April Industry Wrap-Up

Facebook Launches ‘Chat Extensions’ That Encourage Music Sharing

As both streaming music and social media use has evolved over the years, it became pretty obvious pretty quickly that people love to share whatever new music they’re digging with their networks. Spotify was an early player in this arena by connecting social profiles to their platform so that users can see in a feed what the folks they follow are listening to at any given time of day. On top of this feature, users have always been able to send music directly to one another via a built-in messaging app.

As the social media giant Facebook looks to appeal to more and more businesses that use the platform for leads and engagement with customers, they’ve announced the introduction of ‘Chat Extensions’ within their messenger platform. The primary function of this launch is to offer the ability to perform actions within Facebook Messenger without switching apps.

For Spotify, this means the launching a new ‘bot’ that includes search, recommendations, and the ability to share 30-second song clips as well as launch Spotify from the app to hear full songs. Friends now have more options for sharing and discovering music within their chat windows. Facebook has revealed that a similar launch to support Apple Music integration is on the way, too.

As Facebook continues to beef up its music department in general and looks to innovative streaming platforms for partnerships, indie artists of all genres can feel good about new ways for fans to be sharing their tunes with friends.

A Month of Updates From Spotify

It’s hard to get through one of our ‘Monthly Industry Wrap-Ups’ without breaking recent news related to streaming giant and our friendly partner Spotify! This month, Spotify re-structured its multi-year license agreement with global music rights agency Merlin – which represents independent music companies like Beggars Group, Secretly Group, Domino, Sub Pop, and others.

The big story from this signing is that the updated agreement allows these labels to ‘window’ releases for Spotify Premium users only – a tactic used by major label groups to limit access to a release for usually up to two weeks. The significance of windowing is that it allows releases to only be made available to users that contribute higher streaming rates, (when you’re a ‘freemium’ Spotify user, you are using an account that gets served ads and each time you play a song, it pays out less than that of Premium subscribers’ streams who pay a monthly fee).

Spotify and other streaming platforms are required to sign licensing agreements with both independent and major label groups. But what’s new here is the apparent bargaining scraps indie labels have when it comes to keeping up with the majors. As a distributor that sees its artists getting signed to indie labels on a regular basis, it’s encouraging to see that they’re able to take advantage of opportunities offered by streaming platforms like Spotify.

Additionally this month, Spotify rebranded their “Fan Insights” – data about who is listening to artists, from numbers of monthly listeners to cities they’re being streamed in most – as “Spotify For Artists”. It’s available to all artists and managers, and is designed to be a ‘one-stop shop’ that allows you to track growth, update creative profile assets, and feature particular songs and playlists. Here at TuneCore, we’re always excited to see more data and insights being offered to artists to help them make business and branding decisions. If you haven’t already, head over to Spotify’s site to take advantage of these updates.

Google Play Music Gets Cozy With Newest Samsung Galaxy Model

As competition for subscribers and listeners continues to heat up among music streaming platforms, so too does competition among mobile device manufacturers. Nowhere is that more obvious than between Apple’s iPhone and Samsung’s Galaxy. As each company strives to attract brand loyalty to their respective operating systems, Samsung announced that its latest model, the Galaxy S8, has made Google Play Music its preferred music player.

That means those who pick up the newest Galaxy S8 will get the opportunity to use Google Play Music with enhancements just for them. One of these is an increase in cloud locker storage, with Samsung users being able to upload up to 100,000 tracks that can be streamed from anywhere (up from 50,000 for other users). Also, Samsung promises that it’s choice music player will support Samsung’s smartphone assistant, Bixby, “once support for voice commands is actually ready to roll out.”

It remains to be seen how many Galaxy S8 users will adopt Google Play Music over a preferred service, but it’s no doubt that Samsung will do what they can in collaboration to make it more attractive. For independent artists, it’s just another push for a platform that is carrying your releases already (unless, of course, you still need to add your music to Google Play!), and it may in turn end up being a great excuse for you to be promoting your Google Play links, as well.

4 Major Live Music Trends Changing The Industry This Year

[Editors Note: This blog was written by Rachel Grate and originally appeared on the Eventbrite Blog.]

 

We’re just one month into 2017 (ed. – this was originally published in February of 2017), and it’s already proven to be a year of big changes — and the live music industry is no exception to the rule.

To stay on top of your game in a shifting landscape, you need a firm grip on the music trends that will shift the landscape in 2017. But don’t take it from us — take it from the nineteen industry pros we interviewed, including Newport Folk Festival, Afropunk, National Sawdust, and more.

Here’s how tastemakers predict the live music industry will change in 2017 — and how you can use those trends to protect your business.

1. Activism will revive the live music community

“Music has recently been more about escapism than activism,” says Jay Sweet, festival director and talent buyer for the Newport Festivals Foundation. But with major political changes coming in 2017, fans may be looking to their favorite artists to take a stance. “I’m excited because I think this could be the year where musicians could… try to affect positive change through music,” Sweet says.

Matthew Morgan, the co-founder of Afropunk, believes fans will look to live music as an opportunity to make sense of the world around them. “We’re in line for some really great art over the next four years, [and] what we’re doing is going to be even more important,” Morgan says. “So many people are looking for things that are positive, that give them something meaningful in their lives.”

“We’re in line for some really great art over the next 4 years.” — Matthew Morgan of @afropunk

In this quest for self-expression, fans and artists will use live performances as an opportunity to build community around shared causes. “Festivals are a place for people to congregate safely — a place to share a common, collective experience,” Sweet says. It will be up to independent promoters and producers to create these safe spaces for activism.

2. Immersive theater will influence live music performances

From popular events like The Speakeasy in San Francisco to the topic of breakout HBO show Westworld, immersive theater made a big splash in 2016. These shows make audience members a part of the performance, and this year, we’ll see their influence begin to make live music performances more multidimensional.

“The world of immersive theater is about to explode,” says Nick Panama, the founder of Cantora. “We’ll be seeing a lot more experiential storytelling, and its influence on live music.”

Panama predicts live shows will expand the storytelling from the music itself to other senses. Instead of relying solely on audio cues or a screen behind them to tell a story, performers will begin to activate the entire room or stadium with immersive sensory details. Using a variety of new technologies, fans will become part of an alternate reality for the duration of the show.

3. Venues will band together to establish more sustainable economics

With rising rent prices in cities across the country, venues are facing a serious financial challenge in 2017.

“Venues will either buy the land they sit on, or they’ll move,” says Brendon Anthony, the director of the Texas Music Office. “We’re not going to see our favorite venues in the same place unless they own the land. The venues that are iconic and last [will] need to control their rent.”

“Venues will either buy the land they sit on or they’ll move.”@Brendon_Anthony of @txmusicoffice

But venues may not be able to crack the code to sustainability on their own. Venues will have the most success if they band together to protect their businesses.

“There are real ways venues can work together to make their margins a bit easier to handle,” Anthony says. In Texas and other states, for instance, venues, bars, and restaurants are all taxed in the same way, even though venues have to put more of their money back into infrastructure. There could be a way for venues to reduce their tax rate, “but for that to happen, venues would have to define what being a venue means, and then go to work to lobby as a group for the change.”

Fighting for this recognition won’t be easy, but it’s the best way for rooms to protect their business. Venues in the UK have already seen success with this strategy, led by the Music Venue Trust and their annual Venues Day, aimed at raising awareness and advocating for venue rights. Venues in the states will need to follow suit, banding together to protect the future of live music in their respective cities.

4. Brands will become even more intertwined with artists

Sponsors spend $1.4 billion on the music industry in the United States each year, and that number is only going up. Instead of investing in large activations or stages at festivals, our experts predict that brands will focus more on building relationships with specific artists in the next year.

Mark Monahan, the festival director of Ottawa Bluesfest, has seen this shift firsthand. “In the last few years, most sponsors want to activate around artists,” Monahan says. “Five years ago in the festivals space, that was a nonstarter. Artists are recognizing the role sponsors play in helping to fund festivals, and are more willing to participate in auxiliary activities.”

Currently, most of these artist activations look like meet and greets, or small, private shows with festival headliners. But these activations will need to evolve and become more natural to succeed in 2017. It is likely we’ll see more activations like last year’s Lady Gaga’s Dive Bar Tour, sponsored by Bud Light. The series focused on one of the most important roles a brand can play for an artist: delighting fans by bringing them in more direct contact with their idols.

But this integrated relationship between artists and brands could be in conflict with another trend — that artists are more openly expressing their political beliefs.

“I’m hesitant about what the branded content space is going to look like in the next year,” Gaston says. “If artists get more politically involved, will that impact how brands interact with artists? It’s going to be really tricky if that spending shifts, especially since brand dollars have become more important to the bottom line for both artists and labels.”

March Industry Wrap-Up

Pandora Premium Takes on the On-Demand Streaming Game


While household names like Spotify and Apple Music boast a combined 120+ million users streaming music each month, Pandora has enjoyed the success of their proprietary “Music Genome Project” algorithm and their ability to draw users in with perfectly curated and personalized radio stations. Last year, Pandora announced it’s “Pandora Plus” service, offering listeners more replays and skips, as well as the ability to listen to offline radio stations. Now, after much anticipation, the biggest name in digital radio has announced “Pandora Premium”, their brand new on-demand streaming service.

Pandora Premium will function much like other monthly subscription streaming services, offering a similar catalog of over 30 million tracks for listeners to browse and discover. With its current user-base of 80 million, Pandora sees its transition into on-demand streaming as an opportunity for further growth. While it remains to be seen, there may be an advantage to joining the game late – for instance, Pandora won’t be focusing on ‘exclusives’ for big name releases, and instead hopes to utilize its personalization proficiencies to stand out in the crowd of streaming services when it comes to recommending songs to users based on their listening habits as a means of music discovery.

“We have very grand ambitions for what this can be,” Pandora CEO Tim Westergren said. “If we look around at the space right now, we just don’t think that there’s a product that’s done it right. No one has solved the ease of use and personalization part of the on-demand world. I don’t think there’s really a true premium product out there yet… we think we’re bringing something really different here.”

This development is great news for indie artists who hope to tap into Pandora’s user-base by making their releases available on-demand.

Ticketmaster Uses Software to Combat Bots More Effectively


Whether you’re a fan who paid out the nose for a ticket or lost out to what would have to be the fastest ticket-buying hands known to man, or you’re an artist who has had to deal with the backlash of bots buying up all their tickets, there’s a general consensus in the live music industry that these bots aren’t really doing consumers or artists any good. In fact, you could say most people feel that bots – which derive from software that immediately purchases tickets when they go on sale in bulk, only to re-sell at a higher cost to fans – are completely ripping people off!

Enter Ticketmaster’s “Verified Fan” program. Ticket scalping (re-selling tickets at higher costs), as it’s known, has become such a problem on the company’s platform that they’ve introduced new efforts to combat it by using customer data and new systems. For example, identifying fans’ purchasing history has been tested with lower-level tours to cut down on automated ticket buying systems and bot purchases. The program requires fans to register to buy tickets in advance (typically 48 hours before they go on sale); shortly after, Ticketmaster collects emails and scrubs out any believed to be connected to scalpers. Verified Fan is being used for pre-sales at the moment, but could be expanded for general sales in the future.

This is a meaningful attempt to make sure that artists – both major label and independent alike – are able to continue to offer tickets to their tour dates through this platform without worrying that their fans are getting ripped off.

Early Reports Suggest a Potential $16.1 Billion Year For Recorded Music During 2016


Each year, the IFPI (International Federation of the Phonographic Industry) announces official music industry figures to show how much was earned over four quarters. In March, Midia Research offered its own 2016 estimates ahead of the annual IFPI announcement – suggesting a 7% ($1.1. billion) year-over-year increase in the realm of recorded music at $16.1 billion.

Since the music industry entered into a major paradigm shift in the early days of Napster, and as illegal downloading took off across other platforms, this is considered a major uptick in annual growth. As Midia puts it, “Underpinning the growth was streaming which grew by 57% in 2016 to reach $5.4 billion, up $3.5 billion in 2015.”

While streaming music platforms were initially introduced as not only a way for fans to have legally licensed music at their fingertips but also to curb the trend in music piracy, there’s little doubt that artists and industry professionals alike have reaped the benefits of its popularity in the past couple of years. The report credits Spotify’s role in the growth, “accounting for 43% of the 106.3 million subscribers at the end of 2016.” But don’t sleep on Apple Music, Amazon Music and Deezer, who have been considered “strong contributors” to streaming growth last year.

Breaking revenue down by record label, we see that Universal, Sony and Warner Music made up a combined $11 billion in revenue, with independent labels generating $5.1 billion, or 31.3% of the global market share! As 2017 looks to offer increased figures, independent artists can rest assured that overall, recorded music can still be a viable revenue stream as more fans subscribe, listen, and discover.

January Industry Wrap-Up

The first month of 2017 is in the books, and even with a post-holiday haze in the air, the music industry didn’t slow down. Catch up with some of the headlines from January and head into the next month informed!

Music Streaming Subscriptions Surpass Netflix


Is ‘binge-listening’ going to be a thing now? Not quite, but as Music Business Worldwide reports, at the end of 2016, a little over 100 million people were paying subscription fees for music platforms like Spotify, Deezer, and Apple Music. That’s an uptick from 68 million people who were reported subscribers at the end of 2015. The television/movie streaming giant Netflix, on the other hand, reportedly rounded last year off with 87.8 million subscribed.

MIDiA reported that according to its data, around 43 million of these subscribers preferred Spotify, 20.9 million chose Apple Music, 6.9 million subscribe to Deezer, with Napster and TIDAL faring at 4.5 million and 1 million, respectively.

NetflixShould we be surprised at the numbers? There’s no doubt that we’ve seen music fans – both active and passive – warm up to streaming in general, and more artists have felt comfortable making their releases available across platforms. While it’s taken years to get here, there’s no denying the important evolution of streaming and what it has meant for artists’ (independent otherwise) ability to earn more revenue from their music. As MIDiA’s Mark Mulligan put it, “100 million subscribers might not mean the world changes in an instant, but it does reflect a changing world.” It’s safe to say that artists have the opportunity to reach more fans – new and old – than ever before by taking advantage of the many streaming platforms out there.   

Pandora, YouTube and Spotify Beat Radio For First Time


First Netflix, now radio? According to a new MusicWatch survey, it wasn’t just the household-name movie and TV service that music streaming platforms stole the shine from in 2016. Bringing to the table free and ad-supported providers like YouTube and Pandora, AM/FM Radio came in second to streaming music services for music listening. 28% of survey-takers said they prefered to stream while 24% opted for the more traditional route of terrestrial radio. Pandora (who TuneCore recently announced a partnership with) topped the chart of participants’ preferred streaming services with 28%, followed by YouTube shortly behind at 27%, and Spotify ranking third with 17% of the share.

weekly share
Courtesy of MusicWatch Inc.

While it could be that as radio stations become more and more conglomerated, music listeners feel that they have less and less say in what they’re hearing on AM/FM radio, it likely also boils down to the sheer amount of access that streaming music services provide. Curation and overall availability of music is key in streaming’s appeal to feverish music fans, the advent of smart mobile devices simply makes it easier even for those casual fans who don’t mind an ad or two between their daily or weekly intake of Top 40 hits.

YouTube Launches Super Chat Tool To Help Channel Owners Earn More


As Facebook wraps up its $50 million effort to spread the word about its Facebook Live feature via celebrities and other publishers, the live streaming war continues to heat up. This month, YouTube announced the launch of a product known as “Super Chat” that will give channel owners the opportunity to further monetize their live streams. Discontinuing the “Fan Funding Feature”, Super Chat will act as a sort of tip jar for YouTubers to better connect with the live streamer. For musicians, using a live stream to show off a new single, update a tour diary, make a special announcement, or host a Q&A session with fans can also mean earning extra revenue.


As fans pay, their comments (or ‘Super Chats’) will remain pinned to the top of the chat for up to five hours – this ensures that the channel owner sees their messages in a more pronounced manner, and allows the commenter to get their question/comment across with greater exposure. This opens up an opportunity for indie musicians to not only explore new ways of promoting themselves and making a little extra dough, but also discover what kinds of engagement their fans respond to. According to
HypeBot, Super Chat is expected to be available for creators in 20 countries and viewers in 40 by January 31st.

Whether it’s music, gaming, or other entertainment, creators and artists/musicians of all sorts flock to the platform to connect with new and established fan bases. TuneCore has already helped countless independent artists collect their sound recording revenue from ads placed on videos using their music since 2014, and the new Super Chat feature adds an interesting method for connecting with fans in a more direct manner. It certainly helps that fans will be able to feel good about contributing money and being heard.

Rights Society SESAC Purchased by Blackstone Group, LP


SESAC, a performance rights organization (PRO) based in the United States alongside ASCAP and BMI, was offered a rumored $1 billion acquisition deal from the private equity firm Blackstone Group, LP.

Unlike ASCAP and BMI, which only collect and pay out public performance royalties for songwriters, SESAC covers public performance, mechanical, and sync in-house. These offerings were amplified by the purchase of mechanical rights powerhouse the Harry Fox Agency in 2015.

The first step into the music industry for Blackstone Group, the collection society is expected to retain their existing management team while receiving support from the equity firm, with SESAC’s CEO John Josephson remarking, “We anticipate a seamless transition in ownership with no disruption to our business activities as a result of this transaction.”

Screen Shot 2017-01-31 at 11.10.02 AMWhat this means for the near future of public performance collection societies is tough to comment on, but it certainly shows that SESAC, the youngest of all three, is poised for further growth. What it means for U.S.-based independent artists is that they should try to remain as informed as possible about the continued growth and new offerings from PRO’s that may help them advance their career.  Head over to Billboard to see the breakdown of SESAC’s financials as we wait to hear confirmation on a deal.

December Industry Wrap-Up

By Hugh McIntyre

2016 has finally come to a close (or it will relatively soon, thankfully), but we’re not done just yet. December is always the busiest month for everybody, and the same is doubly true for the music industry. The biggest albums are released, year-end lists begin rolling out, the Grammy nominations are announced, and everybody starts gearing up for a new year. This December was no different, and there was quite a lot going on.

  • Drake was the most popular artist on pretty much every streaming platform there is, and it wasn’t even close;
  • Artists being played on the radio might soon see their royalty checks dwindle;
  • A classical composer who has been dead for a century nabbed the title of the best-selling CD of 2016; and
  • We all love Facebook…except the music industry and indie musicians, that is.

Drake ran all of streaming by an enormous margin in 2016


It should come as no surprise that Drake was the most-streamed artist of 2016, with almost no differentiation between the major players in streaming.

The hip-hop star was the most-played on Spotify and Apple Music, and the most-thumbed on Pandora (meaning more people liked his songs than any others). His album Views and his songs “One Dance” and his collaborative hit with Rihanna, “Work,” helped his name appear at the top of essentially every ranking.

Drake himself saw his music played close to five billion times on Spotify alone, and Views just recently became the first album on Apple Music to see its songs streamed at least one billion times. Spotify, which has five times the users as Apple’s relatively new entrant to the streaming market (100 million vs. 20 million), padded the rapper’s wallet even more. Just about a week or so ago, “One Dance” became the first to reach the one billion milestone on Spotify, becoming the first of what will surely be many.

The only places on the web where Drake didn’t seem to rule were on video platforms. He was not among the most popular acts on sites like YouTube and Vevo, which was because his album Views and the singles released off of it didn’t have promotional strategies based on videos for the most part.

While not everybody can rack up as many plays as Drake and his friends, the number of songs being streamed in the U.S. every year is growing rapidly, and that benefits everyone. Nielsen reports that by the time the year has concluded, over 250 billion (yes, that’s billion with a b) tracks will have been streamed in America, which represents a 77% increase from 2015. With more and more people signing up every day, that number should continue to climb by at least another 50% in 2017.

Radio stations are looking to pay songwriters even less


The radio industry is notorious for low payout rates, and ones that only benefit some artists, and it still isn’t satisfied with that fact.

A committee combining the powerful forces of 10,000 radio stations across the United States has launched a lawsuit against Global Rights Music (GMR), a performance rights organization that is tasked with collecting royalties from people and companies that play the music of its artists, and with working to slowly, but steadily, raise the amount paid for those broadcasts.

This action, while despicable to artists of all kinds and at all points in their careers, is nothing new. For decades now, the radio industry has fought to lower the amount of money it needs to pay when songs are broadcast to listeners. Every so often, there seems to be some new all-important reason why the business of radio deserves to put more money in its own pockets, or why artists are being overpaid.

While the industry’s reasons change from effort to effort (and this time it’s something a bit too technical to actually be relevant or important to most people, and it seems like a real grab), the fact that radio needs music much more than the opposite remains irreversibly true. If every major artist pulled their catalog for use on commercial radio, people would find other ways to listen to tunes, while the business would go under. Radio argues that it provides valuable promotion to artists and record labels, which makes them money, but does that mean the entire industry should continuously be allowed to pay less and less for the same performances?

The radio industry doesn’t often win in these cases, or at least not by too much, so hopefully this latest legal assault won’t pan out, and artists will still be paid the fractions they earn now.

The best-selling CD of 2016 is shocking, while the best-selling albums are not


It might sound too crazy to be true, but the artist that managed to sell the most CDs from one collection is none other than Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. The composer, who certainly wasn’t around to do any promotion or tour on the new item sold under his name, released a new box set in 2016, and his super fans snapped it up.

Mozart 225, a celebration of essentially everything he ever wrote for his 225th birthday, is a 200-CD box set that retailed for under $350 on Amazon, making it a serious steal. The label behind this project, Decca, wasted no time in sharing the news that it had nabbed the best-selling CD of the year, which is technically true…at least in some respects. The box set only moved about 7,000 copies, but when one considers that there are 200 CDs per box, that adds up to about 1.3 million shifted, which is rather impressive in 2016.

Having said that, Mozart 225 is only available on CD, so it lost out to more current stars when other forms of albums are added into the mix. Drake, Beyoncé, Adele, and Rihanna all moved more albums (or album projects when streaming is taken into account), and people bought their CDs too!

CDs as a category took another hit in 2016, but millions of people around the world still want to own the music they love in physical form, and they are willing to pay. Those artists working in genres that cater to audiences that like to buy music, especially in physical mediums such as classical, should not be swayed from making these products for fans to buy.

Facebook is clashing with the music industry in major ways


Social media giant Facebook has long been a leader when it comes to many technological advancements, from connecting with friends and family around the world to messaging to online gaming, but when music is concerned, the world’s most popular social channel is playing catch up, and things do not appear to be going well.

The company started integrating music and music videos in a major way not too long ago, and while that sounds like it should be a good thing for everybody involved, the music industry has banded together for the most part, and it is not thrilled.

Licensing deals have not been signed with the major labels, and advertising does not exist in the same way as on sites like YouTube or Vevo, so the money isn’t flowing as it should. This means that artists of many sizes, especially those towards the bottom in terms of popularity and those trading in covers, aren’t earning money on their works, even though Facebook can collect cash on ads placed not necessarily on the videos themselves, but on other pages on the website.

Because Facebook isn’t yet paying for using music (which already seems like a ridiculous sentence), takedown notices are pouring in as they used to on YouTube before advertising models caught up with the way people were uploading tunes. This is bad for anybody trying to promote their music, or themselves, on the platform, and it’s sadly not going to change until the industry can force Facebook to start paying for the music it is using. The social channel could, and hopefully will be, a powerful tool for promotion and a source of revenue, but that may need to wait until next year.

TuneCore Closes Out Strong Year of International Growth With Launch of TuneCore Italy

Streaming Is On The Rise Across All International Markets

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK – December 13, 2016 – TuneCore, the leading digital music distribution and publishing administration service provider, caps off a strong year of sustained and international growth with the announcement today of TuneCore Italy – the service provider’s fourth launch in the European market and sixth international expansion. Since the company’s inception in 2006, TuneCore artists worldwide have earned more than $783 million collectively from over 43.8 billion downloads and streams. As the only major global distribution service with a dedicated Italian offering, Tunecore.it features local content in the native language that caters to the Italian independent artist community.

As part of its continued commitment to support independent artists around the world, in 2016 TuneCore launched three international sites including TuneCore Germany (April 2016), TuneCore France (October 2016) and now, TuneCore Italy (December 2016).

TuneCore’s global expansion efforts have led to an overall increase in its year-to-date international customer base. Further, TuneCore’s local offerings in international markets have seen significant increases in customer growth, specifically in the France and Germany markets. TuneCore also identified Hip Hop and R&B/Soul as two of the fastest growing genres in each of its key international markets (U.S., Canada, UK, Australia, Germany and France). Additionally, TuneCore has seen the growing popularity of streaming reflected across its international markets, with a 340 percent year-over-year increase in streaming in Canada, as well as year-over-year increases in Australia (92 percent), Germany (71 percent) and the UK (67 percent). Streaming also continues to grow in the U.S., with a 65 percent year-over-year increase.

“As we head into 2017, global expansion is pivotal in furthering our mission to bring more music to more people worldwide, while continuing to establish TuneCore as a leader in the international digital music distribution market,” says Scott Ackerman, CEO at TuneCore. “Our global expansion into Italy – a market that previously lacked a dedicated local offering from a global distributor – is a natural fit as we continue to support our artists by giving them the local resources and tools they need to be successful.”

In addition to keeping 100 percent of their revenues, and retaining complete creative control and ownership of their music, Italian customers will have access to TuneCore’s robust portfolio of artist services, as well as local Italian partners such as Music Raiser and MusicOFF, and world-class customer service. TuneCore Italy artists can also opt to include their music in storefronts controlled by TuneCore’s extensive network of more than 150 digital partners across the globe, including iTunes, Spotify, Apple Music, Google Play and Amazon Music. In addition, TuneCore Italy customers will be able to take advantage of the company’s strategic partnership with Believe Digital. With an already existing office in Italy with more than 30 employees, Believe Digital will offer TuneCore Italy customers access to a variety of advanced artist services, such as international campaign management, trade and online digital marketing, video management and distribution, physical distribution and more.

With its expansion into Italy, TuneCore now offers local musicians in seven countries outside of the U.S. – UK, Australia, Canada, Japan, Germany, France, and Italy – the opportunity to collect revenue from streaming services, digital download stores, songwriter royalties, and sync licensing opportunities, all in their local currency.

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About TuneCore

TuneCore brings more music to more people, while helping musicians and songwriters increase money-earning opportunities and take charge of their own careers. The company has one of the highest artist revenue-generating music catalogs in the world, earning TuneCore Artists $783 million from over 43.8 billion downloads and streams since inception. TuneCore Music Distribution services help artists, labels and managers sell their music through iTunes, Apple Music, Spotify, Amazon Music, Google Play and other major download and streaming sites while retaining 100 percent of their sales revenue and rights for a low annual flat fee.

TuneCore Music Publishing Administration assists songwriters by administering their compositions through licensing, registration, world-wide royalty collections, and placement opportunities in film, TV, commercials, video games and more. The TuneCore Artist Services portal offers a suite of tools and services that enable artists to promote their craft, connect with fans, and get their music heard. TuneCore, part of Believe Digital Services, operates as an independent company and is headquartered in Brooklyn, NY with offices in Burbank, CA, Nashville, TN and Austin, TX, and global expansions in the UK, Australia, Japan, Canada, Germany and France. For additional information about TuneCore, please visit www.tunecore.com or https://youtu.be/TSjGACrJyiY.