Try to Bring People Together

Last month bluegrass band The Infamous Stringdusters played an awesome CMJ show at Brooklyn Bowl to kick off their fall tour.  We got a chance to board their (parked) tour bus before the show, and ask them about touring, marketing and promotion, the financial struggles that often come with being an independent band, and a whole lot more.

Recently we’ve been featuring parts of the interview between TuneCore’s Chris Mooney and Andy Falco (guitar) and Travis Book (bass) of The Infamous Stringdusters.

This clip is all about creating and interacting with communities while on the road…

If you don’t have time to watch the clip, here are some of the key tips from the ‘Dusters:

1. Connect with fans outside. Spend a few days in a town where you’re performing and try to get fans to meet up for an outdoor activity.

2. Work with local non-profits, food organizations or local charities to bring awareness to your fans. Let your tour life be an extension of your home life.

3. It’s great for a band to try to pass some of what’s important to them on to their fans, but it’s a delicate balance. You may not want to come off as if you’re preaching your values.

4. Your job is to play music and through that, create an opportunity for people to get together for a shared experience.

#TCVideoFridays – November 30th 2012

We’re back with another edition of #TCVideoFridays! We’ll start out with a few music videos TuneCore distributed to iTunes…

Young Kato Break OutYoung Kato, “Break Out”

Dijon Talton Wild OutDijon Talton, “Wild Out”

Sarah Brightman AngelSarah Brightman, “Angel”

…and now a few more videos for your viewing pleasure.


Andy Allo, “People Pleaser”


The Midnight Beast, “The Return of the Boyband”


Jake Miller, “A Million Lives”


Apparatjik & Lowell, “Shake Him Off”


Bitter Ruin, “Child in a Seacave”


The Candle Thieves, “Weatherman”


Natalie Angiuli, “New Hands”


Casey Desmond, “Talking to God”

If You’ve Got a Back-Up Plan You’re Gonna Use It

Last month bluegrass band The Infamous Stringdusters played an awesome CMJ show at Brooklyn Bowl to kick off their fall tour.  We got a chance to board their (parked) tour bus before the show, and ask them about touring, marketing and promotion, the financial struggles that often come with being an independent band, and a whole lot more.

Recently we’ve been featuring parts of the interview between TuneCore’s Chris Mooney and Andy Falco (guitar) and Travis Book (bass) of The Infamous Stringdusters.

This clip is all about the financial side of being a musician.

If you don’t have time to watch the clip, here are some of the key points from the ‘Dusters:

1. You need to be all in, and let go of fear and security. If you’ve got a back-up plan you’re going to use it.

2. Being an artist can’t be thought of as a means to an end. You need to feel good about what you’re doing, day in and day out.

3. The odds of ‘making it’ as a musician may be slim, but being able to play music, visit beautiful places, and stay happy is a pretty rich life.

4. People often look forward to retirement so they can do what they really want to do. Musicians do that every day. That’s the payoff.

New Music Tuesday: Nov. 27, 2012

TuneCore Artists are releasing tons of new music every day. We’re featuring a few of those new releases below. Check them out!

TheSmithTapes
Collection #1- Fillmore East
The Smith Tapes
Vocal

Roksonix
The Dogfight EP
Roksonix
Dance

BogglesWorth
Pleasant Exhaust
BogglesWorth
Electronic

LeahFelder
California Christmas
Leah Felder
Pop

BitterRuin
The Rocket Sessions
Bitter Ruin
Alternative

ChrisAltmann
Nothing But Nice Things
Chris Altmann
Rock

CaseyDesmond
Déjà vu
Casey Desmond
Pop

FoxtailsBrigade
Time Is Passed
Foxtails Brigade
Rock

YoungGunner
Mudgrips and Moonshine EP
Young Gunner
Hip Hop/Rap

We Try to Make Fans for Life

Last month bluegrass band The Infamous Stringdusters played an awesome CMJ show at Brooklyn Bowl to kick off their fall tour.  We got a chance to board their (parked) tour bus before the show, and ask them about touring, marketing and promotion, the financial struggles that often come with being an independent band, and a whole lot more.

Over the next few weeks we’ll be featuring parts of the interview between TuneCore’s Chris Mooney and Andy Falco (guitar) and Travis Book (bass) of The Infamous Stringdusters.

This clip from the interview is all about connecting with fans, creating an experience, and using social media.

If you don’t have time to watch the clip, here are some of the key points from the ‘Dusters:

1. Try to make fans for life.  It can be more beneficial for bands to make fans who will come to festivals and participate because it has meaning for them, than to make fans who will buy one record.

2. The focus doesn’t need to be on selling records or t-shirts. It’s all about selling an experience, which can translate into selling tickets.

3. Social media acts as a direct line to a band, but there’s no substitution for face to face interaction. Personal connections can be the most positive.

4. In order to best connect with fans, bands should make themselves available on multiple channels. Having different channels for fan communication lets fans interact however they feel most comfortable.

*At the end of the clip, Andy and Travis mention that their live shows are archived on their site. Here’s the link: http://thestringdusters.com/site/archive/

 

The Rise of Independent Latin Music

If you’ve been following the TuneCore blog, you’ve probably noticed that we’ve been profiling some of the labels that use TuneCore for their digital distribution. Well, we’ve got one more interview for you, this time with Gil Gastelum, founder of Cosmica Artists & Records. Cosmica Artists & Records is an independent management and record company based in Los Angeles, that works with many Latin artists. Read the interview to learn how Cosmica selects its artists, how the Latin genre has grown over the years and more…

Can you describe your label – (genre, number of artists signed, how long you’ve been operating, etc…) ?
My label is the alternative to the alternative. That’s the best way I can describe it. I don’t follow any formula and I try to follow my musical heart as much as I can.

How did you get your label up and running?
In the beginning back in 2004, it was a joint venture between myself and my first artist David Garza (from Austin) and his family. We all scraped up our nickels to put together a 4 CD/1 DVD Box Set (!)

How do you choose the artists to work with?
If I hear a song and it immediately enters my consciousness I go from there. Some situations work and some don’t pan out, but usually it starts with the music. I know it’s not a very sexy answer, but if I’m going to pound the pavement for that artist I really need to believe in what I’m going to take my lumps for.

What does TuneCore provide for you as a label?
It provides valuable access to digital destinations like iTunes and Amazon—places that before 2006 were not available  to me unless I signed with a label or did a distribution deal.

How do you use the monthly sales information in your account?
I use the sales info to pay out royalties and gauge where sales are coming from.

Are the weekly trending reports in your account of value to you?
Yes, especially right after a release. They help me figure out if what we are doing up front before a release is working, as well as determine where I need to go to (DSP’s) to try to get editorial help.

When one of your artists has a new release coming out, what do you do to promote the release, and what do you expect the artist to do?
We put out press releases, promote on FB/Twitter/Tumblr social network platforms as a label and for the artist, still do old fashioned CD mailings and sending of digital links to press, and for limited promotions to the fans before the release.

How have you seen Latin music and Latin artists grow/change over the years you’ve been working in the music industry? 
The rise of the independent sector has never been more prevalent—it’s exciting.  You see other genres such as Regional Mexican Music being more of a factor and Latin Pop—even though it’s still the biggest thing out there, it does now have to thankfully share space with other Latin genres.

What are the most important tips you would give to a DIY artist trying to achieve his/her goals (whether it be getting signed to a label or not)?
Believe in yourself, take outside advice with a grain of salt, but never stop learning. Be persistent but not a pain in the butt. Go where the love is.


More on Cosmica Artists & Records @ cosmicaartists.tumblr.com

Check out some of the artists signed to Cosmica: Torreblanca, Carla Morrison, Sergio Mendoza Y La Orkesta, Sol Pereyra, Mariel Mariel, Madame Récamier