Industry Navigation Tools for Songwriters

[Editors Note: This is a guest blog written by TuneCore Artist Skela. Enjoy her tips to better network, collaborate, and engage was an independent songwriter in the music industry!]

You have to work very, very hard for a just a little bit of luck in the music industry. There are so many beautifully talented artists in this world, and it’s so easy to become overwhelmed by the idea of being one small fish in what feels like many oceans. Instead of being intimidated or striking up ugly green competition with your counterparts, use the multitude of likeminded artists around you to your advantage.

Songwriters are special creatures. We are spectators, empathetic beings, and constantly translating emotion onto paper. You may not know it yet, but one of your greatest strengths can be the ability to connect with others.

So do it.

Interact with the musicians around you. You may have written your best song alone in your bedroom, but it’s about more than that. Creating a long lasting career takes a village – or, people who support one another. Here are a few navigation tips I wish I knew in the beginning of my career:

1. There is no way of knowing who is going to be plucked from the bucket next.

Don’t cling to the cool kids. Don’t pursue people that you think are going to be the next big thing. Find the artists whose work you admire and connect with them. If you vibe with someone’s music, there’s a good chance you’re going to work well with them. Find your people, not your posse.

2. Go to your friends’ performances.

This seems obvious, but you would be surprised how many people don’t show up and support their music making peers. It’s important to show face because there is going to come a time where you need heads in a room and the favor returned. Also, buying tickets to concerts is what makes the industry go round. Most importantly, seeing someone in their element live is inspiring and always an opportunity to learn something new!

3. Never, ever stop writing.

If you’re going to be “something” in this world, then be the best damn “something” there is. If you’re going to call yourself a songwriter, then make sure you have an arsenal of material ready to work at any given time. You never know what session you might be asked to hop in on. Make sure you have it together so you don’t miss any opportunities to work with people.

4. Don’t burn bridges.

Again, you never know who is going to make it next in this industry. There is no foreseeable timeline attached to musicians so don’t write them off just because they’re not growing parallel to you. There’s a way to speak to people and a way to end relationships amicably. Lead a relationship by good example and leave the future open not barbed with past fallouts.

5. Speak up!

Just because you’re not a producer doesn’t mean that you should sit next to a producer in the studio silent. No one knows the sound you’re after better than you do. You might not know the technical aspect of how to create the palette and structure of a song, but you should know what it takes and be able to find the appropriate references and language in order to properly articulate your vision.

I know that working with producers can be intimidating. When I first started working with producers, I was just so grateful to be working with anyone at all that I nodded my head in agreement to almost everything. If you know what you want, don’t be afraid to speak up. The sooner the better, trust me.

6. When you know, you know.

Don’t force relationships. They should come naturally. It’s impossible to have a strong connection with every musician you meet. Take the session, try it out, and if it doesn’t work, both parties are going to feel something is off. Maximize your time by listening to your instincts when it comes to producers, songwriters and instrumentalists.

7. There is no such thing as an overnight success.

It is so easy to be jealous of others who are finding success in the music industry, but know that the people who are excelling probably worked extremely hard for their bite. It doesn’t come easy or without struggle. If one of your friends is finding success, it means that you’re surrounded by the right people. It’s a good thing when another musician starts to make traction. Your time will come because there is no expiration date if you don’t give up.

New Music Friday: April 21, 2017

TuneCore Artists are releasing tons of new music every day. Each week we check out the new TuneCore releases and choose a few at random to feature on the blog.

Is your hit next?

Follow Music Made Me – a Spotify playlist that’s updated every Friday with new releases from TuneCore Artists – stream it below!


Changing
Devan Dubois
Alternative, Pop


Older Men & Whiskey
Chyyanna Lee
Pop, Country


Monument
Lions Lions

Rock, Alternative


Goals
Nate Good

Hip Hop/Rap


Treat You Better
Throw the Fight

Rock, Alternative


In Dank We Trust

Black the Ripper
Hip Hop/Rap, New Age


Battles
Rita Springer
Christian/Gospel


86
Infected Rain

Rock


Passionfruit
Cimorelli

Pop


Addiction Kills
Jelly Roll

Hip Hop/Rap


Change: The Lost Record
Josh Thompson

Country


Black Hole Sun
Break of Reality

Rock, Instrumental

Wednesday Video Diversion: April 19, 2017

Did you know that rock and roll behemoths QUEEN were once called SMILE? Well, they were. And in on this day back in 1969 they made their debut in England as a band at the Revolution Club. Only four years before, the Beatles dropped their single “Ticket To Ride”! What do these two things have in common? Nothing. They’re just two cool British rock and roll facts from the same day in history! As always we’re here mid-week to distract you with weird trivia and an awesome line-up of TuneCore Artist music videos – so now that we’ve covered one-half of that, enjoy the other half below:

 

Rathborne, “Last Forgiven”

BLAKE, “Flexin”

CARFACE, “Playing Pretend”

VHS Collection, “Wide Awake”

Cimorelli, “Passionfruit (Drake Cover)”

Julie Hanse, “It’s Not”

Toni Romiti, “Imma Dog Too”

Black the Ripper, “Light Up Everywhere (Uber Everywhere Remix)”

Jessica Frech, “Where I Come From”


Sono Oto, “A Way to Stay Away”

5 Reasons Teaming Up With Another Band Means a Mutual Boost on Tour

[Editors Note: This blog was written by Jhoni Jackson, a music journalist and Puerto Rico-based venue owner.]

 

Heading out on tour with your band has the potential to bring everyone in it closer together. Co-existing and constantly collaborating, playing together night after night—becoming a tight-knit troupe in the process is almost inevitable. But why not double the bonds you could solidify by bringing another group into the picture? Organizing a joint tour means you’ll connect with even more fellow musicians—and that’s not the only benefit, either.

The notion that there’s strength in numbers is inarguably true for independent and DIY bands. Touring is one of the toughest parts of the gig; in that effort especially, you’ll accomplish more working together.

1. You’re sharing fans

Even if you hail from the same city, chances are you don’t share the exact same fanbase with any other band. That means pairing up in any capacity is an opportunity for exposure to new listeners; touring together is a maximized version of that.

Whenever possible, tag your tour-mates in related promo and other posts—and they should do the same, of course. Collaborate as much as you can: Both bands should be reflected in promo material like tour posters, promo videos announcing dates, Facebook events, and so forth. Every time you promote together is another chance to appeal to each other’s fans.

One result of two separate camps collectively pushing the promo could be increased show attendance, and there’s some strategy within that for increased effectiveness. If either group has toured before, include spots in your schedule that one has played and the other hasn’t; the band visiting for a second time can help carry the newcomer in terms of pull. Even if both bands are embarking on first-ever tours, though, you can also use Insights on your Facebook page to learn about the demographics of your fans. Their locations could help you choose which cities you visit, or what kind of marketing effort will work best based on your existing (or yet-to-be-built) audiences.

2. You can pool resources

Lug around less by sharing gear, particularly the bulkier items like amps and drums. Go in on groceries together to save money, and share the burden of cooking and preparing meals by rotating responsibilities. Depending on how big your group is, you might even travel together in a single vehicle, so there’s only one gas tank to fill to be split among all of you. And when you’re reaching out to friends and acquaintances as you line up places to crash on tour, more musicians in the mix means a greater potential number of generous hosts.

3. Two networks are better than one

Maybe one of you knows a booking agent in a particular city and the other doesn’t, or perhaps you’ve established a rapport with certain outlets that your touring mates haven’t. Knowing the right people in any given city can be a boon to a DIY tour. Whatever the effort, your connections combined are obviously doubly powerful.

4. Collaborating sparks creativity

Working together on any type of creative strategy, the sharing of influences and obscure discoveries, even casual conversations about art and music—something special happens when separate imaginations meet. New ideas pop up seemingly from nowhere; you gain fresh perspectives about other people’s work and your own.

Creativity fuels creativity, and in the close quarters of tour life, there’s no doubt you’ll find inspiration in collaborating—and practically living together—throughout the trip.

5. Through the camaraderie, you strengthen community bonds

Touring together is one of those shared experiences that facilitates deep connections and meaningful, lifelong friendships. The struggles, triumphs, exhaustion—incredible shows, bad turnouts, strategizing for press, the perpetual uphill battle of financial sustainment—are all collectively endured or celebrated.

Camaraderie develops naturally, and that, in turn, helps you strengthen your overall ties to your scene, whether that community is local or built around a genre and spread throughout different cities.

New Music Friday: April 14, 2017

TuneCore Artists are releasing tons of new music every day. Each week we check out the new TuneCore releases and choose a few at random to feature on the blog.

Is your hit next?

Follow Music Made Me – a Spotify playlist that’s updated every Friday with new releases from TuneCore Artists – stream it below!


Breathe
Moosh & Twist

Hip Hop/Rap


Made 2 Love U
Johnny Balik

Pop


Freesol (feat. Skyler Stronestreet)
Seven Lions

Electronic, Dance


Bloom
RKCB

R&B/Soul, Electronic


The Outfield
The Night Game

Alternative, Rock


Hinterland
Akurei

Electronic, Alternative


Sail Away
The Dead Sailor Girls

Singer/Songwriter, Folk


Broke Royalty
Flint Eastwood

Alternative


Still Love
Ghost Against Ghost

Alternative, Electronic


I Got You
Superwalkers

Pop, Electronic


Miss Taken (Demos)
RoadTrip

Pop, Rock


The Soulvation Society
The Soulvation Society

R&B/Soul, Pop


Amame o Matame (feat. Don Omar)
Ivy Queen

Latin


Bound 2017
Baco & Termy

Electronic, Hip Hop/Rap


Ain’t Your Girl
BEATZ

Pop, R&B/Soul


So Much to Keep
AirLands

Alternative, Rock


Heart Songs: Adoration

Naomi Raine
Christian/Gospel, Singer/Songwriter


Ladies And Gentlemen: Barenaked Ladies and the Persuasions
Barenaked Ladies and the Persuasions 

Pop, Vocal


Walking In My Favor
Lucinda Moore

Christian/Gospel

New Store Alert: Boomplay Music

Here at TuneCore, we’re always on the move to offer independent artists with as many outlets by which to reach fans as possible. That’s why we’re excited to announce our partnership with Boomplay Music, a streaming and download platform serving music fans in pan-Africa and African diaspora markets.

Boomplay Music – an app developed by TECNO MOBILE LIMITED – aims to deliver the best African and International music while also “building a sustainable digital music ecosystem for African artists.” With seven million users and a growth rate of over 700,000 new users per month, the platform seems to be doing just that!

As a global digital music distributor, TuneCore allows artists in all territories to take advantage of the major growth in streaming and discovery occurring all over the world and well outside their markets. Just because you aren’t touring in African countries (…yet), you can still make your releases available for music fans there to enjoy. By distributing your upcoming or existing singles, EPs, and albums to Boomplay Music, you’re able to enjoy a wider potential reach in an ever-expanding market.

With the Boomplay Music app, music lovers can do the following:

  • Download music,
  • Subscribe for unlimited music,
  • Listen to their favorite songs,
  • Watch videos on the go,
  • Curate personal playlists,
  • Follow, engage and interact with fellow users,

Ready to get started getting your music available on Boomplay Music?

If you’re a TuneCore Artist with active releases and you’d like to send those to this new platform, head over to your Store Manager and select Boomplay Music today.

If you’re distributing your music using TuneCore for the first time, you’ll now be able to select Boomplay Music as a digital outlet and expand the global reach of your new release.

Learn more about the benefits of distributing your music to Boomplay Music here. For any questions about distributing your upcoming releases, get in touch with our Artist Suppot team.