Studio Spotlight: The Record Co. Focuses on Access Over Profit in Boston

Boston, Massachusetts is home to over 250,000 college students. With institutions like Harvard, M.I.T., Berklee College of Music, Emerson, Boston College and a slew of others, it’s a given that you’d see plenty of artists and bands finding their legs in a major U.S. city – whether they’re undergrads meeting at a local party or show, or a grad student furthering their music career by way of education. Growing up in the area, I recall being obsessed with bands in the ‘local scene’ – catching the T to see bands play in places from Elks Lodges to 18+ venues that I had to ‘borrow’ an ID to get into. But even then I noticed a turnover, as bands would migrate to other parts like New York and L.A., or venues with all-ages access would close unexpectedly.

While this isn’t uncommon, there’s still a lot to love about Boston’s music scene, but it can be a difficult place to live and survive as a musician or engineer. And what about the potential fans who don’t know what’s in their backyard?

Enter The Record Co. – a Boston-based non-profit facility that provides access to an affordable space to record quality projects and opportunities to freelance engineers and producers. The result is a much-praised collaborative atmosphere that is helping to change the landscape of Boston’s independent music scene. Not to mention, The Record Co. does a wonderful job of showing off all Boston has to offer with their Boston Sessions collaborative mixtape series, with Vol. 2 coming out soon!

In this month’s Studio Spotlight, I spoke to Jesse Vengrove, Program Director (and engineer/musician) at The Record Co. to discuss how the non-profit’s approach to offering this kind of access and how it’s been paying off:

First and foremost, what inspired you to start The Record Co. and do so as a non-profit?

Go up to any studio owner and ask them the following two questions and you’ll probably get similar responses:

1) “Are you making a large profit?” – “No”

2) “Why are you doing this then?” – “I love the work and I think it’s important/has cultural and/or artistic value.”

And there you have the most informal definition of a non-profit organization.

The Record Co. was founded in 2009 and, after a failed startup (first location flooded), we moved to our current facility in 2010.  The non-profit angle came out of a realization that that no one really needs to own a studio, people just need access to one.

We wanted to create a space that was accessible to everyone, regardless of socioeconomic status, race, gender, and we wanted to create a space that was a part of the community and give back to the city.  We charge our clients to use the facility like any other studio but the rates are subsidized by foundations/grants and individual donors who believe it’s important to cultivate a vibrant and creative scene in Boston.

We’ve found a way to allow artists to come in and use the facility at a price point that works for small/non-existent budgets while relying on other sources of funding to keep daily operations running. In 2017 we’re on track to host 1,100 sessions between the two rooms, so needless to say there’s a demand that we’re filling (while still seeing new studios pop up and legacy studios stay in business).

Give our readers a little bit of a breakdown of the facility overall. What sets your studios apart from others in the area?

We currently have about 5,000 sq/ft split up over 2 floors which gives us a fair amount of space. We have two studios, Studio A and Studio B (yeah, super creative!).  Studio A is 2,500 sq/ft and includes a full kitchen and a lounge (with an ever-growing homage to the amazing art collection at Goodwill). We wanted it to feel like you’re walking into your friend’s living room, warm and homey.  We kept a lot of the windows up there so there’s a lot of natural light, which really makes the room comfortable.  There are two iso booths in there and a large live room.  You can get giant drum sounds up there (and we once squeezed a 45-person orchestra in there) or you can control/segment the room with gobos.  It’s a large space but we did our best to keep sightlines open so no one feels disconnected.

Studio B is our smaller vocal/overdub room.  This room is a little more chic than Studio A; no windows to the outside, color-changing LED lights, leather couch.  It’s a small but spacious enough so it doesn’t ever feel crowded, and everyone always loves the homemade absorption panels covering the wall.  Studio B definitely has a more traditional feel to it compared to A but it’s by no means sterile; it’s still a comfortable room to work in.  There’s a lounge outside the studio so there’s lots of space to spread out.  Studio B has it’s own private bathroom which sounds most excellent for re-amping.

Obviously you provide a space for the many artists of Boston to record, but tell us a little more about how your setup has benefited freelance engineers over your seven-year history.

TRC is a 100% freelance studio, which means that we don’t have any staff engineers.  We think it’s really important for artists to work with technical professionals that they get along with (both personally and musically) and so we enforce that every client brings in their own engineer.  At this point we have 1,100 gigs for freelancers every year happening in our facility, and we’ve priced our studios in a way that leaves room for engineers to charge a reasonable rate for their services.

When clients need referrals we refer to our staff, who are all great engineers as well (but they still negotiate their own rates and get paid directly by the client as a freelancer).  We also see a lot of engineers coming in from other studios around town (Q Division, Mad Oak, Zippah, Futura…) which we love.

Has the way you operate fostered its own community within the greater music scene? Do you feel you’re providing a space for collaboration and networking?

We see thousands of musicians/artists/engineers through our doors every year so I’m happy to say that it feels like we have a large community surrounding the work that that we do.  We really value the face-to-face interaction that takes place in recording studio and are happy to see so many people coming out of their basements or bedrooms and collaborating.  The best music doesn’t get made in a vacuum, it usually takes a team.

How do you feel that The Record Co. has contributed to the ever-changing landscape of the arts in Boston?

We’ve contributed in two ways: through direct support to artists/musicians and through an effort to raise general awareness about the great music that is being made in our city.  There is an obvious need for the programming we do as there are thousands of people that have taken advantage of our studios.  We have had bands and engineers tell us that we are the reason they stayed in Boston instead of moving to NYC or LA which is extremely meaningful to us and shows that there is a need for the work that we are doing.

We have also made an effort to engage music fans in Boston and let them know that you don’t need to look to NYC/LA or Pitchfork/Rolling Stone to find good new music, there’s actually tons of being made all around you.  Raising the reputation and awareness of what’s happening here in Boston is a long process but it only serves to make the city feel more like home for all of the musicians/artists that struggle to live and work here in Boston.

For a city home to a quarter of a million college students and a mayoral administration hoping to retain this population after graduation, what else does Boston need to be a happier home to working musicians and engineers?

That’s a tough one and is something we talk about regularly.  All-ages music venues, more (well maintained) rehearsal spaces, better public transportation, affordable housing inside city-limits…. None of these things are easy problems to solve but all would go a long way towards making the city a more hospitable place for artist and engineers.

Speaking of those college students, how does the Recor Co. interact with student artists and engineers-in-training from local colleges and universities? 

We wanted to price our studio rates in such a way that artists could afford to rent an appropriate amount of time to actually accomplish what they set out to.  These days the only way for artists to develop themselves is to act as their own A&R and just keep recording and tweaking until they finally land on something good.

Because we also cater to a lot of engineers who are just getting their start or haven’t worked in a studio outside of a college setting we host orientations every other week which consists of a conversation about expectations and best practices while working in a professional setting, how to avoid pit-falls that have the potential to kill the vibe for the players, and then a full technical walkthrough of the facility.  We always have staff around to assist with any technical questions/issues and we do have a great crew of part-time assistants that are able to help out as well.

After six years in business you dropped Boston Sessions, Volume 1 – which resulted in a very cool development in the Rock Band video game franchise! – what led you to releasing this? What was the reaction from artists and labels involved?

We really wanted to tackle both raising the reputation of what’s happening in our music scene and also provide an economic opportunity for the artists involved.  ‘Vol.1 – Beast’ featured 13 brand new tracks by 13 Boston-based artists.  In total we paid 63 artists/engineers/producers to make the record, which we’re really proud of.

Artist and sponsors alike both loved the project.  It was unique as it was all brand new material (not pre-recorded content) and really provided a cool cross-section of the diverse scene in Boston.  We were really happy to work with Harmonix to get the album featured in Rock Band, which is by far one of the craziest things to come from the project.  We also just finished up a large donated outdoor ad campaign around the city and on the trains called “Boston Music Is” which features pictures of artists from the comp.  It’s great to see the city showing some love for the artists that make it a cool place to be.

The album is available for streaming on Bandcamp and Spotify and vinyl is in our web store.

What can we expect on the upcoming volume of Boston Sessions? Beyond promoting the Record Co. and the artists featured, what hopes do you have for the release?

Vol. 2 is going to be an awesome collection of new music from some great artists around the city.  We really hope this go around that we not only turn heads in Boston but in other cities as well.  Ultimately we want Boston to be seen as a music destination and the Boston Sessions program is just one step along that path to get there.

 

Studio Spotlight: Lakehouse Recording Studios Contribute to the Lasting Legacy of Asbury Park’s Music Scene

Continuing our monthly look at awesome recording studios – from the scenes they serve and the atmosphere they cultivate for independent artists – we find ourselves in the seaside town of Asbury Park, New Jersey. Known for legends like the bandleader/trombonist Arthur Pryor and rock idol Bruce Springsteen, on top of some notable music venues, the Jersey Shore city has a proud history of celebrating its musical roots.

A few years back, musician and career engineer Jon Leidersdorff opened Lakehouse Recording Studios. Feeling the need to expand his offerings, Lakehouse was designed and built in a building that also features the reputable Russo Music store, as well as Lakehouse Music Academy, a music school for students of all ages and levels. It only makes sense that this complex features a state of the art, two-studio recording facility, right?

We talked to Jon about getting the studio up and running, what sets it apart from the rest, and what it means to be providing recording solutions to the musicians of his hometown:

Tell me about how you made the transition from home studio to opening up Lakehouse. What kind of projects had you been working on leading up to that point?

Jon Leidersdorff: I was recording and developing local artists that started to see some success and working with newer bands that I met through the industry. Some of my producer friends also were bringing artists in to work there. And from that, the studio and I got very busy. I realized that I wasn’t going to be able to be involved with more projects if I didn’t have a larger commercial space.

What makes the design and layout (of the studio, specifically), unique and what can artists look forward to getting out of it in a session?

For the new recording studios I wanted to have everything I was previously missing. I wanted space where every musician in the group could see each other and set up the rig of their dreams to record with simultaneously. I wanted everyone to have the sound that they wanted hear and to be able to play together and see each other. I wanted more of a live performance for tracking.

I really missed hearing the magic of when the entire group plays together. The whole group playing at the same time really pushes each musician individually and has a huge impact on the composition. I also wanted it to sound amazing in the space.

We hired WSDG. John Storyk has done this thousands of times before and I realized that there would be no substitute for that type of experience. His rooms sound great. One thing that I hear often from the producers and artists that come through our studios is that they love the feeling in the space. And how we have so much of the gear that they never get to play or that they just see as virtual instruments or plug-ins. We spend a lot of time and energy making sure that we have a lot of unique  and vintage instruments that the musicians can use to feel more creative.

Outside of just the studio, elaborate a bit on the overall complex that Lakehouse is situated in and its significance to the neighborhood.

We are located in the downtown of Asbury Park, New Jersey. The city has an amazing musical heritage. Early days with Arthur Pryor and the John Philip Sousa big bands, the west side jazz scene of the 1930’s and ’40’s, the Jersey Shore rock scene of the 1970’s and ’80’s and the amazing punk scene at the Lanes in recent years. People believe in music here. They trust it, they support it, they live it. You can see it everywhere. It’s a great place to be when you come to record. There are great art galleries, restaurants and atmosphere, live music venues and of course there’s the boardwalk and the Atlantic Ocean. It’s a great backdrop to ignite the creative flow.  

In our building we have Russo Music, the largest and coolest independent music store in NJ. They have the best equipment and do repairs and set ups on site. It’s really helpful for the musicians that are recording here. There is an amazing music academy with very progressive programming. Most of the teachers have really cool gigs and credits.

Monmouth University has their music industry program and record label here as well. They bring really great guests here.

We also have our own small DIY venue. It’s the home for the Asbury Park Music Foundation. They have a killer PA in there and anyone coming through town can book their own show. I’ve seen a lot of great acts there. They are a nonprofit that do tremendous work for the community here.

There is a great photographer and videographer Andrew Holtz. Upstairs is Bands on a Budget who do merchandise for so many different artists. There’s CoWerks, a great shared office space.

There are also some great well-known producers will have their own mix rooms on the premises. It really creates a great community having so many different creative people in the same space.

What inspired you to start Lakehouse Music Academy? What was the reaction from residents?

The idea for the music Academy really came from need. So many of the artists that I was working with really needed support. They needed experts around them and educators who could help them to accomplish their goals. Having relevant mentors opens up so many possibilities. There are really great programs at the Academy that help the students directly and specifically with their aims.

We are fortunate to be in an area where so much of the music industry lives and plays. We have some of the biggest artists and music industry professionals teach at our Academy. The community has been the best supporters. We have a huge student body now in just a few years.

Have you been able to establish a sort of ‘path’ between the academy and the studio?  

We have set up programming that helps young musicians develop into songwriters and artists. There are programs that teach songwriting, audio engineering and connect the students to the music industry. They even have their own record label.

Between watching students come in the doors to the academy, bands through the studio, and everything in between, what makes you excited about Asbury Park’s music scene?

It’s a very exciting time to be in Asbury Park. The music scene is really turning into a ‘music community’. There is so much going on and there are many great collaborations happening everywhere.

It makes you feel good to see these artists helping each other and taking it to the next level.

What inside advice would you give to independent artists who are getting ready to step into a professional recording studio for the first time?

Ask yourself what you want to accomplish. What do you want to sound like? It’s important to find a studio and someone who understands what you’re trying to get done.

Studio Spotlight: Sine Studios’ Matt Teacher On Recording & Running a Philanthropy-Driven Label

In continuing with our ‘Studio Spotlight’ series that aims to highlight cool recording studios all over, this month we chatted with Matt Teacher, co-founder of Philadelphia’s Sine Studios. Matt started Sine Studios over ten years ago in the Rittenhouse Historic District with business partner Mike Lawson shortly after graduating from Berklee College of Music.

As the duo built up a reputation around town among clients across genres, they went on to launch The Giving Groove – an “artist-friendly, socially conscious” record label in an effort to help musicians they were passion about realize their musical vision while simultaneously giving back to the community. With half of all album proceeds being divvied up between the artists and a music-related non-profit of the artist’s choice, The Giving Groove is showing how members of the music community can make a difference across the board.

Read our interview with Matt below to learn more about his experience, Sine Studios, and The Giving Groove. Be sure to check out all Sine Studios has to offer in the way of mixing and recording, too!

You’ve been running Sine for 10 years now. Tell us a little bit about how you jumped into engineering and what led up to you opening your own studio.

Matt Teacher: My business parter, Mike Lawson, and I have been playing music together since 7th grade. From the first time we began making music together we were interested in learning how to record it. This started with a 4-track cassette recorder in Mike’s parents basement, then moved to a digital 8-track, then the Digi001.

By the time we were graduating high school we both knew we wanted to open a recording studio so we both went to school for it—Mike studying audio technology at American University and I went to Berklee in Boston. We both graduated in 2003 and returned to Philly and began working on finding our space, securing a loan, and finding someone to help us build our space. Mike and I both worked doing sound for film companies as we built Sine and in 2006 we opened our doors.

In terms of overall design, how is Sine unique? What can artists look forward to getting out of the space as a result of the way it was built?

The most important ethos of our studio is that we wanted it to feel like home, but allow our artists to be very productive at the same time. We were incredibly lucky to find Obie O’Brien to design our space and Bruce Slater to do the construction, both of whom had previously worked together building Bon Jovi’s studio, Sanctuary II. Our studio is in a turn-of-the-century brownstone in Philly’s Rittenhouse Historic District.

We gutted the 2nd floor, which was 2 apartments, and built our control room and live room. We used layers of leaded drywall, closed-cell foam, icynene, and sound-stop board to make the floor and walls very dense so that when we record the room holds the low frequencies and allows the microphones to pick them up in an even, well-rounded manner. There are no parallel surfaces in our live room and all the walls are curved or slanted so that it produces very even (but live) frequency response.

We didn’t want our room to be dead so we used very minimal treatment—mostly on the ceiling above where the drum kit is usually set up. Being musicians ourselves we have collected a lot of different instruments, amps, and toys that our clients are free to be inspired by and use during their sessions.

Philadelphia has become an even more prominent music city in recent years, whether it’s hip hop, garage rock, or anything in between. What excites you most about about the scene in 2017?

Having grown up in Philly and then returning here in 2003 I’ve seen the music scene dwindle and surge. When we first moved back a lot of venues were closing, studio options weren’t what they were in Philadelphia’s heyday, and it kind of felt like the scene was falling apart. Luckily, that didn’t last too long though. Over the proceeding years a lot of artists started making a name for themselves, whether it was Dr Dog and War on Drugs or Meek Mill, a lot Philly artists started making a name for themselves.

Today I am most excited about Philadelphia not only being a home to great artists, but also its return to a thriving industry town. I want Philadelphia to be a destination, not just for bands and artists, but for record labels and studios as well, and it’s incredibly exciting to see it happening.

Building on that, what kind of a role do you see Sine playing in the independent music scene around Philadelphia?

I love that many Philadelphia artists call Sine Studios home. We are here to provide a comfortable, creative space for one and all. We also provide a network of musicians and industry professionals and love to make introductions and connections for our artists.

A couple of years ago you started The Giving Groove record label. What inspired this move after so many years of running the studio?

After running Sine Studios for 10 years we wanted to expand into something that could help the artists we were working with. So many times we’d watch as an artist would finish their project and then struggle to get it out into the world in a meaningful way. Making and recording music comes naturally to most artists, but the business side of it is often not something they’re well-versed in.

It can be very difficult, especially when competing for tours and radio play with major labels who are throwing serious money behind their acts. That is why we started the Giving Groove: to have the ability to help artists get their art out into the world and enable them to give back to the music community that fostered them.

With 50% of the profits going to artists and 50% going to a music-based non-profit, what sparked the idea for this business model?

I was inspired by my dad and step-mother who had recently launched a cookbook publishing company, Burgess Lea Press. Their model was this: 50% of all after-tax profits would go to the author; the remaining 50% would be donated to a food-related charity. It needed to be adapted for the music industry, but this model is what would become the core of the Giving Groove ethos.

This model feels like something that really appeals to artists of this generation. What has the reaction been like from the arts community overall?

To date artist reactions have been overwhelmingly positive.  They feel as though they are getting their fair share, something that the mainstream music industry has always struggled with, and they appreciate that the label enables them to give back to the music community in a meaningful way. In the year and a half from when we came up with the model to when we launched we vetted our concept by everyone we had developed relationships with through the studio.

Everyone from Harry Weinger (Universal/Motown) to Aaron Weiss (mewithoutYou) to Jon Bon Jovi have been incredibly supportive and are routing for us to make the Giving Groove a success.

What kind of future plans do you have for The Giving Groove?

We plan to keep expanding our roster with a diverse range of artists and allowing them to support a growing network of music-related charities. For us it’s not about putting out a certain genre of music; it’s about the label’s mission and I believe this mission should be inclusive of all styles of music. As our branding grows we hope to continue to sign both well-stablished acts and up-and-comers.

Back to the studio a bit: What inside advice would you give to independent artists who are getting ready to step into a professional recording studio for the first time?

When I speak to an artist getting ready to head into the studio I always stress the importance of pre-production. Whether they’re working with a producer or not there are certain steps that need to happen before they set foot in the studio to record. For a band they need be well-rehearsed, but not to the point where the songs aren’t exciting to them anymore.

The songs have to be second nature to all the musicians so they don’t find themselves working out fundamental parts in the studio—everyone should just be focused on capturing the best performance and not just getting a passable take. They need to be able to play the material to a click even if they make the conscious decision not to track to it.

If they are going for mainstream pop success they need to take a hard look at the songs’ narratives and make sure their story (or if the lyric is more eccentric: “vibe”) comes through to the listener—artists always know what they mean when they write something, but making sure that comes through to the listener is key.

Studio Spotlight: Degraw Sound’s Ben Rice On the Brooklyn Recording Landscape & Degraw Fest

Creating, releasing, and promoting your music as an independent artist requires a lot of moving parts and team members. For artists who are at the stage in their career when they’ve moved out of the home studio and are ready to dedicate some of their budget to sessions with an engineer, there’s plenty to take into consideration.

That’s why we’re opening up the floor to highlight some recording studios in our backyard of New York City and beyond each month on the TuneCore Blog! Studio owners and engineers work with indie artists who use TuneCore for distribution and more every day, so it only makes sense for us to give them a platform to talk about the cool stuff happening in the control room.

To kick it off, we chatted with Ben Rice, owner of Degraw Sound located in the Gowanus neighborhood of Brooklyn. Ben’s been active in the music scene since he was in his teens, and the studio is in it’s fifth year of existence. Next weekend, on June 3rd, Ben and his cohorts are throwing the inaugural “Degraw Fest” – a mini full-day music festival taking place at Littlefield just down the road from the studio to be filled with bands, beer and food.

Learn more about what makes Degraw Sound special, and if you’re an NYC-based TuneCore Artist, make sure to check out Degraw Fest and say hello!

First, give us a little bit of your background as a musician/producer in New York City.

Ben Rice, Owner:I’m originally from Brooklyn — like I actually grew up here. My family lived in Park Slope in the late 80’s and early 90’s and then we moved out to Ditmas Park. Growing up I was obsessed with baseball and music and as luck would have it, music won out!

The first job I ever got when I was a teenager was working in a recording studio. It was this place called Clinton Recording Studios which was

Ben Rice

one of the last major facilities in New York. I did all the fun jobs like cleaning the bathroom and making coffee and that was my introduction to studio life. I loved the feeling of being in the studio, going in and turning on the lights in the morning and watching their huge live room light up. The old console and racks of gear fascinated me. I would work there during the days over the summer or after school and then go home and play with my Tasman 4 track and make demos of the songs I was writing.

I played in bands and toured and got to experience the early 2000’s music scene here in NYC, which was really incredible. During that time I started producing records for other bands on the scene, and at a certain point I decided that I wanted to focus solely on producing and went all in on building a studio.

If I may say, it’s a beautiful studio. What went into it’s design and how did you keep artists in mind during its construction?

Thanks Kevin, I appreciate that man. When I set out to build Degraw Sound I wanted to create a space that artists would feel inspired and comfortable in. I wanted it to feel warm and inviting —kind of like an extension of the whisky bars that me and my friends liked to hang out at, almost like there was a secret back door that would lead you into another room that somehow magically was full of sick gear.

I met with a few different studio designers and through a couple different friends I got connected with a guy named Dave Ellis who had built some beautiful spaces around Brooklyn. When I met Dave it was instantly clear to me that he understood my vision for the studio and he just seemed like a cool guy — he had a sick car and liked a lot of the same music that I did. I put a lot of trust in him to take my idea and turn it into a reality. In a lot of ways I think of him as the studio’s “producer”, meaning he had the experience, skills and tools to turn my idea into something tangible.

How do you feel that Degraw Sound contributes to the Brooklyn/NYC musical landscape? In what ways do you collaborate or connect with artists outside of production and engineering?

I think after five years of making music here we’re starting to feel that we’ve become part of the city’s musical landscape, which is a really cool feeling. Growing up in New York you learn about all the different studios in the city and to have Degraw get to the point it has where it’s become part of that conversation and musicians think of us as a place to come make records is pretty special.

The artists that we work with here have become like family. When you spend countless hours in-studio with someone collaborating on a creative project you wind up getting pretty close with them.

One of the things I appreciate most about producing records is you get to be a part of significant moments in other peoples’ lives. That often extends beyond the studio; for instance, I just got back from Austin, Texas from my buddy Will’s wedding. He’s in a band Elliot & the Ghost and we’ve made some awesome records together at Degraw Sound.

Tell us more about how you came to organize Degraw Fest, and what are you looking forward to most about it?

A couple months ago Harper and I were breaking down gear after a session and somehow we wound up riffing on the idea of putting together a show with a few of the artists that we were working with. When we’re brainstorming the ideas can grow pretty quickly and before we knew it the idea had evolved into a full day mini music festival!

The timing just felt right to do something like this. This month is our fifth anniversary so it seemed like a fun way to get everyone together that has been a part of building Degraw and putting it on the map. Now that all the heavy lifting and planning is done I’m just looking forward to hanging with everyone. When I think about the perfect early summer Saturday it involves good friends, music, beer and food – and I think we’ve got all those boxes checked! (Ed. note – buy tickets for that here!)

Given that as a business owner you’re always looking to foster a community with your neighbors, do you feel Degraw Fest will help enhance those efforts?

Oh yeah definitely. Julie and Scott over at Littlefield (where we’re hosting Degraw Fest) have always been great to us. They were super welcoming when we moved into the neighborhood and we’ve built a great relationship with them over the years. They’ve been here for a decade now and are such a big part of the scene and community that is growing here in Gowanus so we’re really pumped to be working with them on this!

Everyone that we’ve talked to about Degraw Fest has loved the idea. Marshall and Eric who own Braven Brewing in Bushwick jumped on board to help sponsor the festival. Cheech A Cini’s, a local Italian food truck and Yankees fans, are going to be joining us, too!

A lot of the artists already know each other from seeing each other around the studio or meeting at some of the other parties that we’ve thrown, so I think getting everyone together is going to feel like a really fun family reunion.

How do you recommend that your fellow studio owners/engineers take steps to connect with artists in a similar fashion as you have with Degraw Fest?

For me it’s really about having fun and doing things that you’re pumped about. I have a ton of respect for all the studio owners in this city. It’s a tough business and we all put in long hours, so anytime there’s an opportunity to do something like this that’s a little different and can help the artists that you make music with I think you have to jump on it.

What do you think makes Degraw Sound unique in terms of how studios in New York operate?

To me the thing that makes Degraw Sound unique is the people who work here. Gian, Harper and myself… we’re a bunch of weirdos who love making records and are obsessed with every aspect of it.

I think that we’re bridging the gap between commercial studios and independent producers. We can each function independently as producers and collectively as a team. We have a really beautiful and well-built professional recording studio here that is flexible and can accommodate whatever type of project people bring to us.

What we’ve found over the past few years is that the majority of the projects that we’re working on are those where the artist will hire one of us, or a couple of us, to produce their record and help them take the project from start to finish. This just seems to work out best because it allows us to really invest ourselves in the records that we’re making and help artists create music that’s authentic and realize their vision and potential.

If you HAD to choose, what’s your favorite piece of gear or recording equipment that Degraw Sound boasts?

Oh man, that’s a tough one… I mean I have my “desert island” list of toys… I love our Trident console, it’s a great British desk and it’s super fun to work on. I’d box that up and put it on a boat and take it with me. My rack of 1176 compressors and Pultecs has become a staple. I have a couple Jazzmasters that I’ll never get rid of, and we just got a Mellotron which is probably the coolest instrument ever!

What inside advice would you give to independent artists who are getting ready to step into a professional recording studio for the first time?

Find a producer that you dig and who loves your music and let them help you. No matter what stage of your career you’re at I think this is key.

Whether you grew up listening to The Beatles or Michael Jackson one of the key ingredients to those records is that there was someone who helped foster the artists’ creativity and develop those sounds.