5 Reasons Teaming Up With Another Band Means a Mutual Boost on Tour

[Editors Note: This blog was written by Jhoni Jackson, a music journalist and Puerto Rico-based venue owner.]

 

Heading out on tour with your band has the potential to bring everyone in it closer together. Co-existing and constantly collaborating, playing together night after night—becoming a tight-knit troupe in the process is almost inevitable. But why not double the bonds you could solidify by bringing another group into the picture? Organizing a joint tour means you’ll connect with even more fellow musicians—and that’s not the only benefit, either.

The notion that there’s strength in numbers is inarguably true for independent and DIY bands. Touring is one of the toughest parts of the gig; in that effort especially, you’ll accomplish more working together.

1. You’re sharing fans

Even if you hail from the same city, chances are you don’t share the exact same fanbase with any other band. That means pairing up in any capacity is an opportunity for exposure to new listeners; touring together is a maximized version of that.

Whenever possible, tag your tour-mates in related promo and other posts—and they should do the same, of course. Collaborate as much as you can: Both bands should be reflected in promo material like tour posters, promo videos announcing dates, Facebook events, and so forth. Every time you promote together is another chance to appeal to each other’s fans.

One result of two separate camps collectively pushing the promo could be increased show attendance, and there’s some strategy within that for increased effectiveness. If either group has toured before, include spots in your schedule that one has played and the other hasn’t; the band visiting for a second time can help carry the newcomer in terms of pull. Even if both bands are embarking on first-ever tours, though, you can also use Insights on your Facebook page to learn about the demographics of your fans. Their locations could help you choose which cities you visit, or what kind of marketing effort will work best based on your existing (or yet-to-be-built) audiences.

2. You can pool resources

Lug around less by sharing gear, particularly the bulkier items like amps and drums. Go in on groceries together to save money, and share the burden of cooking and preparing meals by rotating responsibilities. Depending on how big your group is, you might even travel together in a single vehicle, so there’s only one gas tank to fill to be split among all of you. And when you’re reaching out to friends and acquaintances as you line up places to crash on tour, more musicians in the mix means a greater potential number of generous hosts.

3. Two networks are better than one

Maybe one of you knows a booking agent in a particular city and the other doesn’t, or perhaps you’ve established a rapport with certain outlets that your touring mates haven’t. Knowing the right people in any given city can be a boon to a DIY tour. Whatever the effort, your connections combined are obviously doubly powerful.

4. Collaborating sparks creativity

Working together on any type of creative strategy, the sharing of influences and obscure discoveries, even casual conversations about art and music—something special happens when separate imaginations meet. New ideas pop up seemingly from nowhere; you gain fresh perspectives about other people’s work and your own.

Creativity fuels creativity, and in the close quarters of tour life, there’s no doubt you’ll find inspiration in collaborating—and practically living together—throughout the trip.

5. Through the camaraderie, you strengthen community bonds

Touring together is one of those shared experiences that facilitates deep connections and meaningful, lifelong friendships. The struggles, triumphs, exhaustion—incredible shows, bad turnouts, strategizing for press, the perpetual uphill battle of financial sustainment—are all collectively endured or celebrated.

Camaraderie develops naturally, and that, in turn, helps you strengthen your overall ties to your scene, whether that community is local or built around a genre and spread throughout different cities.

iHeartRadio Expands Services For Users

Hot on the heels of announcing 100 million registered users, iHeartRadio recently released their newest services, iHeartRadio Plus and iHeartRadio All Access (powered by Napster) and we’re excited to announce that these services are now available for TuneCore Artists to distribute their music to!

iHeartRadio already offers listeners access to over 750 live streams of radio stations across the U.S., as well as the ability to build a playlist or ‘user-generated’ radio station based on an artist of their choosing. Here’s a look at how the new services stand to impact users and artists:

  • With iHeartRadio Plus, users will have access to offline listening, unlimited skips and replays, and customized radio stations for $4.99/month;
  • With iHeartRadio All Access, users get a traditional on-demand streaming platform complete with a catalog millions of songs (via Napster) for $9.99/month.
  • For TuneCore Artists, both of these new services open up the opportunity for discovery and democratic listening among iHeartRadio subscribers!

What does that mean for TuneCore Artists who have already distributed to iHeartRadio and Napster?

Since your music is already on iHeartRadio and Napster (fka Rhapsody), you’re good! You do not need to take any action to make your current active releases available on iHeartRadio Plus or iHeartRadio All Access. Any fans who search for your release(s) on iHeartRadio should be able to find them on both of these services.

For information about getting your music on iHeartRadio, learn more here.

To add your current active releases to iHeartRadio and/or Napster, head over to your Store Manager.

TuneCore Artists know they can always look to us to offer them a plethora of stores and streaming services to send their new releases to. We know that independent music is something that fans seek globally, and we strive to make sure that artists can take advantage of all available outlets in order to build their fan base.

This is a big step for iHeartRadio and their listeners, and we’re excited about what this means for our artists moving forward.

3 Easy Tips To Consider Before Pitching to Music Bloggers

[Editor’s NoteThis blog was written by Janelle Rogers, the founder of  Green Light Go Publicity, a music PR firm which helps up-and-coming musicians reach their audience.]

 

You found a list online entitled, “100 Blogs You Should Contact Now.” You’re ready to start emailing those 100 blogs about your album right away, because like the list says, those are all blogs you should contact now.

There’s just one small problem. They might not be.

Lists like those are often a generic compiling of the most read blogs or the blogs that are most receptive to unknown bands. They don’t delineate between a blog focusing on hip hop and a blog focusing on folk.

Those lists are a great starting point to find the blog right for you, but there are a few steps you need to take first.

1. Determine the Genre

First and foremost, you want to make sure they cover your genre before you reach out to the blog. Often a first glance of the site will make it glaringly clear if you are the right fit. If you’re an Americana band and the site is clearly only covering electronic or dream pop, you remove it from your list. In some cases, it’s not as clear at first glance. In those cases, start by finding a column that could be a fit for your band. Then look at the last five bands they’ve covered.

Do any of them fall within your genre? If not, remove them from the list as well. You may still be thinking, but it looks like they cover all genres, so there’s a chance they could cover my music as well. If you’ve looked at five articles and none of them have covered your genre, you’ll have a less than 20% chance of coverage on that blog. That low rate of return is neither worth your time or the blog you’re targeting. If at least one of those articles represent your genre, add the blog and move on to the next step.

2. Determine the Musician Career Level

When my music pr company, Green Light Go Publicity, is determining if a blog will cover a band at the level we’re working, we first break the stages down into five categories. Those categories are unknown, emerging, buzz, indie established, established and superstar. As a general rule, if you’re unsure of a band’s level you can look at Facebook as a guide.

For instance, we categorize unknown bands as less than 2k Facebook likes. Emerging have between 2-5K. If you fall into either of those categories, you want to make sure at least one of the five bands who were just covered by the blog are also within the same range as you. Like the above example, if they only cover established bands, the chances of you being covered are really low if you’re an unknown band.

This is also why it’s really important to look for columns that could be a fit for you at the forefront. A high profile site like Stereogum may only cover established and celebrity musicians in their news features, but could potentially premiere an unknown artist whose music they really love.

3. Determine the Best Contact

Once you’ve found a site that fits within the first two parameters, you want to determine the best contact at the outlet. Start with a writer who wrote the article or articles featuring a band matching your career level and genre. If you want to get even closer, look at writers who have covered artists similar to your sound.

Add that writer or writers to your list while noting the specific article so you can individually tailor your message when you reach out. If the writer isn’t clearly noted, then take a look at the contacts on the contact page and see if you can find the editor who best fits the column or type of coverage who fits your band.

That’s it. It’s really that simple to target the right contact. By taking a little extra time at the beginning to determine who would be most interested in your band, you’ll be able to invest time appropriately in those who’d most likely turn it into coverage.

Facebook’s New Reach Objective: A Game Changer for Touring Musicians

[Editors Note: This is a guest blog post written by Don Bartlett, owner of No Door Agency, an Austin, TX-based boutique management and marketing agency. Don also hosts a seminar titled “Facebook Marketing For Musicians. Be sure to read his TuneCore Blog article on maximizing your Facebook ads on an indie budget.]

From it’s earliest days Facebook has used its powerful data algorithms to deliver incredibly well-targeted ads. It was a dream for most advertisers. They wouldn’t just put your ad in front of your target audience, they’d put it in front of the specific members of that audience who were most likely to engage with the ad. The success of this approach changed the entire landscape of advertising, and advertisers reaped the benefits. For musicians trying to promote tour dates, though, this presented a problem.

Bands are in a relatively unique position, from an advertising perspective. In each tour city we have small but very valuable target group of people we want to reach. It’s critical that we reach ALL of that group, not just the ones who might be prone to engaging with Facebook posts. If we’ve got 500 fans in New York City, we want all 500 to see the ad for our show.

Until now, the best objectives were “Page Post Engagement” or “Website Clicks” which deliver to those people who historically took those actions when viewing ads. In many cases that left a decent chunk of your fans out.

In late 2016 Facebook rolled out a new objective that solves this problem. When you choose the “Reach” objective you are now functionally telling Facebook that you want to reach as many people in your target audience as possible. After a few months of testing we’ve found that ads with the Reach objective perform significantly better for these small but valuable targets.

Note that that when you’re advertising to larger, non-fan target audiences….fans of similar bands, for example…you’re still better off using the “Page Post Engagement” or “Website Clicks” objective.

Another significant advantage to the Reach objective is that for the first time Facebook is allowing you to put a limit on how often people see your ads. Even an ad for your favorite band’s show can get annoying if it’s popping up in your newsfeed 4 times a day. This new feature lets you define an amount of time that a user will not see your ad again after viewing it.

It’s a very helpful tool that provides an extra degree of control to what your fans are seeing from your page. A good rule of thumb is to build in a frequency cap of at least two days for most campaigns.

Taken together these two new features provide a huge improvement to the tour marketing arsenal. Facebook ads have always been a one of the most effective ways to reach fans in a given city, but the effectiveness was often limited by their optimization algorithms. With the “Reach” objective we now have a concrete way to reach all of them.

5 Tips to Prepare for SXSW

[Editors Note: This blog was written by W. Tyler Allen, a music and marketing consultant and contributor to the TuneCore Blog.]

SXSW is one of those events that has become synonymous with the music industry. The festival and conference is one of the best known events in the US that centers around technology and music.

But did you catch that? Festival and conference? It’s even in their name.

While SXSW is known internationally- many creatives still approach SXSW as just a festival, and pass up the networking opportunities and more that exist on the conference end.

Here’s a truth – it’s not bashing anyone – but it’s just an observation:

Many artists hand out CDs on the corner, or post on social media – hoping that by chance – the “right people” will just stroll into their showcase. Maybe it’s a writer, a label head, a music supervisor. But this is all by chance.

However… there’s networking events all week, where these “important people” actually go to meet artists like you. So why are you standing on the street corner, or tweeting about your event – when you can be getting actual facetime with these individuals – inviting them in person? Or better yet – you can pitch them a few weeks before SXSW (which we’ll discuss in this article).

I discussed SXSW last year in an article on the lessons I learned taking an indie label to SXSW. I spoke about the music supervisor I met loading in gear who landed us an MTV spot, I spoke about the issues in pay-for-play gigs at SXSW, and more.

The event can be a huge boost for your career – but you need to know where to focus. There’s a lot going on – events, crowds, speakers and showcases – here’s how to drown out the fluff, and properly prepare for SXSW.

TIP 1: BUILD A MEDIA LIST + CONTACT IN ADVANCE.

As I said earlier – why wait for the right person to walk down the street, when you can genuinely target them and reach out to them before hand? If you work for any large company – what do they do before a conference?

They (or their publicists) compile a media list to see what writers and reporters will be attending the conference. Next they email the writers before the event – inviting them to their booth.

Now replace the word “reporters” with music writers/A&Rs/management teams – and the word “booth” with your showcase – and now you’ve cracked the code.

What if you don’t have a showcase? That’s fine – still introduce yourself for maybe coffee or drinks at a mutual show.

Unfortunately, SXSW doesn’t have a publically available media list like some conferences. However with some resources – or some good ole’ fashioned Googling – you can make it work.

First – check out tools like PitchZen – they research media connections on a customized basis, all humans, not robots or directories. They can surely assist you with customized lists for SXSW. They help write the pitches, too.

Secondly – if that’s not a route you wish to take – simply search which writers have covered SXSW in years past, and start compiling a list. The list should have their name, outlet, and a link to the article they wrote. This list is just for your reference.

Go deeper and go to ZoomInfo (for emails) or even Twitter to find info for other industry folks that may have attended in past years. Add those to the list, too.

Lastly – hit ’em up! Send them a short email telling them about yourself, your showcase (or work) and a link to your EPK. Keep it casual and quick – but also give them resources to make them want to come meet you.

TIP 2: YOU HAVE $250 TO SPEND … BUY ONTO A SHOWCASE, OR BUY CONFERENCE PASSES?

Conference passes.

Look, I mentioned this in my past article – there’s a difference between playing at SXSW at an official showcase and playing during SXSW at an unofficial one.

An official showcase is one that SXSW approves of, they help market – and they give passes to media, and promotes official shows to media (and other influencers). SXSW official showcases will never ask you for money to perform. SXSW official showcases are not pay-for-play.

An unofficial showcase, is usually a nearby venue, who is renting out their space to a promoter or someone else. Usually they charge you money (to perform your own work.. yep), and are just looking to make a quick buck off of hungry artists.

Side Note: Do good unofficial showcases exist? Yes. Especially ones that don’t charge. Some big brands have unofficial showcases (and they don’t charge artists) – they just likely missed a deadline with SXSW, or some other technicality.

So – let’s say you are going to Austin with $250. You can upgrade your passes for a conference, or pay to have a 15 minute set at an unofficial showcase.

Go to the conference.

These unofficial shows usually have 30+ artists performing in a single hour, you can’t sell merch and they aren’t well put together. They also aren’t marketed by SXSW.

If you’re short for cash, spend that on the conference. There’s networking events, there’s talks from music industry execs and panels from marketing experts. That knowledge is worth much more than performing for 30 people and never seeing that return on investment.

TIP 3: SPEND MONEY ON MARKETING/EDUCATION NOT CDS.

If you go to SXSW – you’ll notice that the streets are littered with tossed aside CDs. Now – as an indie artist – you should know that every CD laying on the ground is money.

Literally dollars upon dollars – wasted. Laying on the streets – for the sanitation department to sweep up the next day.

So – as you prepare for SXSW, think wisely about what will make the best investment. Is it buying onto shows? Pressing 100 CDs? Or something a bit more direct.

For instance – instead of pressing 100 CDs – how about spending that money on Facebook or Twitter ads – targeting people who follow, or have tweeted about SXSW in the past?

Or – instead of pressing CDs – how about investing in a publicist that can link you with reporters directly that week, instead of hoping one falls in your lap?

Or – and to repeat myself now for the third time – instead of pressing CDs, how about attending the conference and meet with decision makers face-to-face?

TIP 4: FIND OTHER ARTISTS WHO ARE PERFORMING + LINK UP!

Hey! Under the veneer of labels and A&Rs and all this smoke and fanciness – the power largely still resides in the artists. That why services like TuneCore, Landr and other tools are so powerful.

You may not be able to track down the super-busy Billboard magazine editor at SXSW, or the management company CEO – who’s running around checking on all her acts.

However, you’ll likely be able to easily connect with other artists. They’re usually pretty open to it, too. In fact, I’ve been part of and seen many financially successful tours or just co-promo situations when artists come together.

Even if it’s grabbing a beer before someone elses show – go and meet other artists. You may find a new touring partner, or even a new manager – or at the very least, swap stories and learn.

Check the SXSW artists page – or even your Twitter feed to see which artists are headed to Austin, and see if you can meet up – or even just go support their show.

TIP 5: OF COURSE – GET YOUR MARKETING RIGHT.

If all goes well – you’re going to be sending people to the Googles or to your social media. So – ensure that all outlets are active. Ensure there’s a good mixture of music/fun/and promo posts on all your pages.

Also make sure your EPK is up to date – upload any and all photos, videos and more. Also – research what makes a “quality” EPK, too. No more PDFs, folks. Web-based, mobile friendly EPKs are the wave.

As I mentioned before – spend money on social media ads, and build up your numbers and presence while in the city. I can guarantee there’s very “big name” artists at SXSW that aren’t geotargeting ads to Austin for their shows.

So, do that.

Ensure your digital presence is right – and that people are aware of your physical presence at SXSW.

Quick checklist:

– All social channels are current and active.
– An updated EPK.
– Social media ads – geotargeted to Austin during the event.
– Social media posts scheduled when you’re on the road – so you don’t have to manually post them.
– Custom graphics for your performances.

BONUS TIP: ENJOY AUSTIN.

Yep – let’s get a little cheesy.

I had a former client of mine hit me up recently. We designed a merch campaign together – and he’s making some good income on merch. But he also knows I’m very anti pay-for-play.

He let me know that he’ll be in Austin for the first time for SXSW. He bought tickets to attend a few networking events – but he asked about all the pay-for-play offers he was getting.

It was cheap – especially for his budget, and two of his friends were performing at the unofficial event. He also had meetings set up with editors, and a booking agent. All meetings he set up beforehand.

So I told him – I don’t advocate pay-for-play – but if you have meetings with writers, potential booking agents, if you’re spending time with artist friends – if you are going to the conference – spend your change on playing that 30 minute set, and then go enjoy Austin and the SXSW scene.

Artists are lucky to get to see and experience parts of the country that folks in an office can’t. So – get out there. Austin is one of the most unique cities in the country, and the live music capital of the world. So – why not? Pencil in time to go to the SXSW conference events, to meet with fellow artists – but also get out there, , the culture, (the bats) and everything else that makes Austin and SXSW great.