soundtracks, form a band, join a band, go to international music summit and rub shoulders with industry sharks, or for that matter win the contest, and not only get $ 25-50.000 US for the first place, but a recording deal as well? If you do, then register with ReverbNation, StarNow or other sites like them. Sure, all this will cost you money. Entry fees, registration fees, upgrade (fee) to full membership, on top of that, you cover travel, food and accommodation expenses as well. BUT SO WHAT? Nobody forces anybody to do those things. Showbizz deals in DREAMS, and there are no guarantees in this department, only risks, especially for those artists who don’t have big names, or just started making first steps towards achieving their DREAMS. Dreams are necessary, life without a dream is not worth living, that’s my personal opinion. The bigger the DREAM, the more exciting life becomes. Now, I have a good advise to all those out there who keep whining and moaning how anybody tries to cheat them, steal from them, hustle them, how everyone doesn’t give a s..t about their art, either become a bum and live out of donations, or go to the woods, build a shack there, eat berries and roadkill, hug the trees and become one with Nature. You’ll be better off that way, here, in the real world, you’re either a predator with money, or a dreamer/prey without any.    
    Cheers to everyone!        

    • Anonymous

      @antoni

      forgive me for this, but as you are so aggressive with me, i am going to be aggressive back
      You are wrong. Either you are not aware of what we do or you are choosing to misrepresent the truth.
      You want proof – here are links to the screen shots of all the placements and features we have gotten TuneCore Artists in the past few months. http://blog.tunecore.com/2011/07/tunecore-artists-featured-in-digital-stores-july-2011.html http://blog.tunecore.com/2011/06/tunecore-artists-featured-in-digital-stores.html
      There is an entire department dedicated to marketing and promoting TuneCore Artists for features.
      And then on top of that there is another department committed to putting together brand deals for TuneCore Artists.
      The difference between TuneCore and other places is I wont try to trick artists into using TuneCore with snake-oil and false promises. Not everyone can get featured so why would I use that as a way to get bands to work with us? I wont ever promise something that cannot be delivered to all. I have a real problem with people paying money for the possibility of something. To me that’s a scam.
      But it’s our job and its what we do. And we have done it for over one thousand artists. Most recently we got a few featured as the Starbucks free download single of the week meaning they received national promotion in every starbucks.
      How many has ReverbNation gotten? How about StarNow?

      It’s TuneCore Artists that consistently get featured and top the iTunes and other charts. why? because we are the best in the world at what we do.
      Its your decision if you want to spend money for the hope of something, but to me that reeks of the old industry that screws musicians wherever they can.

      I just wont do it.

      Jeff

    • http://www.jteasymusic.com JT Easy

      Selling dreams to folks is generally good business, and the ones who do it can say, “well, they could have wasted their money on even worse crap”. It’s hard to get a record going even if it’s good, and with all the paid promo services that take anything with a budget, it’s got to be a minefield for programmers and sales outlets. The market is now a level playing field, and it is a sea of mediocre stuff. Since the labels have gone down (fine with me) there is no one to make qualitative calls on your stuff. You just release and promote as you are able, and hope the folks will hear it and like it. It’s a miracle even for a great tune to get attention in this ocean. Tune Corp does as good a job as anyone, and better than most. Everyone’s art is worthwhile, but I feel that if you want to make a living at it, you look at the quality of what you are putting into the world. It’s really the only thing you can control.

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_CKNVYD37C5OID26F4V4JGLSRPM CrypticS

      Dude, Reverb Nation is RARELY successful. Unless you feel like paying anywhere from $5-$50 to enter to be placed on some whacked out festival or open mic then it’s really not worth it. My guess is if you have money to blow like that, then you wouldn’t be on a site like Reverb Nation. Tunecore puts your recordings up for sale online for you. It’s as simple as that. They do offer other opportunities as well but it comes down to you. You can’t expect to hit it big by entering some freaking contest on Reverb Nation. Being successful in music takes a lot of hard work: touring, recording, promotion, etc. I feel like you’re blaming TuneCore for things that are ultimately up to you. TuneCore and other sites can help artists/bands out but in the end you it’s up to you to get out there, play everywhere you can, and work your ass off. Any band who has made it will tell you it took A LOT of work to get where they are. If it was as easy as someone signing up on a website and making money off their music, then everyone would be a musician. It’s not easy but you do it because you love it and can’t imagine doing anything else, not to make money. If that’s your goal, go be a fucking accountant.

  • Erik

    In my opinion, No! A contest of this type, is open for corruption, biasing. When a contest is based on fans votes it can be even worst, fans can be manipulated, and the popular choise not always represent the best act. Besides, how wants to be sucked up by a record label and give up your creation this days?

  • Scroticus28

    Please don’t polute Tunecore with so called “battle of the bands” As you stated in the rare event of a band being “signed” it’s usually a scam designed to rob a band of songs but most of the time they are only a marketing ploy to either sell more booze or sell a band studio time.
    My band won a competition for a one year house band contract at a very famous Nashville club on 2nd Ave, but when all was said and done there was no contract and it was a nightmare.
    Basically beware of any cometitions and use every opportunity so that you win without winning.

  • Michel

    Having to pay to enter the majority of the contests and give up your copyrights as well sounds like what ALL musicians are trying to get away from “pay to play” it’s more important to get frequency and exposure for your material than to be a contest winner !

  • Radioeris

    I can countenance doing a BOB as a lark.  But I’m not going to pay a fee for the privilege.  I understand the organizers of events need to make their money too, but if I’m going to be performing for free, and possibly traveling to the event on my dime, I’m not going to pay a fee to enter. 

  • ThisFlightTonight.com

    No, way too many of them, it would lose impact.

    Ralph
    http://www.thisflighttonight.com
    http://www.facebook.com/thisflighttonight

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_CKNVYD37C5OID26F4V4JGLSRPM CrypticS

    It’s things like this that are ruining the local scenes and preventing new bands from playing shows that will get them exposure. These “Battle of the Bands” contests are nothing more than a booking company who shells out cash up front to decent (and even shitty) venues and puts 10 bands on for one night regardless of what type of music they play. They don’t care if they have an acoustic act followed by a death metal band. As long as people sell the most tickets (and by sell tickets they mean sell a ticket to everyone and your damn grandma) they will win. No one wants to sit around for 8 hours watching 10 bands that are drastically different in style and quality. It’s a joke.

    They promise you with “studio time” and “showcases with label representatives.” It’s all empty promises and most of them are run by 10 people hundreds of miles away who have no idea about the music scene of the state you’re playing in let alone the venue. At least here in New Jersey, it used to be that maybe 3-5 bands would rent out a VFW hall for a show, sell tickets for $3 or $5 a piece, split the profits if there were any, and just have a good time. Now, booking companies “require” you to sell a certain amount of tickets at $10-$15 a piece (I’ve seen 5 national touring major label signed bands on one bill for $15 at a GOOD venue) promising you better shows, a great turn out at your show, etc. What ends up happening is new bands who are just starting out sell a large amount of tickets (usually the requirement is anywhere from 15 to 30 tickets) to friends/family/people who probably don’t care about the bands they’re seeing. Half the people are just supporting the people they know, the other half don’t show up, and in the end you have maybe 25 people who actually show up if you’re lucky there to see 10 bands…and they’re just waiting to see the people they know. It’s a complete scam and all an attempt to get money. Some of the booking companies who run battles have their own pathetic label of kids still in high school (and the dudes running it are near middle aged) who put out one single or EP if they’re lucky and are stuck signing away all their rights, playing crappy tours, and ultimately doing nothing.

    If in the end you end up playing a Battle of the Bands just play it like any other show. Screw selling as many tickets as you can, screw trying to get every person you know to come out and buy a ticket, and screw what the judges think. Why should there even be a competition in music? Why does everyone have to be better than someone else? Can’t we all just play music because we love it? Just play your set and take it at that because 9 times out of the 10 the people judging your band probably don’t know a thing about music and are in no position to be judging you. So please tunecore, keep these “vampire bookers” who feed on new and naive bands the hell out. Hell, it may even be worth writing a blog post about them. They’re destroying what’s left of local music scenes and preventing new bands that are talented from getting out there.

  • Dirtyrottensinnermusic

    Think about it. Battle of the Artists?  That just doesn’t even make sense.  Picaso vs. Monet to the DEATH!!!! 

  • Dajiemusicgroup

    One of the most well know consultant had a conversation with me and did not understand why you would promote indie artist to sell their music under one of the 4 major umbrellas.  That prevents other labels from offering them deals because they will think they are under a label already