New Music Friday: April 21, 2017

TuneCore Artists are releasing tons of new music every day. Each week we check out the new TuneCore releases and choose a few at random to feature on the blog.

Is your hit next?

Follow Music Made Me – a Spotify playlist that’s updated every Friday with new releases from TuneCore Artists – stream it below!


Changing
Devan Dubois
Alternative, Pop


Older Men & Whiskey
Chyyanna Lee
Pop, Country


Monument
Lions Lions

Rock, Alternative


Goals
Nate Good

Hip Hop/Rap


Treat You Better
Throw the Fight

Rock, Alternative


In Dank We Trust

Black the Ripper
Hip Hop/Rap, New Age


Battles
Rita Springer
Christian/Gospel


86
Infected Rain

Rock


Passionfruit
Cimorelli

Pop


Addiction Kills
Jelly Roll

Hip Hop/Rap


Change: The Lost Record
Josh Thompson

Country


Black Hole Sun
Break of Reality

Rock, Instrumental

Wednesday Video Diversion: April 19, 2017

Did you know that rock and roll behemoths QUEEN were once called SMILE? Well, they were. And in on this day back in 1969 they made their debut in England as a band at the Revolution Club. Only four years before, the Beatles dropped their single “Ticket To Ride”! What do these two things have in common? Nothing. They’re just two cool British rock and roll facts from the same day in history! As always we’re here mid-week to distract you with weird trivia and an awesome line-up of TuneCore Artist music videos – so now that we’ve covered one-half of that, enjoy the other half below:

 

Rathborne, “Last Forgiven”

BLAKE, “Flexin”

CARFACE, “Playing Pretend”

VHS Collection, “Wide Awake”

Cimorelli, “Passionfruit (Drake Cover)”

Julie Hanse, “It’s Not”

Toni Romiti, “Imma Dog Too”

Black the Ripper, “Light Up Everywhere (Uber Everywhere Remix)”

Jessica Frech, “Where I Come From”


Sono Oto, “A Way to Stay Away”

4 Major Live Music Trends Changing The Industry This Year

[Editors Note: This blog was written by Rachel Grate and originally appeared on the Eventbrite Blog.]

 

We’re just one month into 2017 (ed. – this was originally published in February of 2017), and it’s already proven to be a year of big changes — and the live music industry is no exception to the rule.

To stay on top of your game in a shifting landscape, you need a firm grip on the music trends that will shift the landscape in 2017. But don’t take it from us — take it from the nineteen industry pros we interviewed, including Newport Folk Festival, Afropunk, National Sawdust, and more.

Here’s how tastemakers predict the live music industry will change in 2017 — and how you can use those trends to protect your business.

1. Activism will revive the live music community

“Music has recently been more about escapism than activism,” says Jay Sweet, festival director and talent buyer for the Newport Festivals Foundation. But with major political changes coming in 2017, fans may be looking to their favorite artists to take a stance. “I’m excited because I think this could be the year where musicians could… try to affect positive change through music,” Sweet says.

Matthew Morgan, the co-founder of Afropunk, believes fans will look to live music as an opportunity to make sense of the world around them. “We’re in line for some really great art over the next four years, [and] what we’re doing is going to be even more important,” Morgan says. “So many people are looking for things that are positive, that give them something meaningful in their lives.”

“We’re in line for some really great art over the next 4 years.” — Matthew Morgan of @afropunk

In this quest for self-expression, fans and artists will use live performances as an opportunity to build community around shared causes. “Festivals are a place for people to congregate safely — a place to share a common, collective experience,” Sweet says. It will be up to independent promoters and producers to create these safe spaces for activism.

2. Immersive theater will influence live music performances

From popular events like The Speakeasy in San Francisco to the topic of breakout HBO show Westworld, immersive theater made a big splash in 2016. These shows make audience members a part of the performance, and this year, we’ll see their influence begin to make live music performances more multidimensional.

“The world of immersive theater is about to explode,” says Nick Panama, the founder of Cantora. “We’ll be seeing a lot more experiential storytelling, and its influence on live music.”

Panama predicts live shows will expand the storytelling from the music itself to other senses. Instead of relying solely on audio cues or a screen behind them to tell a story, performers will begin to activate the entire room or stadium with immersive sensory details. Using a variety of new technologies, fans will become part of an alternate reality for the duration of the show.

3. Venues will band together to establish more sustainable economics

With rising rent prices in cities across the country, venues are facing a serious financial challenge in 2017.

“Venues will either buy the land they sit on, or they’ll move,” says Brendon Anthony, the director of the Texas Music Office. “We’re not going to see our favorite venues in the same place unless they own the land. The venues that are iconic and last [will] need to control their rent.”

“Venues will either buy the land they sit on or they’ll move.”@Brendon_Anthony of @txmusicoffice

But venues may not be able to crack the code to sustainability on their own. Venues will have the most success if they band together to protect their businesses.

“There are real ways venues can work together to make their margins a bit easier to handle,” Anthony says. In Texas and other states, for instance, venues, bars, and restaurants are all taxed in the same way, even though venues have to put more of their money back into infrastructure. There could be a way for venues to reduce their tax rate, “but for that to happen, venues would have to define what being a venue means, and then go to work to lobby as a group for the change.”

Fighting for this recognition won’t be easy, but it’s the best way for rooms to protect their business. Venues in the UK have already seen success with this strategy, led by the Music Venue Trust and their annual Venues Day, aimed at raising awareness and advocating for venue rights. Venues in the states will need to follow suit, banding together to protect the future of live music in their respective cities.

4. Brands will become even more intertwined with artists

Sponsors spend $1.4 billion on the music industry in the United States each year, and that number is only going up. Instead of investing in large activations or stages at festivals, our experts predict that brands will focus more on building relationships with specific artists in the next year.

Mark Monahan, the festival director of Ottawa Bluesfest, has seen this shift firsthand. “In the last few years, most sponsors want to activate around artists,” Monahan says. “Five years ago in the festivals space, that was a nonstarter. Artists are recognizing the role sponsors play in helping to fund festivals, and are more willing to participate in auxiliary activities.”

Currently, most of these artist activations look like meet and greets, or small, private shows with festival headliners. But these activations will need to evolve and become more natural to succeed in 2017. It is likely we’ll see more activations like last year’s Lady Gaga’s Dive Bar Tour, sponsored by Bud Light. The series focused on one of the most important roles a brand can play for an artist: delighting fans by bringing them in more direct contact with their idols.

But this integrated relationship between artists and brands could be in conflict with another trend — that artists are more openly expressing their political beliefs.

“I’m hesitant about what the branded content space is going to look like in the next year,” Gaston says. “If artists get more politically involved, will that impact how brands interact with artists? It’s going to be really tricky if that spending shifts, especially since brand dollars have become more important to the bottom line for both artists and labels.”

5 Reasons Teaming Up With Another Band Means a Mutual Boost on Tour

[Editors Note: This blog was written by Jhoni Jackson, a music journalist and Puerto Rico-based venue owner.]

 

Heading out on tour with your band has the potential to bring everyone in it closer together. Co-existing and constantly collaborating, playing together night after night—becoming a tight-knit troupe in the process is almost inevitable. But why not double the bonds you could solidify by bringing another group into the picture? Organizing a joint tour means you’ll connect with even more fellow musicians—and that’s not the only benefit, either.

The notion that there’s strength in numbers is inarguably true for independent and DIY bands. Touring is one of the toughest parts of the gig; in that effort especially, you’ll accomplish more working together.

1. You’re sharing fans

Even if you hail from the same city, chances are you don’t share the exact same fanbase with any other band. That means pairing up in any capacity is an opportunity for exposure to new listeners; touring together is a maximized version of that.

Whenever possible, tag your tour-mates in related promo and other posts—and they should do the same, of course. Collaborate as much as you can: Both bands should be reflected in promo material like tour posters, promo videos announcing dates, Facebook events, and so forth. Every time you promote together is another chance to appeal to each other’s fans.

One result of two separate camps collectively pushing the promo could be increased show attendance, and there’s some strategy within that for increased effectiveness. If either group has toured before, include spots in your schedule that one has played and the other hasn’t; the band visiting for a second time can help carry the newcomer in terms of pull. Even if both bands are embarking on first-ever tours, though, you can also use Insights on your Facebook page to learn about the demographics of your fans. Their locations could help you choose which cities you visit, or what kind of marketing effort will work best based on your existing (or yet-to-be-built) audiences.

2. You can pool resources

Lug around less by sharing gear, particularly the bulkier items like amps and drums. Go in on groceries together to save money, and share the burden of cooking and preparing meals by rotating responsibilities. Depending on how big your group is, you might even travel together in a single vehicle, so there’s only one gas tank to fill to be split among all of you. And when you’re reaching out to friends and acquaintances as you line up places to crash on tour, more musicians in the mix means a greater potential number of generous hosts.

3. Two networks are better than one

Maybe one of you knows a booking agent in a particular city and the other doesn’t, or perhaps you’ve established a rapport with certain outlets that your touring mates haven’t. Knowing the right people in any given city can be a boon to a DIY tour. Whatever the effort, your connections combined are obviously doubly powerful.

4. Collaborating sparks creativity

Working together on any type of creative strategy, the sharing of influences and obscure discoveries, even casual conversations about art and music—something special happens when separate imaginations meet. New ideas pop up seemingly from nowhere; you gain fresh perspectives about other people’s work and your own.

Creativity fuels creativity, and in the close quarters of tour life, there’s no doubt you’ll find inspiration in collaborating—and practically living together—throughout the trip.

5. Through the camaraderie, you strengthen community bonds

Touring together is one of those shared experiences that facilitates deep connections and meaningful, lifelong friendships. The struggles, triumphs, exhaustion—incredible shows, bad turnouts, strategizing for press, the perpetual uphill battle of financial sustainment—are all collectively endured or celebrated.

Camaraderie develops naturally, and that, in turn, helps you strengthen your overall ties to your scene, whether that community is local or built around a genre and spread throughout different cities.

New Store Alert: Boomplay Music

Here at TuneCore, we’re always on the move to offer independent artists with as many outlets by which to reach fans as possible. That’s why we’re excited to announce our partnership with Boomplay Music, a streaming and download platform serving music fans in pan-Africa and African diaspora markets.

Boomplay Music – an app developed by TECNO MOBILE LIMITED – aims to deliver the best African and International music while also “building a sustainable digital music ecosystem for African artists.” With seven million users and a growth rate of over 700,000 new users per month, the platform seems to be doing just that!

As a global digital music distributor, TuneCore allows artists in all territories to take advantage of the major growth in streaming and discovery occurring all over the world and well outside their markets. Just because you aren’t touring in African countries (…yet), you can still make your releases available for music fans there to enjoy. By distributing your upcoming or existing singles, EPs, and albums to Boomplay Music, you’re able to enjoy a wider potential reach in an ever-expanding market.

With the Boomplay Music app, music lovers can do the following:

  • Download music,
  • Subscribe for unlimited music,
  • Listen to their favorite songs,
  • Watch videos on the go,
  • Curate personal playlists,
  • Follow, engage and interact with fellow users,

Ready to get started getting your music available on Boomplay Music?

If you’re a TuneCore Artist with active releases and you’d like to send those to this new platform, head over to your Store Manager and select Boomplay Music today.

If you’re distributing your music using TuneCore for the first time, you’ll now be able to select Boomplay Music as a digital outlet and expand the global reach of your new release.

Learn more about the benefits of distributing your music to Boomplay Music here. For any questions about distributing your upcoming releases, get in touch with our Artist Suppot team.

TuneCore Partners With Lyric Financial to Launch New Service That Empowers Independent Artists

First-Of-Its-Kind Integrated Financial Tool Gives Members Ability to Easily Request Advances on Future Earnings

New York, N.Y. – April 13, 2017 – TuneCore, the leading digital music distribution and publishing administration provider for independent musicians, today announced the launch of TuneCore Direct Advance. A unique collaboration with Lyric Financial, the leading financial services and technology company serving the global music industry, the innovative new service offers U.S.-based TuneCore artists automated advances on their future distribution sales revenue.

With many independent artists and labels operating as small to medium-sized businesses with sometimes minimal resources, TuneCore Direct Advance is a valuable new offering that allows them to take advances on future earnings to help fund new projects and further their careers. From recording new material to purchasing new equipment to funding a tour, TuneCore Direct Advance provides a simple way for artists to access advances at their convenience, 24/7 and on their own terms. In addition, this new advance model does not require artists to pledge ownership of their music, which is often the case with many competing services. With TuneCore Direct Advance, independent artists can have full control of their finances while still maintaining total creative control of their music.

“This is a one-of-a-kind integrated offering that gives artists a hassle-free, reliable way to access their future earnings quickly and easily, eliminating the difficulty often associated with obtaining advances,” says Scott Ackerman, CEO at TuneCore. “We are deeply invested in the careers of our artists and are committed to ensuring they have the tools and resources needed to succeed.”

TuneCore Direct Advance is the latest addition to the company’s comprehensive array of artist tools and services that are made to help them build successful music careers. The new service is available for U.S.-based TuneCore artists that meet certain eligibility requirements, including sales history and earning thresholds.

Qualifying customers can request a cash advance directly from their TuneCore Balance Page, and for a low, one-time fee, they will quickly and easily receive the money through PayPal or ACH (Automated Clearing House). The advance is repaid directly from future sales and automatically deducted from streaming and download earnings. Since this service operates as an independent process, artists avoid additional, time-consuming tasks often associated with obtaining advances, including registration and negotiations.

Based on direct feedback from customers, TuneCore recognized the need for a service that gives artists easy access to future sales income.

“As an artist for more than 20 years, I know firsthand the need for a money advance to cover anything from production to personal expenses,” says Lito MC Cassidy, TuneCore Artist. “For the first time in my career, I not only feel in full control of my money but also relieved to know that by simply choosing the amount of money I need, I can receive an advance in seconds.”

TuneCore Direct Advance was developed in partnership with Lyric Financial Founder and Chief Executive Eli Ball to give independent artists the ability to budget and access their royalties and licensing income at their convenience.

“For the last two years, we have worked to automate what has historically been a cumbersome manual advance process in the music industry,” says Ball.  “TuneCore Direct Advance is a simple, easy-to-use application that provides creatives with a clear view of their current and forecasted earnings, allowing them to request advances in less than a minute. These basic tools will be invaluable to any music industry professional in budgeting and managing the ups and downs of their cash flow. The deal we have announced today with TuneCore is a huge validation of the platform we have all worked so hard to create.”

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About TuneCore:

TuneCore brings more music to more people, while helping musicians and songwriters increase money-earning opportunities and take charge of their own careers. The company has one of the highest artist revenue-generating music catalogs in the world, earning TuneCore Artists $836 million from over 57.3 billion downloads and streams since inception. TuneCore Music Distribution services help artists, labels and managers sell their music through iTunes, Apple Music, Spotify, Amazon Music, Google Play and other major download and streaming sites while retaining 100 percent of their sales revenue and rights for a low annual flat fee. TuneCore Music Publishing Administration assists songwriters by administering their compositions through licensing, registration, world-wide royalty collections, and placement opportunities in film, TV, commercials, video games and more. The TuneCore Artist Services portal offers a suite of tools and services that enable artists to promote their craft, connect with fans, and get their music heard. TuneCore, part of Believe Digital Services, operates as an independent company and is headquartered in Brooklyn, NY with offices in Burbank, CA, Nashville, TN and Austin, TX, and global expansions in the UK, Australia, Japan, Canada, Germany, France and Italy. For additional information about TuneCore, please visit www.tunecore.com or https://youtu.be/1Kuu_tZ1In0

About Lyric Financial:

Founded in 2007, Lyric Financial is a financial services and technology company that provides innovative financing solutions to the global music and entertainment industry.  The company’s latest innovation, a virtual ATM platform called SNAP*, empowers creatives to tap into their catalog earnings in less than a minute. Based in Nashville, TN, for more information about Lyric Financial and their virtual ATM products please visit lyricfinancial.com.

For media inquiries, please contact:

TuneCore: Alisa Finkelstein, MWW PR

212-827-3753

afinkelstein@mww.com

 

Lyric Financial: John Vlautin, SpinLab

818-763-9800

jv@spinlab.net