5 Things Artists Can Do to Build Their Network

[Editors Note: This blog was written by Rich Nardo. Rich is a freelance writer and editor, and is the co-founder of 24West a full-service creative agency focusing on music and tech.]

 

It doesn’t matter what industry you’re in or what aspirations you have for yourself professionally, at the end of the day you’re only as strong as your network. In the past, there was a bit of a stigma about artists being active in terms of connecting with music business professionals beyond playing shows and hoping their manager can get a label rep or two out to see them play. For a musician or band to be viewed as an “artist”, it had to appear they didn’t care how successful they were. The rule of thumb for creating a successful music career was to “get in the system without personally engaging in it”. As a result, a lot of artists ended up getting completely ripped off by said system or never truly reached their potential as a career musician because they felt it was ‘uncool’ to take matters into their own hands. Thankfully, those times are done.

In the 90s, we saw punk and hip hop bust open the door and show that you could be a ‘cred’ artist and still handle your business as a professional. One look at what Jay Z did with Rockafella or Brett Gurewitz (of Bad Religion) did with Epitaph (and all its subsidiaries) will put to bed the idea that real artists don’t involve themselves in the business of the business. In the subsequent years, this has trickled down to each level of artist; from Metallica finally gaining the rights to all their masters a few years ago to the bedroom producer running their own press and Spotify campaigns around their singles.

Here are five ways that independent artists can be more aggressive in taking their fate into their own hands:

1. Facebook and Linkedin Groups

Okay, so maybe involving yourself in Linkedin Groups is a little ambitious for most artists, but there are plenty of Music Business Networking groups on Facebook. I pull new contacts and valuable strategic information from these sorts of groups literally every day. While a lot of my personal favorite groups are invite only, there are plenty that are open for anyone to join. Start joining these groups first and gradually as your network grows you’ll gain access to some of the more exclusive ones. Same principle applies to Linkedin groups if you’re willing to delve into those waters as well.

2. Don’t Be Afraid to Cold Email

A lot of people are under the impression that it’ll be a waste of time to email the people they look up to, but doing so can lead to the biggest breaks you’re going to find. What’s important is to just do so with tact. Don’t email an A&R from your favorite label or the guitarist in that band you’ve been obsessed with lately to speak about yourself or ask a favor. Hit them up with specific questions and ask for advice that doesn’t require them to commit to anything. For example…do you really love a particular manager’s roster? Do they always seem to release music in the way you wish you did? Find a contact there and reach out.

Here’s a basic example of a way to reach out that may be fruitful for you:

Hey <artist manager>, my name is Rich and I am a songwriter. I currently play in a band called <band name>. We’re about to release our first record and I am really big fan of the way you roll out new singles with your roster. I was wondering if I could buy you a cup of coffee or shoot over a couple of questions via email to pick your brain a little bit if that’s okay? Thanks so much for your time and I look forward to hearing back from you!”.

3. Go To Networking Events

Same principle as the Facebook Networking Groups but in real life. If you live in a major city like Chicago, Austin, New York or Los Angeles there are ample such events you can find and attend. If you don’t, start your own group. It may be sparsely populated at first but it’ll grow over time. Also, keep in mind that when you’re first getting started these events are about quantity. When you’re starting out you should try to meet anybody and everybody in your city that is involved in the music industry. As you progress, you can hone in on those with events specifically for the bigger players.<

4. Embrace the Hashtag

There are certain hashtags that you should monitor and look to throw yourself into the resulting conversation on Twitter, for instance #MusicBiz. This is a great way to figure out what is currently trending in your professional world, engage others with the same goal and start establishing yourself as someone that people should take seriously. The same sort of success can be achieved by following music business professionals and engaging them in conversation around industry-related articles or thoughts that they post.

5. Collaborate!

A beautiful thing about a music ‘scene’, whether in real life or digitally, that often gets overlooked is the exposure to each others network. Whether you’re collaborating with another artist on a local show or tour, creating a networking group or writing/recording a song together, if you work together both of your networks will automatically double for the endeavor.

If you take a little time each day to dedicate to these suggestions, you will see incredible gains in terms of your understanding of the music business, as well as, the number of opportunities that are presented to you. Also, it puts you in a position where you have a lot more of the chips on your side of the table when the time is right to start talking to labels and managers about your project.

The Sneaky Way to Promote Your Music Without Actually Talking About Your Music

[Editors Note: This blog was written by Dave Kusek and originally appeared on the Sonicbids Blog.]

I know it sounds completely counterintuitive to promote your music and raise awareness for yourself as an artist without actually talking about your music – or your music career, for that matter. But it’s being done more and more and has become a really powerful way to make a name for yourself by bypassing the crowded indie-musician market.

Let me explain. The key is to establish yourself as an expert in some related topic like gear, self-releasing music, or songwriting. It’s about sharing valuable information on a topic you have a lot of experience in to draw potential fans. They find you by searching for “how to write a song,” or “how to book your own gigs,” or “guitar pedal review,” and discover your music through that connection.

Push vs. pull marketing

Traditionally, there are two ways to go about promoting your music. You can either push your message out to fans and potential fans (push marketing), or you can pull them in and get them to come to you (pull marketing).

Push marketing is those typical advertisements you see on TV and hear on the radio. They’re just pushing information out about their product to a large audience hoping to reach someone who may be interested.

Pull marketing is about giving out valuable information that you know your target audience is searching for. This valuable information could be exclusive or behind-the-scenes access to you as an artist. This kind of content will pull in current fans and deepen your relationship.

But you could also share advice on something you have a lot of experience with. This will help you reach a new audience who may not even be familiar with your music.

So let’s go through the strategy step-by-step.

1. Find your expertise

The first step is finding something you have a lot of experience and knowledge in. As a musician, you have a few really obvious routes – music, songwriting, mixing, mastering, music theory, gear, instruments, etc. These are the skills that form the very foundation of your career, so you definitely have a lot of valuable information to bring to the table here.

Many musicians, including Scale the Summit’s bassist Mark Michell, have set up online schools to share their musical knowledge and techniques. The key here is to bring this training online instead of doing local lessons. Not only will you be able to reach a much larger audience, you’ll also start showing up in Google searches for things like “online bass lessons.”

Other musicians pull on other skill sets like music business knowledge, booking gigs, or creating YouTube videos. DIY musician Ari Herstand, for example, runs the blog Ari’s Take, where he shares his experiences and the skills he’s learned from booking his own shows and generally running his own career. Other musicians like Alex Cowles share their knowledge on self-releasing music.

2. Find the right platform

If you want people to organically find you, the best option is to go online. Depending on the kind of information you share, your platform may be a little different. So, if you’re creating music lessons, videos may be your best bet. Try making YouTube tutorials, playthroughs, and lessons, and release them regularly to build an audience.

On the other hand, if you’re sharing the things you’ve learned on getting your songs licensed or booking college gigs, a blog may suit your information better. Gear and guitar pedal reviews and demonstrations might use a combination of blog posts and videos.

You could also aim to partner with other media outlets to share out your information. This will help you get your name out to a larger audience. In addition to his own blog, Ari Herstand also writes for Digital Music News. Maybe you could get a regular column in a small online music magazine or music industry blog – start small and grow from there.

3. Show up in search

Now that you have your content up, you need to make sure people can actually find it. There are plenty of SEO guides out there, but basically, you just want to think about what people are actually typing into search. There are also a lot of cool tools like Google’s Keyword Planner that can give you some ideas.

You want the keywords and article titles you choose to be relevant and specific to what you’re posting. So if you’re posting a review of a certain guitar pedal, a title like “Boss Waza Craft VB-2W Vibrato Review” will perform better than “Guitar Pedal Review.” Likewise, if you’re sharing your tips on how to set up good lighting for a music video, something like “Setting Up Good Lighting for a Music Video” will probably do the trick.

Of course, good SEO won’t instantly drive thousands of people to your articles and videos. It’s going to take a lot of work and consistent posting to build up an audience.

4. Create the connection

Here’s the most important part of this strategy: you need to make the connection to your music and drive your viewers or readers to check it out. After all, music is your main gig.

There are a few options here. You could obviously host your blog on your band’s site, or share your tutorials or gear reviews on your band’s YouTube channel. That way, your music is just a click away. This works, but it will make it more difficult to get the SEO working like you want.

If you host your content off your music website, you need to make the connection obvious. Include an “About” page that shares your story. Highlight your musical journey and your creative career as an indicator of your expertise on the subject.

You should also mention your career and bring out stories in your articles and videos.Preface an amp review by saying you brought it on tour and recorded some awesome sounding live videos with it. Include the live video to prove your point (and introduce your readers to your music).

If you’re teaching people on YouTube about modes, you could mention that you used a certain mode when writing a new song you have out. Play a short section of that song to show your point and include a card in the top right corner to link to your music video.

TuneCore’s New Refer a Friend Program Helps Artists Earn and Save

Anyone creating music in 2017 knows that collaboration is a beautiful thing. Whether it’s a featured hip hop verse, a bluegrass rhythm section, or two songwriters coming together in the studio, musicians working toward a common artistic goal can have incredible results. Heck, we’ve even talked about apps that allow artists to collaborate with greater ease than ever.

In the spirit of indie artists doing right by their fellow indie artists, TuneCore is proud to roll out an all new “Refer A Friend” program! This opportunity gives you a chance to hook up some of your fellow artists who – unlike you – don’t know how to get their music sold online yet.

As long as you are a TuneCore Artist with an active distribution, each friend who you refer gets 20% off of their first release, and you get to release your next single on us!

All you need to do to get started is head over to our Refer A Friend page and choose how you want to invite friends to take advantage of this opportunity. You can email them directly using our portal, or open it up to your friends and family on social media by choosing to post right to Facebook or Twitter.

However you choose to share, you’ll be given a unique URL for your friends to click. It’ll take them to TuneCore to learn more, and if they choose to sign up and distribute, an automatic 20% off will be added to their release. Once they release their music using your link, you’ll receive an email with a free Single Distribution code! Simple as that.

tunecore-refer-a-friend

TuneCore is already proud to benefit from a solid reputation in the independent music community, and we owe a continuous ‘thanks’ to the artists who have helped us grow via word-of-mouth. Now moving forward, we’re happy to be able to give back to you

Start referring your indie artist friends today.

Are You Guilty? 4 Ways Indie Artists Are Killing Social Media

[Editors Note: This post was written by Joshua Smotherman, co-founder of Middle Tennessee Music, and it originally appeared on the Cyber PR blog.]

 

In an ideal world I would wake up in the morning to a fresh cup of hot coffee. I would enjoy it as I check my e-mail and skim social networks to check up on friends and my favorite bands.

I would immerse myself in an online community of music lovers, songwriters, and musicians sharing, caring, and building with each other… NOT blasting commands to “check out my new hottest thing”.

I see enough billboards on the interstate.

In this world:

  • Bands would stop acting like rock stars and start acting like leaders
  • They would build self-sustaining tribes
  • They would listen to their fans
  • They would understand that growing organically will always win over view counts

As a music blogger, my inbox would NOT be full of one-liners and YouTube links I only see as distractions. Whatever happened to “connecting” with someone?

Unfortunately, this world does not exist. From where I’m sitting, the average indie band sucks at using social media and its ruining it for everyone else. Most importantly, your potential fans.

What are we doing wrong, you say?

Oh boy…where do I begin?

Me, Me, Me Marketing

You might have been raised in a world of billboards and commercials, but using social media as a one way street is killing your promo game.

It seems too many people are missing the social half of the phrase, social media.

You need to engage with fans and listeners instead of blasting them with links, videos, and nonsense about buying your album.

Sadly, most bands qualify [as what the marketing world refers to] as spammers.

Engaging is easier than you think and should come naturally (assuming you are not a recluse).

  • Share albums, videos, and news about other music you enjoy or local bands you play with. Ask others what they think.
  • Share news related to the music industry or issues that reflect the personality of your band and use them to engage in conversation.
  • Instead of posting links to the same videos and songs repeatedly, post clips of the band working in the studio or upload a demo mix and allow fans to share their opinions so you can take the art to another level. Involve fans in your process(es).
  • Network with bands in other areas to create an atmosphere for gig swapping and collaboration as well as cross promotion of content.

This list goes on but the takeaway here is engage in a way that results in feedback and interaction.

Build a community.

Focusing on the wrong metrics

Your follower count means nothing unless you see conversions.

Huh?!

More important than a follower, view, or like:

  • How many fans have signed up for your mailing list?
  • Do you pass around a mailing list signup sheet at your show?
  • How many people have you met at shows? (You do hang out with the audience after the show…right?)
  • How many people have bought a CD or t-shirt?

Stop putting all your energy into increasing numbers on social sites and focus on converting the followers you have into loyal fans.

Use social media to funnel music listeners to your website where you attempt to convert them into a mailing list signup, song download, or merchandise sale.

Would you rather have 1,000 likes or 100 fans spending $1,000 on music, merch, show tickets and crowd funding campaigns?

Show me the money!

Repeating yourself on every social network

Sending your Twitter feed to Facebook then copying and pasting it to Google+ so the same message appears on every site is a horrible idea.

So is auto play on audio embeds but that’s for a different time.

You are not expected to know marketing, you make music! Allow me to guide you on this train of thinking…

People who use Twitter are different than people who use Facebook and the people who use Google+ are not like the others.

It is imperative you consider these facts when developing a social media strategy and act accordingly.

Make sure you actually use social media as a music fan before deciding how to market your music using these tools. Follow bands who are in a position you would like to be in and see how they use each network. Notice what works, what doesn’t work, and then perfect your plan of action.

Posting several updates to Twitter every hour (depending on the nature of the updates) is more acceptable than posting to Facebook every 15 minutes.

When you over saturate a person’s FB News Feed, they hide you from their feed. Or worse…unlike your page or mark your posts as spam.

A general guideline is try to retweet, reply, comment, and share relevant content from others more than you broadcast and peddle your own wares.

Sell Without Selling

If you focus on building a community around your band instead of acting as a bulletin board, you will start noticing the true power of social media.

You will not see overnight results.

The key is to stay consistent, focus on creating great music, and communicate directly with your audience.

If you create a community of loyal fans, they will want to support you.

Your community will become your sales force and all you need to do is be yourself and continue giving fans a band worth loving.

Consistency allows you to reach a tipping point where fans begin promoting your music for you by wearing t-shirts, playing CDs at parties, and recommending you to their friends.

It is hard to conceive this when you are starting at zero, but 6 to 12 months down the road you will notice things happening simply because you remained persistent.

While fans are busy promoting your music, you need to seek out gig opportunities, blog reviews or interviews, and other chances to put yourself in the presence of tastemakers who can expose you to their audience.

Bloggers, journalists, booking agents, and other industry personnel will not give you their attention unless you have proof of a loyal, engaged following.

Buying followers or views might help you manipulate chart rankings and other metrics, but they will never replace the power of community. If you have 5,000 page likes but no one is liking, sharing, or commenting on your updates; we all see right through you.

So can the people who can expose you to bigger audiences of music fans.

In closing:

  • Build your tribe
  • Nurture your community
  • Stop acting like a corporate sales machine

You might also be interested in this panel discussion concerning Marketing, PR, and Promotion on a Budget hosted by Indie Connect NYC which discusses mores things indie musicians are doing wrong online.

How Have You Avoided Killing Social Media?

Let us know below what you have done to overcome these four social media killers above (or any others that you’ve experienced) in the form of a comment below!

The Upsides to Releasing Music Often or Rarely

[Editors Note: This week, columnist Hugh McIntyre explores what many independent artists often question: How often should I release music? In this installment, Hugh touts the benefits of releasing often as well as rarely. And just so we’re being fair, stay tuned for the second installment, which will cover the downsides of each strategy to consider!]

 

​When you become a full-time musician, there is a lot to consider. What kind of artist do you want to be? Are you going to be elusive and never publish a true photo of yourself? Are you going to be the kind that inundates your fans on social media every day? Will you constantly surprise fans with music they weren’t expecting? Are you going to lead with streaming, or attempt to sell music in a time when that’s becoming less and less likely?

One of the most important decisions you need to make is how often you’ll release new music. Some artists seem to always have something you haven’t heard before, while others space out their collections, with years passing before any new material emerges. This isn’t always a decision you can make, and at times, fate and circumstances decide. Other times, you’re in power, and it’s up to you. So, what’s a working musician to do?

There are upsides to both options, and you should carefully weigh the two before choosing one to stick with for a while.

Often

Releasing music nonstop can be tiring, but there are plenty of benefits that you’ll want to consider if you’re going to attempt to go this route, if even for a period of time.

If you continuously release new music, with only very short breaks in between new singles and albums, you’re likely going to earn more money. Simply put, if you have more products, your fans will buy more. Once somebody has ordered a song or album, they are essentially out until the next album cycle, at least in terms of purchasing music. They won’t hand over more cash for downloads or physical copies of your tunes until there is something new out there.

Constantly delivering new work also gives you an excellent opportunity to tour over and over again. If you haven’t released anything for a long time, some of your fans will still buy a ticket when you come to town, but if your show is simply you playing the same songs over and over, it won’t take long for people to decide they can wait until the next batch of tracks is shared…if they’re still interested at that point.

New music is also always a wonderful way to drum up excitement when it comes to the media. Similar to how your fans purchase music, once a blog has written about your new song, getting them to cover the same piece of music in a slightly different way is almost impossible. Blogs and magazines need new material almost as badly as your fans do. If you can continuously send the outlets that have supported you in the past solid, just-released art, there is a pretty good chance they will cover you in many different ways, and that will help your name get out there. The more often music lovers (and industry insiders, including other writers) are seeing your moniker pop up, the more likely they are to become interested and give you a listen as well. It’s a cycle that repeats and grows larger every time it comes around.

Rarely

On the flip side of that argument, some acts only share new music every so often, and in some ways, that’s benefited their careers immensely.

If you’re the type of artist that spaces out album campaigns by a few years, you are less likely to experience burnout, which is a serious issue with musicians. Instead of touring all the time and constantly having to come up with new, catchy tunes, you as an artist can take your time and truly create the best work possible. That might not necessarily sound appealing in the beginning, but many artists slow down as their career progresses, simply out of necessity. If you start down that road in the beginning, your fans will know what to expect, and they won’t notice (or be disappointed) if you spend a little extra time on that next album.

There is also a perception (that is typically incorrect, but that’s not what’s being debated here) that if an artist releases new singles and albums all the time, they are somewhat less-than. While one artist may spend as many hours on a song as the next, if the first releases a track every week, the work can appear to be…cheapened in a way. It’s not necessarily fair, but that’s the perception. Consumers are more likely to spend money on things they consider to be valuable and worth their investment, and if your excelent work is something they have to wait patiently for and they are excited for it, there is probably a subset of them that group that won’t bat an eye at opening their wallet for something that seems to happen rarely, if it’s for a good reason.

Giving your music time to breathe and really get out to the world properly highlights the fact that while you’re selling music as a product, it is also ART, and it should be treated and valued as such.

In The Middle

Of course, there is always a middle ground, which is where most artists reside. Many working artists drop new collections every two years or so (or slightly more often) and tour and promote those for a long time, taking only a short break in between one cycle and the next. That is typically how the music industry has conducted business for the past few decades, and it has worked fine for a long time. Sure, things are changing, but most working acts are still able to pay the bills with that type of plan, though it’s not for everybody.

10 Things You Should Legally Do As An Entertainer

[Editors Note: This is a guest blog written by Justin M. Jacobson, Esq. Justin is an entertainment and media attorney for The Jacobson Firm, P.C. in New York City. He also runs Label 55 and teaches music business at the Institute of Audio Research.]

 

While there are no real bright line rules that an entertainer must follow, there are some essential strategies that a musician should take into account when conducting their music business in the new year. As we have already explored, a musician should approach their career as a business, which includes following the applicable state and federal laws, to ensure they adequately and properly exploit their works and receive the full intended benefit from them.

With that said, we have compiled a few guiding resolutions that an entertainer should take to heart and implement this new year.

1. Always consult an entertainment attorney prior to signing anything. When you sign something, it will generally bind you to the terms of the contract, whether you understand them or not.

While this might seem obvious and straight forward, many individuals simply sign what they are presented without fully understanding the nature of the document and what the terms actually mean in a practical sense. A musician also may fail to realize that most agreements are negotiable; so, a first offer isn’t usually a “take it or leave it” arrangement, as most situations should permit the discussion and negotiation of some important points prior to the signing. If it is presented as a “take it or leave it” proposition, that is an indication that an artist might want to avoid the deal. Hard sell salesmen usually indicate that an artist should run. An artist should always have time to consider the deal after “the heat” of the moment has passed.

This is also an important resolution as sometimes an entertainer may just search the Internet to obtain some standard template or form in an attempt to feel that they are properly secure. In theory, this might be good and might work fine; but, an attorney specializing in the field will bring an expertise and understanding that ensures you have the proper terms and the agreement you sign actually operates as you intended it to. An artist’s worst nightmare is signing something that doesn’t provide the artist with the rights they thought they had. This mistake prevents them from fully realizing their work’s worth. If the cost of obtaining an attorney is too high, there are many volunteer organizations, such Volunteer Lawyers For The Arts, that provide cost-free or reduced fee legal guidance to creators.

2. Always obtain a license to use a “sample,” i.e., anything used in a recording that isn’t yours and is somebody else’s. Failure to clear a “sample” can cause more liability on a potential hit to the sample’s owners than the hit makes.

This is a fairly straight-forward resolution as utilizing something that doesn’t belong to an artist can subject them to liability. It is essential to ensure that an artist has rights to whatever they use. A simple motto is that, if this isn’t the artist’s, then the artist should not use it without first obtaining rights. This will save an artist many headaches and potentially thousands of dollars. An artist who creates their own beats and samples can also reduce the issues. We explored “sampling” basics in more detail in a prior installment.

3. If you’re a songwriter, make sure to sign up as a writer with a performing right society and index your songs. In America, they are: A.S.C.A.P., B.M.I., and S.E.S.A.C.

If an individual is a songwriter, they are entitled to various streams of income when their works are publicly performed. In order to obtain some of this income, the songwriter must “sign-up” with a performing rights society. These societies collect public performance royalties on behalf of their songwriters. In order to be properly paid by these organizations, the songwriter’s works must be completely indexed. This means that the songwriter’s compositions are properly listed in the performance rights society’s databases with all the appropriate ownership information. To sign-up and index a songwriter’s music, visit ASCAP, BMI or SESAC. My further discussion on “Publishing” monies is available on Hypebot.

4. Always file your federal and state income taxes, and consult with a tax professional to ensure you are in compliance with all state, city and federal tax laws.

This resolution is one that an artist should already be complying with in their personal life. In addition, if an individual started their own corporate entity to create their music empire, they must ensure that their yearly corporate taxes are also filed. An accountant should be consulted to make sure that all appropriate state, federal and/or city corporate taxes are properly filed. We explored corporate and tax matters as they related to the music business in prior articles.

5. Always register your copyright in a work with the U.S. Copyright Office because failure to register a copyright will prevent the recovery of certain damages for infringement, including attorneys’ fees.

While a creator can simply mail themselves a created work without opening it as a way to prove copyright, this procedure does not afford the creator with all the rights a registered copyright confers. Although the Berne Convention provides for a “copyright” in a work upon the creation and fixing of it in a tangible medium of expression, the lack of federal registration limits an owner’s available recourse if their work is infringed. My further discussion on why an artist should register their “copyrighted” work is available on Hypebot.

6. Always do a trademark search prior to selecting a company or entertainment name, and have a qualified attorney do so.

Before embarking on this wonderful voyage called “music,” an artist should ensure that the name and corresponding social media and website domains are available prior to creating and marketing works under a particular name. The worst situation is building a following with a certain name to only receive a “cease and desist” letter from another similarly named artist demanding that an artist stop utilizing this name. Ensuring that a name is clear prior to using it will save the artist from a significant amount of headaches and potential costly legal bills.

7. If you’re in a band or a group, make sure to have a signed band agreement that details the members’ rights and responsibilities.

Band members should resolve to ensure that all applicable band members’ matters and procedures are discussed and agreed to in a writing signed by all the members. This is necessary to avoid any misunderstandings. This document should list the proper mechanisms to ensure the continued profitability of a band, especially if certain internal situations or relationships begin to deteriorate. My further discussion on what should be included in a band member agreement is available on Hypebot.

8. If you have a manager, make sure you have a signed agreement with them.

In most situations, an artist’s first manager, or sometimes only manager, is their friend, family member or significant other. While, familiarity and trust may exist in these relationships; when money and in particular, substantial sums are involved, it is prudent to have a signed agreement. That document would outline who is entitled to what and under what circumstances. Since this is business, it is vital that all the parties understand the nature of the relationship and that all parties are adequately protected. Having an executed agreement listing all of the agreed upon matters ensures that a neutral arbitrator (the document) exists to hopefully resolve any differences that may arise.

9. If you are a performer or producer of a recording, always make sure you register with SoundExchange and the Alliance of Artists and Recording Companies to ensure you receive all the royalties you are entitled to.

All artists should resolve to ensure that they receive all the funds they are entitled to, including certain royalties they may not be aware of. Two of these royalty streams that many artist’s neglect to properly manage are SoundExchange and D.A.R.T. royalties from the Alliance Of Artists and Recording Companies (A.A.R.C.). These entities exist to obtain royalties on behalf of an artist that signs up with them. An artist signs up with these entities enabling these companies to collect royalties on the artist’s behalf. My further discussion on why you should sign-up for SoundExchange is available on Hypebot and for additional information on A.A.R.C., visit my prior article available  and their official website.

10. If you are working on a recording with a producer or a performer that isn’t you, then you need an agreement with that person to clarify ownership of the recording.

An artist should always remember that if a contribution isn’t theirs, then the artist cannot use it unless they have rights from the creator to utilize it. This applies to any beat, vocals or other material that the artist didn’t personally perform and is included in a final sound recording. An artist should make a resolution to obtain an agreement with every individual they work with to ensure they have all the rights to utilize the finished material. We explored the need for an agreement with a producer of a “beat” and for any co-creator or co-writer.

As 2017 begins, an artist should remember that following these simple resolutions will be a great start to getting their music business house in order and running properly.

This article is not intended as legal advice, as an attorney specializing in the field should be consulted.