New Music Friday: April 21, 2017

TuneCore Artists are releasing tons of new music every day. Each week we check out the new TuneCore releases and choose a few at random to feature on the blog.

Is your hit next?

Follow Music Made Me – a Spotify playlist that’s updated every Friday with new releases from TuneCore Artists – stream it below!


Changing
Devan Dubois
Alternative, Pop


Older Men & Whiskey
Chyyanna Lee
Pop, Country


Monument
Lions Lions

Rock, Alternative


Goals
Nate Good

Hip Hop/Rap


Treat You Better
Throw the Fight

Rock, Alternative


In Dank We Trust

Black the Ripper
Hip Hop/Rap, New Age


Battles
Rita Springer
Christian/Gospel


86
Infected Rain

Rock


Passionfruit
Cimorelli

Pop


Addiction Kills
Jelly Roll

Hip Hop/Rap


Change: The Lost Record
Josh Thompson

Country


Black Hole Sun
Break of Reality

Rock, Instrumental

Wednesday Video Diversion: April 19, 2017

Did you know that rock and roll behemoths QUEEN were once called SMILE? Well, they were. And in on this day back in 1969 they made their debut in England as a band at the Revolution Club. Only four years before, the Beatles dropped their single “Ticket To Ride”! What do these two things have in common? Nothing. They’re just two cool British rock and roll facts from the same day in history! As always we’re here mid-week to distract you with weird trivia and an awesome line-up of TuneCore Artist music videos – so now that we’ve covered one-half of that, enjoy the other half below:

 

Rathborne, “Last Forgiven”

BLAKE, “Flexin”

CARFACE, “Playing Pretend”

VHS Collection, “Wide Awake”

Cimorelli, “Passionfruit (Drake Cover)”

Julie Hanse, “It’s Not”

Toni Romiti, “Imma Dog Too”

Black the Ripper, “Light Up Everywhere (Uber Everywhere Remix)”

Jessica Frech, “Where I Come From”


Sono Oto, “A Way to Stay Away”

New Music Friday: April 14, 2017

TuneCore Artists are releasing tons of new music every day. Each week we check out the new TuneCore releases and choose a few at random to feature on the blog.

Is your hit next?

Follow Music Made Me – a Spotify playlist that’s updated every Friday with new releases from TuneCore Artists – stream it below!


Breathe
Moosh & Twist

Hip Hop/Rap


Made 2 Love U
Johnny Balik

Pop


Freesol (feat. Skyler Stronestreet)
Seven Lions

Electronic, Dance


Bloom
RKCB

R&B/Soul, Electronic


The Outfield
The Night Game

Alternative, Rock


Hinterland
Akurei

Electronic, Alternative


Sail Away
The Dead Sailor Girls

Singer/Songwriter, Folk


Broke Royalty
Flint Eastwood

Alternative


Still Love
Ghost Against Ghost

Alternative, Electronic


I Got You
Superwalkers

Pop, Electronic


Miss Taken (Demos)
RoadTrip

Pop, Rock


The Soulvation Society
The Soulvation Society

R&B/Soul, Pop


Amame o Matame (feat. Don Omar)
Ivy Queen

Latin


Bound 2017
Baco & Termy

Electronic, Hip Hop/Rap


Ain’t Your Girl
BEATZ

Pop, R&B/Soul


So Much to Keep
AirLands

Alternative, Rock


Heart Songs: Adoration

Naomi Raine
Christian/Gospel, Singer/Songwriter


Ladies And Gentlemen: Barenaked Ladies and the Persuasions
Barenaked Ladies and the Persuasions 

Pop, Vocal


Walking In My Favor
Lucinda Moore

Christian/Gospel

Wednesday Video Diversion: April 12, 2017

Whoa…on this day 17 long, long years ago, members of the legendary heavy metal group Metallica filed a lawsuit against Napster, – who are now our friends and partners! – Yale, USC and Indiana University for copyright infringement. This was a big first step in the fight against piracy, and it was a lot to get through. Thank goodness for streaming, right?! Anyhow, with that fun fact in mind for the day, enjoy this line-up of awesome TuneCore Artist music videos which are provided to further distract you from whatever work you had hoped to accomplish:

 

High Waisted, “Party in the Back”

The Shondes, “Everything Good”

Linda May Han Oh, “Footfall”

Aaron Goodvin, “Lonely Drum”

Moosh & Twist, “All of a Sudden”

Tsyphur Zalan, “Spinal Bolt”

Lions Lions, “Between Us”

Samsara Blues Experiment, “Into the Black”

AirLands, “SpaceShips”

LA Qoolside,”Make It”

New Music Friday: April 7, 2017

TuneCore Artists are releasing tons of new music every day. Each week we check out the new TuneCore releases and choose a few at random to feature on the blog.

Is your hit next?

Follow  Music Made Me – a Spotify playlist that’s updated every Friday with new releases from TuneCore Artists – stream it below!


Life in Letters
Pierce Fulton

Electronic, Dance


Stjerneskudd
Edema, Chris Baco, Kent Ortiz, & Teigen

Pop, Dance


Can’t Go Back
Essx Station
Alternative, Pop


Call It a Night (feat. 
Guilla)
Otenki 

Pop, Rock


Can’t Stop Love
John Michael Howell

Christian/Gospel


What Goes Around
Among Savages

Alternative, Singer/Songwriter


Don’t Let Go
New Arcades

Electronic, Pop


Down
FARR

Electronic, Alternative


American 
Rebelution
The Lacs

Country


Here For a Reason
K’Valentine

Hip Hop/Rap, R&B/Soul


Beggars & Ballers (feat. Jay Nash, Tony Lucca & Matt Duke)
TFDI
Singer/Songwriter, Alternative


Them The Breaks
Rench

Country, Electronic


Message From Sylvia
Message From Sylvia

Rock, Heavy Metal


Lovely Little Lonely
The Maine

Alternative, Rock


Memory Mirror
The Octopus Project

Alternative, Electronic


It’s Still You
Hayley Solano

Singer/Songwriter, Pop


Moon & Back
Andrew James

Country


With All Due Respect
C. Goss

Hip Hop/Rap, Christian/Gospel


K Lo K
MRG

Hip Hop/Rap


Gonna Be Easy
Brian Collins

Country, Pop

An Artist’s Take on the Importance of Authenticity

[Editors Note: This is a guest blog written by Ellery Bonham, a TuneCore Artist performing as EZA. She’s acquired millions of streams across platforms, and you can check out her latest EP, Dead Reckoning, on Spotify here!]

 

When I was sixteen-years old I went on American Idol. (It was quick, seriously.) Back then in 2009, it had been a dream of mine since I was nine years old and Kelly Clarkson won the first season, closing the finale with that-song-we-say-we-hate-but-secretly-still-love, A Moment Like This. I don’t even think I auditioned hoping to win the show; what I really wanted was to see what three legitimate music professionals might think of me – a young girl from Rhode Island who grew up in a small town, a small church, and was raised by incredibly supportive, but very conservative parents. Outside of that world, I had no idea who I was, and I was finally at the age where I needed to find out if I really wanted to take music seriously.

When I arrived in California for ‘Hollywood Week’, it took about half of a second for me to realize I had nowhere near the self-awareness that the others did. After all, I was wearing clothes my mother and I deemed “nice” and “professional,” singing songs that were “sweet,” and “appropriate.” I was a singer, and just that. The other contestants were different. These people had ‘I-don’t-give-a-****’ hair and assertive style. They were the epitome of effervescence; their spirits bled with fearlessness and individuality.

I remember feeling so envious of the freedom that they allowed themselves. I wanted to know what it was like to wear clothes solely based on how confident they made me feel. I wanted to be on stage not to entertain, but to share a moment with the audience that could make a stranger feel known. I wanted to perform songs that expressed my soul rather than stroked my ego.

I never knew the difference between an ‘artist’ and a ‘singer’ until I met some of these people. Understanding the distinction was just the beginning of the agonizing journey of authenticity that lay ahead. When I finally returned home, I brought with me an understanding that branding and vulnerability were just as important as one’s talent in order to achieve success in this field. So a few years later, I moved to Nashville to study the entertainment industry and learn how to pursue a career as an artist.

I’m now about to be 24-years old, and EZA has been my artist project for three years. I’ve been doing it full-time for the past year-and-a-half, and have learned more about music business and authenticity than I ever thought I could handle. I can’t even count the number of times I have gotten my ass handed to me because I didn’t do my research, I jumped the gun, or tried to operate with my walls up. Talent aside, you cannot do this job if you’re uneducated about the field and you cannot do it as a fraud.

That is the kicker in this industry – why being an artist is the ultimate paradox: Creating music requires your heart, sustaining your career requires your mind, and each are constantly threatened by the the other. I think if anyone followed an indie artist around for a year, they wouldn’t believe how or why we still wake up every day and keep trying to find the balance.

Over the years, I’ve come to a really difficult conclusion that might slap you across the face just as hard as it’ll kiss you with encouragement: Those of us who master the heart and mind paradox will be successful. I truly believe if we are good enough at what we do (music and vulnerability) and want it bad enough (work ethic and business) we will find the success we are so desperately chasing.

I know that sounds too simple to be true, perhaps even too cold to be true. But it is. Many of us have been told that luck is half of what makes a person in the music industry successful. (It’s true that for some, luck helps speed the process along.) However, I don’t believe that we find luck so much as we make our own.

We cannot give up the wheel and stop taking responsibility for our own careers. Relying on anyone else to make you successful, or blaming something/someone for never becoming successful is simply a defense mechanism; it is a deflection to avoid taking matters into our own hands.The truth is, when you’re doing something right for long enough, it is impossible to go unnoticed. As Steve Martin says, “Be so good, they can’t ignore you.”

If you’ve never read The War of Art by Steven Pressfield, stop what you’re doing, open Amazon right now, order a copy- and then continue reading. More than anyone I’ve ever read, Pressfield puts words to every internal-struggle a creative individual has ever faced. He teaches the deception of “Resistance” and the different ways our mind tries to distract us from doing the very work we feel called to create. The entire book is a collection of small chapters that speak truth after truth about why we aren’t where we think we should be. Accepting that we are the only one in our way is a jagged pill to swallow, but there is also unimaginable freedom when we embrace it. In the end, those of us who strip away the B.S. and really figure out who we are and how to do it well are going to end up where we want to be.

If you’re still unsure about hopping on board, I’ll close with some send-off questions:

  1. What am I really trying to say in my songs? (What am I not saying and need to?)
  2. Who am I afraid to let down if I reveal my true self?
  3. Am I vulnerable enough to confront what “my best” looks like right now? Do I hold back from giving 100% of myself to my work because I am afraid to see that “my best” is in fact, disappointing?
  4. What would it sound like if I only released songs that brought me to tears of joy, sadness, or anger, when I wrote them?
  5. What would my band/project look like if I started over right now and only committed to ideas that I would bet my career on?

I’m curious to hear how this sits with you. Feel free to reach out at contact@ezamusic.com or hit up the comment section if you’d like to keep the discussion going.