SoundCheck: The Music Industry – Then vs. Now


  • pjodonnell

    “Clutter” has always been a issue – if there are more bands than your own out there vying for the attention of the media and consumers, you have to distinguish yourselves from them on a basis other than music (because no one has the time to listen to all of that music.)  In 1992 as in 2012, if you have a couple of thousand dollars, you could get your music available for sale; the difference was that in 1992, most people had an interest in paying for music.

  • http://twitter.com/zenoscillator zenoscillator

    well we know one thing for sure, there were more full time working professional class musicians a decade ago…

    http://thetrichordist.wordpress.com/2012/05/22/why-arent-more-musicians-working-professionally/

    • tunecore

      well thats simply a false statement. Linking to a blog article that is incorrect does not make it right
      heres the facts:

      In its hey day, (1999) Warner Music was releasing 1 release a day – that’s 365 releases a year
      Of those releases, about 200 or so were of “new” artists – the rest were re-issues, compilations etc
      of the 200 or so, 98% of the artists that released failed.

      that means 196 of the 200 failed. They were dropped and their careers were over.
      4 “succeeded” – and of the 4 that succeeded, perhaps one ever made a band royalty off of the recorded sales of music
      compare that with the new industry

      There are between 15,000 – 20,000 new recorded releases by about as many artists each month. Now add in entities like CD Baby etc and the number gets much much higher.
      Most make very little. However, many many more make more than they ever have before. As one example, in 2011, there were five artists that made over $1,000,000 via TuneCore in recorded music sales. Now add in publishing income, tour income, merch income etc
      The TuneCore customer base has sold over 600,000,000 units of music and earned over $300,000,000 in the past two years
      If the definition of “full time working professional class musicians” is “Signed artists on labels”, then yes, that number is lower.
      Where I think we are disconnecting is that to me is not the proper definition.

      There are more artists creating more music today than at any point in history

      And these artists are earning more money off the sale of recorded music than at any point in history

      In one year in old industry between all the labels (indies included), you may have had around 50 – 100 artists make “real” money that sustained them for some time.

      I can list that many each month

      From a sheer numbers perspective the statistics you are quoting are just wrong

      However, it is not possible for the majority of artists to “make a living” due to the uniqueness of talent and music

      jeff

  • Vkaymusic

    We all are selling music and sometimes do it for fun.music is more of a language than a career

  • NURREDIN

    Come to Vegas.There are Musicians working EVERY hotel EVERY night.