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Simply Flute Cover
  • Simply Flute
  • Jazz
  • Sam Most
  • 05/05/2008
  • Simply Flute
Liner Notes: 1) Devil May Care (Bob Dorough/Terrell Kirk, Jr.) (6:35) 2) Anthropology (Charlie Parker/John Gillespie/Walter Bishop) (5:06) 3) Body and Soul (Johnny Green/Edward Heyman/Robert Sour) (2:40) 4) Manteca (John Gillespie/Gil Fuller/Chano Pozo) (5:25) 5) At the End of the Night (Fernando Gelbard/Chico Novarro) (4:02) 6) My Little Suede Shoes (Charlie Parker) (4:26) 7) Waltz for Debby (Bill Evans) (5:10) 8) The Eternal Triangle (Edward "Sonny" Stitt) (3:45) 9) Falling in Love with Love (Richard Rodgers/Lorenz Hart) (5:24) 10) Sail Away (Tom Harrell) (6:09) 11) But Beautiful (Johnny Burke/Jimmy Van Heusen) (5:37) 12) A Beautiful Friendship (Donald Kahn/Stanley Styne) (6:33) 13) The Song is You (Jerome Kern/Oscar Hammerstein II) (5:50) Sam Most, C Haynes Flute with a Goodman headjoint; G Artley Alto Flute; C Monnig Bass Flute Mark Waggoner, Guitar Benjamin May, Bass Produced by Fernando Gelbard Recording Engineer: Rick Luxenberg Recorded in Beverly Hills, California, December 6 and 7, 2000. Mixed by Fernando Gelbard and Daniel May, Band Ade Studios, Long Beach California. Post production by Mark Vincent, Multi Media Music Recording Studios, Hollywood, California Mastering: Kurt Lundvall, Lundvall Mastering, Jersey City, New Jersey. Photography: Fernando Gelbard Production Assistant: Amanda Pelaez Cover Design: Fernando Gelbard, Luis Siquot, Maria Puga Lareo Art Direction: Maria Puga Lareo www.liquidjazz.com SIMPLY FLUTE What you have in your hands is an invitation to enjoy the living legacy of one of the authentic innovators in jazz music. Born in 1930, Sam Most's professional career started in the late forties, when he played with the orchestras of Tommy Dorsey, Boyd Raeburn, and Don Redman, gaining experience for his first session as a leader, which would take place in 1953. By then, and although he was equally conversant with the tenor saxophone and the clarinet, he was also a brilliant flutist ¬– later on, the flute would be his main instrument. Dubbed by legendary jazz critic Leonard Feather as “the father of jazz flute,” Sam was, back in the 50s, one of the first musicians to introduce the flute as a prime jazz instrument, which until then only had, if any at all, a secondary place among wind instruments in jazz instrumentation. Although some early ragtime arrangements included parts for flute and piccolo, the flute, because of its low volume and “thin” sound, was not commonly used in jazz ensembles until the 1920s, and did not truly emerge as a solo instrument until the early 50s. Already established as a multi-woodwind player, Sam worked largely in different settings from the 1950s onwards, releasing albums as a leader and along with jazz luminaries such as Paul Quinichette, Teddy Wilson, Red Norvo, Louis Bellson and Buddy Rich, to name only a few. Even though he came to be very popular within the jazz scene (a telling fact about this is that, by that time, jazz flute fans were divided into two “rival” factions, supporting either him or the other famous flutist of the time, Herbie Mann), later on Sam moved to LA and mainly worked as a studio musician rarely recording under his own name. So this is why this album must be fully, doubly celebrated: for the music it features, which is simply beautiful, and because it presents the very “father of jazz flute” in its complete, most lyrical dimension, still burning at the age of 70. Offering an interesting program which combines be-bop tunes and well-known standards, the album kicks off with pianist Bob Dorough’s classic, Devil May Care, and from the very first notes any doubt regarding Most’s sidemen for this session immediately vanishes. Both Benjamin May on the bass and Mark Waggoner on guitar conform a formidable rhythmic engine, providing the perfect beat for Sam’s melodic inventiveness throughout the entire album. Just as pianists Nat “King” Cole and Ahmad Jamal used to do with their acclaimed trios, here Sam gets rid of any drumming or percussion, and leads the bass and the guitar into a swinging excursion that includes heated numbers like Dizzy Gillespie’s Manteca or Charlie Parker’s My Little Suede Shoes and Anthropology, building a truly contagious, danceable swing (and again, without a drummer!). Sam’s powerful, at times rasping attack remains as impressive as ever, showing a perfect command of his instrument that enables him to improvise at ease, both in fast and slow numbers. Calmer moments come, and Sam offers his most gentle side in At the End of the Night (producer Fernando Gelbard’s and Argentinean singer-composer Chico Novarro’s contribution) and But Beautiful, which opens with a heartfelt intro by May playing bowed, cello-like bass at a very slow tempo. As the music unfolds, more familiar melodies arise; their inner beauty is transformed into something new by these artists’ talent. Indeed, it doesn’t matter that we have already listened to these and the rest of the tunes hundreds of times before. As true creators do, Sam still finds new ways to express himself with originality and spontaneity, delivering meaningful messages through these pieces that form a whole tradition. A tradition that he, certainly, has enormously helped to build. Miguel Bronfman Jazz critic for the daily Buenos Aires Herald Copyright © 2008 LiquidJazz.com All rights reserved.
  1. Devil May Care
  2. Anthropology
  3. Body and Soul
  4. Manteca
  5. At the End of the Night
  6. My Little Suede Shoes
  7. Waltz for Debby
  8. The Eternal Triangle
  9. Falling in Love With Love
  10. Sail Away
  11. But Beautiful
  12. A Beautiful Friendship
  13. The Song Is You
Any Time Any Season Cover
  • Any Time Any Season
  • Jazz
  • Sam Most
  • 06/26/2008
  • Any Time Any Season
Liner Notes: 1) MY FUNNY VALENTINE (Richard Rodgers) (5:20) 2) LIKE SOMEONE IN LOVE (Burke/Van Heusen) (4:40) 3) DAYS OF WINE AND ROSES (Henry Mancini) (3:43) 4) MY OLD FLAME (Johnson/Coslow) (3:44) 5) LOVER (Richard Rodgers) (3:55) 6) ANY TIME ANY SEASON (Fernando Gelbard/Sam Most) (5:40) 7) TWO FOR THE ROAD (Henry Mancini) (4:21) 8) YESTERDAYS (Jerome Kern) (3:35) 9) SPRING IS HERE (Richard Rodgers) (4:31) ALBUM CREDITS SAM MOST, Flute, Alto Flute, Bass Flute FRANK COLLETT, Piano and Piano Arrangements THE U.K. STRING ORCHESTRA, Conducted by Jorge Calandrelli String Arrangements by: JORGE CALANDRELLI, tracks 1), 3) and 6) DORI CAYMMI, tracks 4) and 7) CHRISTIAN CHEVALIER, track 9) Produced by Fernando Gelbard for (p) ©1987 Art Sound Productions, Inc. licenced to (p) ©2008 LiquidJazz.com Recording Engineer: Phil Sheridan Associate Producer: Mitchell Glickman Mixing by Phil Sheridan, Fernando Gelbard, Jorge Calandrelli Recorded March 26-27 1986 at Sage & Sound Studios, Hollywood, CA Strings Recorded August 5; Mixed August 6-7 1986 at CTS Studios, London, England Mastering: Michael Bashears (Dave Pell Digital) Peter Norman (McClear Place), Maria Puga Lareo (My Keter Records) Original Digital Recording Cover Design: Charles Reimers, Ed Francis Art Direction: Maria Puga Lareo Photos: Ken Roupenian www.LiquidJazz.com LINER NOTES BY GENE LEES: ANY TIME ANY SEASON Producer Fernando Gelbard plays both piano and flute. So does Sam Most. (And so did Bill Evans). Frank Collett plays only piano, although he does that superbly. And in a manner—as he is quick to tell you—that reflects his admiration for the late and very much lamented Mr. Evans, whose experience with the flute was almost certainly influential in the development of that golden tone he had. Fernando, who knows whereof he speaks, says that he would like to play piano like Frank Collett and flute like Sam Most. There being an element of fantasy fulfillment in the work of any conscientious producer, Fernando put the two of them together to play for a private party in 1986. The results were so attractive that he proposed to Frank and Sam that the two of them record a duo album. Sam Most is widely considered to be the pioneer of jazz flute. Experiments with the instrument as an improvising voice go back to the 1930s, but Leonard Feather, whose fix on the history of jazz is quite acute, has said, “Justice should demand that the history books document Most’s role as the first truly creative jazz flutist.” Whoever was the very first to do it, the late Charles Mingus, who was not given to careless praise, said of Sam, “He is the world’s greatest jazz flute player,” and Hubert Laws has said that Sam was one of his inspirations from the beginning. Born in Atlantic City December 16, 1930, Sam became highly visible (or rather audible) as a jazz flutist in the early 1950s. In the 60s he played with Buddy Rich, Louis Bellson, and Red Norvo, then settled in California to alternate between studio and jazz work. Eleven years his junior, Frank Collett was born in Brooklyn May 31, 1941. Like so many of the best jazz pianists—going all the way back to the 1920s, contrary to legend—Frank had very good legitimate piano training, more than ten years of it. He played gigs in New York City in the 1960s, then took part in the considerable migration to Los Angeles that was then under way. He worked for two years with Shelly Manne, was Carmen McRae’s accompanist for some time, then Sarah Vaughan’s for two years. Both ladies being accomplished pianists themselves, and singers being particularly fussy about pianists, these two tenures tell you much about his responsive sensitivity. And that is the quality so necessary to the duo format originally planned for this album. Part way through the sessions, Fernando began to think about adding strings. The project was already somewhat international, and it soon became more so. Fernando is from Argentina. And he had brought Phil Sheridan out to L.A. from Toronto for the sessions. Now he put three arrangers to work on the string writing—Jorge Calandrelli, a fellow Argentinian now resident in California, Christian Chevalier in France, and Dori Caymmi in Brazil. And he decided to add the strings in England, for the good reason that they have good strings in England, and engaged the U.K. String Orchestra. Jorge Calandrelli went with him to conduct. The album was completed and mixed in August 1986. The tunes are standards, excepting “Any Time Any Season,” an original that Fernando and Sam wrote for the session. The chord changes on “Spring is Here,” Frank says, came from Bill Evans. “I transcribed them from his ‘Portrait in Jazz’ album,” Frank said. The string writing is by Christian Chevalier. Interestingly, two of the tunes are by another man who happens to play flute and piano, Henry Mancini. “Days Of Wine And Roses,” which has a lyric by Johnny Mercer, has been a huge standard for years with both singers and jazz players. Sam plays bass flute on this track. The instrument, a complicated arrangement of pipes that has been called the plumber’s nightmare, is little used in the symphonic repertoire because it has very little projection, unless you use it close to a microphone. It was almost single-handedly brought into film scoring by Henry Mancini, who happens to know about flutes, to attain dark and mysterious dramatic effects. And that’s what the instrument does here. Note Jorge Calandrelli’s string writing on this track. The other Mancini tune heard here is nowhere near as well-known. “Two for the Road” is from a marvelous bittersweet comedy that starred Audrey Hepburn and Albert Finney. It sank swiftly from sight, taking with it, alas, one of Hank’s most affecting scores. This is the main theme. Frank has been playing it for years. The writing on this one is by Dori Caymmi. Three of the tunes—“Like Someone in Love,” “Lover,” and “Yesterdays”—are left in their original format. The piano is a difficult instrument to record. All sorts of techniques are used to mike it, many of them bad. Phil Sheridan got a truly superb piano sound on this album. The instrument used was a six-foot-seven Mason and Hamlin. And Frank has a gorgeous crystalline touch. It could have been lost with the wrong engineer. Phil Sheridan caught it. You do not often hear piano sound like this on records. So there you have it—Any Time Any Season. And any pensive hour of the night, for an album like this. Gene Lees Copyright (p) © 2008 LiquidJazz.com. All rights reserved.
  1. My Funny Valentine
  2. Like Someone in Love
  3. Days of Wine and Roses
  4. My Old Flame
  5. Lover
  6. Any Time Any Season
  7. Two for the Road
  8. Yesterdays
  9. Spring Is Here
Organic Flute Cover
  • Organic Flute
  • Jazz, Jazz
  • Sam Most - Joe Bagg - Mark Ferber
  • 03/14/2010
  • Organic Flute
Liner Notes: 1 Speak Low (Kurt Weill and Ogden Nash) (7:46) 2 Bluesette (Toots Thielemans) (5.55) 3 Yesterdays (Jerome Kern and Otto Harbach) (6:18) 4 The Nearness Of You (Hoagy Carmichael and Ned Washington ) (6:45) 5 Darn That Dream ( Jimmy Van Heusen and Eddie DeLange) (6:42) 6 So In Love (Cole Porter) (6:40) 7 Relaxin' at Camarillo (Charlie Parker) (5:09) 8 We'll Be Together Again (Carl Fischer and Frankie Laine) (7:18) 9 Pensativa (Clare Fischer) (8:04) 10 Indiana (James Hanley and Ballard McDonald) (4:59) 11 Blue Daniel (Frank Rosolino) (4:56) 12 Your Stepped Out Of A Dream (Nacio Herb Brown and Gus Kahn) ( (6:05) Sam Most, flutes Joe Bagg, organ Mark Ferber, drums Produced by Fernando Gelbard Recorded at Multi Media Music, Hollywood, California by Mark Vincent, January 2009 Mixed by Fernando Gelbard and Sam Most at same studio Mastering and art direction by Maria Puga Lareo, My Keter Records, New York Photos: Mark Vincent, Fernando Gelbard Liner notes: Scott Yanow Special thanks to Jazz Flutist Dr. Edgardo Falero, Canelones, Uruguay (p) © 2010 LiquidJazz.com LTD (BVI) www.LiquidJazz.com Email: LiquidJazz@gmail.com SAM MOST - ORGANIC FLUTE Listening to Sam Most throughout this CD, it is very difficult to believe that he is almost 80. On the second selection, “Bluesette,” he plays the melody chorus fairly straight while organist Joe Bagg and drummer Mark Ferber create a furious double-time behind the flutist. Considering Most's age, it would not have been surprising if he had decided to just treat this song as an excuse to make a brief and thoughtful statement. But once the melody is out of the way, he increases the excitement with a dazzling solo that finds him not just being swept up in the intensity generated by his sidemen, but leading the way, playing with the energy of a musician in his twenties. While Sam Most is also a fine cool-toned tenor-saxophonist, has cut full albums on which the focus was on his very impressive clarinet playing, and is a witty singer, his most significant musical legacy is as a flutist. Prior to him leading his first record date in 1953 and especially before he joined Tommy Dorsey's orchestra in 1948, the number of jazz flute players could easily be counted on one hand. Alberto Socarras was the first jazz flutist to record, back in 1927 with Clarence Williams, but performed relatively little jazz after 1933. Wayman Carver was in the spotlight on a handful of recordings that he made with Chick Webb's Little Chicks, but otherwise was buried in the saxophone section of Webb's big band. Larry Binyon in the early 1930s and Harry Klee in the mid-to-late 1940s added an occasional flute passage, and bandleader Jimmie Lunceford on a broadcast once played flute on “Holiday For Strings.” But that is pretty much it for the pre-Most history of the jazz flute. Born in 1930, Sam Most was inspired by his older brother, clarinetist Abe Most. After joining Dorsey, he had stints in big bands led by Boyd Raeburn and Don Redman before becoming a busy part of the New York cool jazz scene of the 1950s. Frank Wess with Count Basie's orchestra, James Moody, Buddy Collette, Herbie Mann and Rahsaan Roland Kirk (who emulated Most's ability to hum through his flute when he played) soon followed, but Most was on the scene first and set the standard. He relocated permanently to Los Angeles in the early 1960s, appearing on a countless number of sessions as a studio musician, occasionally teaming up with Abe as the Most Brothers, and always being available to jam with the top straight ahead jazz players. Producer Fernando Gelbard, a flutist himself, first heard a Sam Most record in 1958. They have been friends ever since meeting in 1976, and have worked together on other projects, most notably three albums for the LiquidJazz.com label. These include Most's unprecedented recording Solo Flute, which features his unaccompanied solos on alto flute. For "Organic Flute", Most is joined by two of his favorite sidemen. Joe Bagg, who is considered by many to be the top jazz organist based in the Los Angeles area, is an equally talented pianist. He has the ability to uplift every session on which he appears. Mark Ferber, who has spent time living both in Los Angeles and New York, like Bagg has appeared with the who's who of jazz, always adding swing, color and an element of unpredictability. On this project, Sam Most, Joe Bagg and Mark Ferber perform a dozen top-notch jazz standards. Due to the flute-organ-drums instrumentation, which is not exactly common, and the abilities of the masterful players, all of the selections sound fresh and creative. The opening “Speak Low” swings from the start. Most sounds quite distinctive on flute, Bagg comps and contributes heated bass lines, and Ferber keeps the momentum flowing. On “Bluesette,” in addition to Most's remarkably fluent solo, most impressive is Bagg's rapid bass lines generated by his feet; it is not a talent that should be taken for granted. On “Yesterdays,” Most plays the melody beautifully before eating up the chord changes with a lot of original ideas. The flutist caresses the theme during a heartfelt “The Nearness Of You” and the trio performs a tasteful and melodic version of “Darn That Dream.” “So In Love” is given a particularly catchy and danceable treatment. Their version of “Relaxin' At Camarillo” revives the famous eccentric introduction of pianist Dodo Marmorosa. Most comes up one inventive idea after another during his seven chorus solo. The remainder of this highly enjoyable outing includes an expressive version of “We'll Be Together Again,” a cooking “Pensativa,” an uptempo romp on “Indiana,” a medium-tempo exploration of “Blue Daniel,” and the closer, a rendition of “You Stepped Out Of A Dream” that is a little funky. The trio sounds pretty reluctant to end this piece, and listeners will have the same feeling when the outing comes to an end. Fortunately pushing the repeat button is pretty simple! Throughout his career, which has now lasted over 60 years, Sam Most has always delighted and impressed audiences. Organic Flute adds to his musical legacy and is quite fun to hear. Scott Yanow, author of ten books including The Jazz Singers, Trumpet Kings, Bebop, Jazz On Record 1917-76 and Jazz On Film
  1. Speak Low
  2. Bluesette
  3. Yesterdays
  4. The Nearness of You
  5. Darn That Dream
  6. So in Love
  7. Relaxin' at Camarillo
  8. We'll Be Together Again
  9. Pensativa
  10. Indiana
  11. Blue Daniel
  12. You Stepped out of a Dream...
Ego Jazz Band De Free Cover
  • Ego Jazz Band De Free
  • Jazz, Jazz
  • Pocho Lapouble & Fernando Gelbard
  • 03/26/2009
  • Ego Jazz Band De Free
Liner Notes: 1) EGO, LUEGO EXISTEN (19:50) 2) TEMA DE FATIGA (6:35) 3) SHH…BEA DUERME (2:57) 4) AMBIENTEX (7:34) a) TEMA PARA CONTRAFLACO b) CANCION DE CUNY MUSICIANS: POCHO LAPOUBLE, drums FERNANDO GELBARD, Fender Rhodes® piano, flute SANTIAGO GIACOBBE, piano, keyboards JORGE LOPEZ RUIZ, bass JORGE "EL NEGRO" GONZALEZ, bass EDUARDO GIOVINAZZO, trumpet JAIME PRATS, alto sax HECTOR STARC, electric guitars NORBERTO MINICHILLO, percussion SOLOS: TRACK 1): F. Gelbard (Fender Rhodes® piano), H. Starc (guit.), J. Lopez Ruiz (bass), J. Prats (asax), P. Lapouble (dms), N. Minichillo (perc.),J. Lopez Ruiz (bass), S. Giacobbe (pno), E. Giovinazzo (tpt) TRACK 2): S. Giacobbe (pno), F. Gelbard (flute), H. Starc (guit) TRACK 3): E. Giovinazzo (tpt) TRACK 4): J. Lopez Ruiz (bass), J. Prats (asax), F. Gelbard (Fender Rhodes® piano), E. Giovinazzo (tpt) All tunes composed by Pocho Lapouble and published by Gelbard Publishing, ASCAP. Produced by Walter Thiers and Fernando Gelbard Recording Engineer: Carlos Piriz Recorded May 7th. and June 11th. 1972 at Estudios ION, Buenos Aires Cedar denoising processed by Sean 'Big P' Pennycook. Remastered by Gareth Williams at Sound Recording Technology, Cambridge, April 2004 Digital release mastering by Maria Puga Lareo, My Keter Records, New York, 2009 Cover Painting: Paulina Berlatzky ©2004 Whatmusic.com, Whatmusic Holdings LTD ©2009 LiquidJazz.com LTD (BVI) Licensed by Whatmusic.com and Pocho Lapouble. www.LiquidJazz.com ™ LINER NOTES: HEAR EGO! Buenos Aires, May 7th, 1972. A group of eight musicians (six Argentineans and two Uruguayans) gather at Estudios Ion, where so much good music has been put onto tape. What they create may be described as somewhat in between Ornette Coleman's and Miles Davis' ways of dealing with musical 'freedom'. Argentina was then going through hard times and a lot more hardships lay ahead. To jazz musicians, though, time was also ripe for dreams of success: after all Lalo Schifrin and Gato Barbieri were making it on the international jazz scene. Not that they took themselves for geniuses, they simply thought local jazz needed some shock treatment and trying their hand at some avant-garde music would hurt no one. Furthermore, they ranked among the best jazz players in Argentina. The two bassists in the group, Jorge López Ruiz and Jorge González, for instance, had both played with Gato Barbieri. López Ruiz had been the bassist of a legendary quintet led by Lalo Schifrin in 1956, whose saxophone player was Gato. González had been the bassist of Gato's regular rhythm section of the 1960s. Pocho Lapouble, the drummer, besides playing with the cream of Argentina's jazzmen, had been the percussionist of an (unrecorded) Astor Piazzolla sextet from 1968-1969 – the pianist and the guitarist in that group were jazz musicians too. Norberto Minichillo, percussionist in this record, but also an all-round drummer, was also playing avant-garde tango with a quintet that had Dino Saluzzi on bandonéon. Keyboardist Santiago Giacobbe had played many times with Gato Barbieri and was later to be the organist in Astor Piazzolla's 'Electric Group' of the mid-1970s. Fernando Gelbard, a well known jazzman, who had played with Gato Barbieri and Chivo Borraro ('El Nuevo Sonido de Chivo Borraro', Whatmusic.com WMLP/CD-0027), appears here on Fender piano and flute. A bit younger than Giacobbe, Gelbard was at the time of this record asserting himself as a very capable musician and also a pioneer in the field of synthesizers, which were really newcomers to jazz in the early 1970s and a rarity in Argentina (‘Blues Para Un Cosmonauta’, Whatmusic.com MLP/CD-0028). Héctor Starc, the guitarist, was a young and inventive rock player. Eduardo 'Pestaña' Giovinazzo on trumpet and Jaime Prats on alto had moved from Montevideo, Uruguay, to Buenos Aires and they sure belonged in this group of high-caliber jazz musicians. Just listen to Giovinazzo's showcase 'Shhh… Bea Duerme'. The four pieces in this album were composed by Pocho Lapouble, who was the driving force behind the project. One side of the original LP is taken by 'Ego, luego existen' ('Ego, therefore they exist') where everyone gets a chance to solo, 'Ego' is a long excursion which deserves some particular attention. The tune is quite Ornettish, the more so because it is stated by trumpet and alto in unison. Gelbard plays the first solo on Fender piano very much in one of the epochal trends: aggressively rooted in rhythm, searching, never relenting, then going into a dialogue with bassist López Ruiz, who takes over. Then we are lead into Starc's guitar solo, itself evolving in a discussion with López Ruiz's bass before letting Ruiz solo anew and sort of fade into a new Gelbard Fender piano solo. López Ruiz soloes once again, followed by Giacobbe's organ. An alto solo by Prats, relayed by Lapouble's drums, speaks with Minichillo's percussion, a conversation almost interrupted by Giacobbe's two handed solo: one of his hands plays the organ while the other one plays a Bluthner piano; then it's Giovinazzo's turn on trumpet. Throughout this piece the shifting and contrasting tempos and moods sound at one and the same time tightly controlled, yet spontaneous. The 6/8 tempo of the final part is a kind of 'tumbao' reminiscent of a related afro-argentinean folk rhythm, the 'chacarera'. 'Tema de Fatiga', stated in unison by the trumpet and the flute, is made up of successive solos by Giacobbe, Gelbard on flute and Starc. There you have gentle Giacobbe clearly showing his bop and hard bop roots, contrasting with Gelbard's Dolphy-oriented but open-minded flute solo. Gelbard's 'Dolphy-ness' is quite unusual for him, but reveals his avant-garde leanings at the time of this record. Starc follows with his rock-oriented free jazz rooted in the blues. 'Ambientex' is in two parts. The first one, titled 'Tema para Contraflaco', is a pun on contrabass – string bass – that could be translated into English as 'Theme for Contraskinny', López Ruiz's nickname being 'Flaco' (Skinny). The second part, 'Canción de Cuny', is given to solos by Prats, Gelbard and Giovinazzo. Let me now tell you how much I enjoyed listening to this album from the early 1970s. I wonder why we have been so forgetful of these – and other Argentinean jazz recorded testimonies – beauties sleeping in the vaults. Most Argentine jazz musicians of the 1960s and 1970s were part of a middle class bourgeoisie that did not react against the 'establishment' and seemed to feel comfortable playing traditional jazz, swing or bebop. Their entrance into avant-garde and musical experimentation was a big risk within their conservative social environment. But they were right, for their music was accepted by jazz audiences and some of the incredible musical works of this avant-garde gang were fortunately recorded and more fortunately re-released in the 21st Century Norberto Gimelfarb – Yverdon, Switzerland, 2003 Copyright (p) ©2009 LiquidJazz.com LTD (BVI). All rights reserved.
  1. Ego, Luego Existen
  2. Tema De Fatiga
  3. Shh... Bea Duerme
  4. Ambientex
El Convidado Cover
  • El Convidado
  • Jazz, World
  • Enrico Rava & Fernando Gelbard
  • 06/23/2009
  • El Convidado
Liner Notes: 1) BARCO HASTA EL CIELO (Enrico Rava) (08:13) 2) DARN THAT DREAM (Vah Heusen- De Lange) (02:33) 3) ATE UM DIA (Joao Donato) (09:19) 4) CHICO (Chivo Borraro) (14:46) 5) ENRICO SEIS OCTAVOS (ENRICO 6/8) (Chango Farias Gomez) (07:13) ENRICO RAVA, trumpet FERNANDO GELBARD, Steinway and Fender Rhodes pianos NESTOR ASTARITA, drums ADALBERTO CEVASCO, bass CHANGO FARIAS GOMEZ, percussion, vocalese Produced by Nano Herrera Reissue produced by Fernando Gelbard for LiquidJazz.com LTD (BVI) Recording engineer: Carlos Piriz (1975) Recorded at Estudios Audion, Buenos Aires, December 1975 Cedar original vinyl LP denoising: Sean "Big P" Pennycook, London Mastering: Fernando Gelbard & Mark Vincent, Multi Media Studios, Hollywood Photography: Gianni Mestichelli (1975) Art direction & Cover design: Maria Puga Lareo, New York Under license from Phono Musical Argentina Special thanks to Alfredo Radoszynski and Carlos Garber ©2009 LiquidJazz.com LTD (BVI) EL CONVIDADO In december 1975 Enrico Rava was in Buenos Aires, where he had familiy ties. The Italian trumpeter, then on his way to becoming one of the world’s leading jazz musicians, was at that time well known, living in New York and associated with the free jazz avant-garde of the 1970’s. He had been in Buenos Aires for the first time in 1966, as a member of soprano saxist Steve Lacy’s quartet which also included two South Africans: bassist Johnny Dyani and drummer Louis Moholo. The quartet stayed there longer than expected because, not having been paid for its performance, it was stranded. The group eventually recorded an LP: The Forest and the Zoo. Rava’s 1975 visit also brought about an album : Aga Taura Confab—El Convidado. The idea was to record the guest trumpeter with four of the very best Argentinean musicians: pianist Fernando Gelbard, bassist Adalberto Cevasco, drummer Néstor Astarita and percussionist Juan “Chango” Farías Gómez (who is better known simply as Chango Farías). This album, from now on called El Convidado, is a re-release of that legendary LP, for all purposes lost after its original release in 1975/76. Producer Fernando Gelbard negotiated the licensing from the master's owner for www.liquidjazz.com LTD (BVI) for wordlwide ditribution. It is a restored version of the original album by super denoiser Sean "Big P" Pennycook (London), with added values: the until now unpublished recording session photos—photographer Gianni Mestichelli had fortunately kept all the original negatives—and the new artistic design of the album by talented singer, musician, producer and harmony partner María Puga Lareo. El Convidado was originally produced by the late and legendary Nano Herrera, friend of all musicians and a man of great musical taste, moved by an enormous love of jazz. Label boss Carlos Garber and producer Nano Herrera gathered the personnel: a quintet made up of four qualified jazz musicians—Rava, Gelbard, Cevasco, Astarita— and an equally qualified Argentinean folk musician with jazz affinities—Chango Farías, in what was possibly his first recorded jazz incursion. His being included in the group probably stems from the pervading fusion and avant-garde mood of the time, but also from the fact that some Argentinean jazzmen were experimenting with the idea of a jazz-local folk music fusion: Chango’s tune “Enrico Seis Octavos” on this album is an illustration of that idea. I remember having seen Chango on scene in the 1960’s surrounded by a “folk drums set” of his own design to play his inventive folk music and rhythms! The recording session that brought about El Convidado lasted for several hours: it was a wholly improvised business, though the results are there to prove that a jazz attitude yields unexpected and unpretentious beautiful music. The kind of fusion attempted in this album is a mixture of milesdavisish and free jazz avant-garde (listen to “Chico”) but at the same time a nostalgic plunge into melodious tunes—“Darn That Dream” or “Até um dia”— as a means of not losing the ties with a recent past and tradition. The guest, in Spanish “El Convidado”, Rava we have already introduced, but what about the other musicians? Producer, pianist, flutist, keyboardist, composer—all around macher—Fernando Gelbard plays here a Steinway piano on “Darn That Dream”, a duet with Rava, and a Fender Rhodes 1973 piano on the other numbers. Gelbard has always been a jazz buff and a jazz musician and a good one. For several years now he has been busy digging up recordings in which he was involved in Buenos Aires in the 60’s and 70’s, as a tribute to the Argentinean jazzmen of his generation (Gelbard was born in the 1940’s), many of them also good friends of his. Those albums have not had a wide distribution and they certainly deserved a better fate. As a musician and/or producer, Gelbard has recorded or played with musicians of the caliber of Rob McConnell, Sam Most, Frank Collett, Phil Woods, Guido Basso, Carl Saunders, Jorge Calandrelli, Bob Florence, Gato Barbieri, Chivo Borraro among many others. Adalberto Cevasco became internationally known as a member of Gato Barbieri’s groups of the 1970’s: he toured with Gato extensively, played at jazz festivals like Newport and Montreux and recorded two great albums by Gato: Latin America Chapter 1 and Latin America Chapter 2. Cevasco’s talents have been also required by another master musician: Astor Piazzolla, who in 1974-1976 lead a group, the Electronic Octet, which included a majority of musicians with a jazz background. Another first rate musician, pianist, composer, arranger, conductor Lalo Schifrin took him as soloist in 1991 for two concerts with Argentina’s National Symphony Orchestra. Cevasco has worked and recorded with yet another well known Argentinean musician: Roberto “Fats” Fernández, in two recordings that gathered the best jazz and tango local musicians together with saxist Bob Mintzer, drummer Buddy Williams, violinist Michal Urbaniak, pianist Jorge Dalto (who by the way was an Argentinean living in the United States). Another jazz musician who has always been much attached to the music he loves is drummer Néstor Astarita—he has always played his best and very often with the best: suffice it be said he was Gato Barbieri’s drummer before Gato left Argentina in the 1960’s, and that he played with pianists Enrique Villegas and Baby López Furst (two great pianists from Argentina), besides having been Enrico Rava’s drummer in 1974, with whom he made two albums. In Argentina and abroad Astarita has played with Lionel Hampton, Ella Fitzgerald, Herb Geller, Lalo Schifrin, Friedrich Gulda, Curtis Fuller, Kenny Dorham, Jorge Dalto, Cat Anderson, Charlie Mariano, Michel Legrand, Roy Eldrige, E. Hall, Wild Bill Davis. Chango Farías Gómez is a percussionist, singer, arranger, composer. Primarily a folk musician, he has always been open minded and open eared, looking for ways of enriching his own music. Still in the 1970’s he was regarded by many as an outsider: his music was considered inauthentic. But as much as Piazzolla, in the tango field, had to fight that kind of opposition from the public and in the end came out as a winner, so Chango Farías has gained recognition beyond barriers. He introduced a harmonic and rhythmic approach to Argentinean folk music that was jazz and XXth century music oriented. In 1982 he presented a show called “Los amigos de Chango” (Friends of Chango’s) where the approach was improvisatory and free jazz oriented. He has been successful and his militantism has led him to become an important political figure whose main goal is the protection and advancement of music and culture in general. What about the music in this album ? “Un barco hasta el cielo” (Enrico Rava). Enrico Rava (trumpet), Fernando Gelbard (Fender Rhodes piano), Chango Farías Gómez (percussion), Néstor Astarita (drums) and Adalberto Cevasco (Fender bass). It gets started with drums and percussion, then bass and Fender Rhodes piano added, over which Rava plays freely until he states the theme, which the bass takes up. The theme is a rhythmic-melodic statement alternately found as a melodic or rhythmic element. Rava then plays short phrases around the theme, followed by a multi-note bout alternating with plaintive short phrases. Next Rava uses mordente and frullato effects until the bass takes over. There follows a bass solo partaken with the electric piano. In comes Rava again leading into a general dissolving of the thematic material, a certain pointillism, until the whole group dissolves slowly into silence. “Darn That Dream” (Jimmy Van Heusen-Eddie DeLange). Enrico Rava (trumpet), Fernando Gelbard (Steinway piano). This version of “Darn That Dream”, the magnificent Jimmy Van Heusen’s 1939 ballad, is a rarity since there are not that many trumpet-piano duets in the history of jazz. Furthermore Enrico Rava and Gelbard do achieve a beautifully poignant rendering of the tune. It is actually a solo by Rava, accompanied by robust Gelbard’s pianisms. A short, very short delight. “Até um dia” (João Donato). Enrico Rava (trumpet), Fernando Gelbard (Fender Rhodes piano), Chango Farías Gómez (percussion), Néstor Astarita (drums) and Adalberto Cevasco (bass). A tune by João Donato is always welcome, furthermore if it is interpreted the way it is here: with a bit of Brazilian taste, the funky help of Cevasco’s electric bass and the all over love for its beauty shown by everyone. It’s one of those Brazilian melodies reminiscent of a Latin bolero. Rava states the melody, then takes over the improvised part, in a boppish—with for instance a quotation of Miles Davis’ “Four”—approach full of melodic content. The accompanists show their contentedness by adhering strictly to Rava’s lyrical lead. Then in comes Gelbard with a deliberately delicate approach, as though his Fender Rhodes piano were a caressed vibraphone, before Rava’s coming back lyrical at first then tongue in cheek “heavy.” “Chico” (Horacio Borraro). Enrico Rava (trumpet), Fernando Gelbard (Fender Rhodes piano), Chango Farías Gómez (percussion), Néstor Astarita (drums) and Adalberto Cevasco (bass). A multifaceted tune by Borraro. It begins with an ad lib part led by Rava’s trumpet, which oscillates between a lyricism reminiscent of the rhapsodic side of Harry James, without James’ schmaltz. Then there is an acceleration and the mood becomes more hectic it being Gelbard’s turn to get into Rava’s way, though it quickly turns into a Latin-Brazilian melodic phase, always led by Rava’s trumpet, this time undisputedly, until Cevasco’s bass has its turn. There follows a dialog Gelbard-Cevasco (Fender Rhodes-electric bass) that leads into a new phase: the Fender and the bass make it a walking bass straight ahead impro, Gelbard soloing in a classically jazzy straight ahead way, but then both musicians go into a less walking phase and it slowly turns into a ballad. Then Rava comes back straight ahead : the new part lies between a ballad and a more driving mood, while the rhythm section develops a sort of riff. More lyrical Rava until a new turn to ad libbing before, near the end, the seams burst out. “Enrico Seis Octavos” (Chango Farías Gómez). Chango’s voice opens the proceedings with a sort of baguala chant before his percussion and Cevasco’s bass set the overall rhythmic frame: an Argentine chacarera rhythm. But there’s also Cevasco’s bass with surprising melodic-rhythmic turns, like a kind of grunt-sigh on an apoggiatura, imitating a plaintive human voice. The chacarera is a dance with African influenced rhythmic figures, from Argentina’s north-west. Its 6/8 signature can also be looked as a 12/16 which is subdivided into four times 3/16, hence it has the typical Afro double feeling : the listener feels the simultaneous ternary (6/8) and binary (12/16=4x3/16) sides of the rhythm pattern. Rava’s trumpet gets freely into the overall frame in a plaintive way, of course Rava himself acknowledges Miles’ influence as well as Chet Baker’s on his playing. Cevasco’s bass sounds great here : like a madman playing very rational electric bass. You may be reading these notes after getting acquainted with the music they purports to be an introduction to. I’m thus left to wish we agree that it was worth the listening. Let me tell you that if we dont’ meet eye to eye, do we at least meet ear to ear? Norberto Gimelfarb, Ballaigues, Switzerland
  1. Barco Hasta El Cielo
  2. Darn That Dream
  3. Ate Um Dia
  4. Chico
  5. Enrico Seis Octavos
Solo Flute Cover
  • Solo Flute
  • Jazz
  • Sam Most
  • 11/20/2009
  • Solo Flute
Liner Notes: 1) THE SONG IS ME (Sam Most) (4:00) 2) AUTUMN IN NEW YORK (Vernon Duke) (5:17) 3) SPEEDY SWING (Sam Most) (3:37) 4) GIANT STEPS (John Coltrane) (3:18) 5) INDIAN SUMMER (Victor Herbert) (3:47) 6) INDIE TUNE (Sam Most) (2:54) 7) JUST FRIENDS (John Klenner/Sam M. Lewis) (3:05) 8) LUSH LIFE (Billy Strayhorn) (5:10) 9) PENSATIVA (Clare Fischer) (5:02) 10) STABLEMATES (Benny Golson) (4:23) 11) THE SONG IS YOU (Jerome Kern) (4:45) 12) ALL THE THINGS YOU ARE (Jerome Kern) (5:17) 13) YOU DON’T KNOW WHAT LOVE IS (Gene de Paul/ Don Raye) (4:18) 14) YOU STEPPED OUT OF A DREAM (Nacio Herb Brown/Gus Kahn) (4:06) SAM MOST, G Alto Flute Produced by Fernando Gelbard Production Coordinator, Maria Puga Lareo Recording Engineer, Mark Vincent Recorded July 8 and 9 , 2009 at Multi Media Studios, Hollywood Mastering, Kurt Lundvall, Lundvall Mastering, Jersey City, New Jersey Cover design, Amanda Pelaez ©2009 LiquidJazz.com LTD (BVI) www.LiquidJazz.com Liquidjazz@gmail.com SOLO FLUTE “Solo Flute” is the latest release from jazz’ premier flautist and elder statesmen, Sam Most. For over 50 years Sam has been the innovator and cornerstone of jazz flute performance. His accolades have been sung by fellow flautists James Moody, Hubert Laws, Yusef Lateef, and Joe Farrell, to name a few. Jazz critic and historian Leonard Feather wrote, "Justice should demand that the history books document (Sam) Most's role as the first truly creative Jazz Flutist.” He also referred to Sam as “The Godfather of Jazz Flute”. Born in Atlantic City, New Jersey, the younger brother of clarinetist Abe Most, Sam cut his teeth early at the tender age of 18 with such bands as Tommy Dorsey, Shep Fields, Boyd Raeburn, and Don Redman. His first recording at the age of 23, a single entitled “Undercurrent Blues”, clearly established him as the first bop flutist. The very next year he was awarded Downbeat Magazine’s “Critic’s New Star Award”. Between the years of 1953-1958 Sam led and recorded sessions for Prestige, Debut, Vanguard, and Bethlehem, bringing the flute into the forefront of jazz improvisation. He also worked in different settings with Chris Connor, Paul Quinichette, and Teddy Wilson. After playing with Buddy Rich (1959-1961), Sam moved to Los Angeles and became a studio musician and also worked in Las Vegas and Palm Springs with Red Norvo. He resurfaced on the international scene in the late ‘70s with a series of recordings on the Xanadu label. Sam is also the author of two highly regarded instructional books on jazz improvisation. Credited with being the first to “sing” through the flute, Sam relates the story that this technique was born out of necessity….the necessity to practice and, living in an apartment, to do so quietly. Instead of playing at full volume, he would play softly and sing/hum at the same time what he was playing. This technique which Sam first demonstrated during the 1950s has since been widely used by such luminaries as Roland Kirk, Jeremy Steig and Ian Anderson of Jethro Tull. Although there’s no singing to be heard here, Sam’s latest project ventures into the rarest of all jazz settings, the truly “solo” album. No bass and drums for groove and time, no guitar or piano for harmonic content; just Sam…. his flute….the music….and you, the listener. It was Sam’s producer, Fernando Gelbard, who conceived the idea to record Sam on “Solo Flute.” When asked what gave him the idea, he simply replied, “Sam makes all the changes”. How true! Jazz improvisation is all about “playing (making) the changes.” Every song has a chord progression over which the soloist lays down his ideas. When you listen to a good soloist with a rhythm section you hear the improvised lines in relation to and outlining the chord progression supplied by the piano and guitar while the bass and drums lay down the time. But what happens when you improvise without a rhythm section? In Sam’s case, nothing much changes. Sam is so prolific and proficient, that, if you listen closely, you hear the time, groove and chord progressions in the lines he weaves. No rhythm section needed. Sam’s choice of repertoire is as diverse as his musical career. He covers such standards as “Just Friends” and “All the Things You Are” and the ballads “Autumn in New York” and “Lush Life”. But wait…there’s more! Sam really sinks his improvisational teeth into workhorses like “Giant Steps” and “Speedy Swing", Sam's composition based on Cherokee's chords), both at approximately quarter note = 230+ beats per minute (faster than my metronome will go!!). Recorded entirely on alto flute, Sam’s instantly recognizable sound is equally effective on the bop, ballads, and standards. That sound, which is both very breathy and percussive at the same time, is unmistakably Sam Most! “Solo Flute” was recorded on Sam’s Artley Alto Flute, serial number 113065, (making it approximately 40 years old) at Multi Media Studio in Hollywood, CA by Mark Vincent. If you are looking for an “easy listening album” this is not it. If you are looking for swinging, brilliant solo improvisation by one of jazz’ true geniuses, you have come to the right place… Rick Jasper Master Chief Musician, U.S. Navy Copyright ℗ ©2009 LiquidJazz.com LTD (BVI). All rights reserved.
  1. The Song Is Me
  2. Autumn in New York
  3. Speedy Swing
  4. Giant Steps
  5. Indian Summer
  6. Indie Tune
  7. Just Friends
  8. Lush Life
  9. Pensativa
  10. Stablemates
  11. The Song Is You
  12. All the Things You Are
  13. You Don't Know What Love Is...
  14. You Stepped out of a Dream...
Boss Brass and Woods Cover
  • Boss Brass and Woods
  • Jazz, Jazz
  • Rob McConnell & The Boss Brass With Phil Woods
  • 02/15/2010
  • Boss Brass and Woods
Liner Notes: Boss Brass & Woods Rob McConnell & The Boss Brass Featuring Phil Woods * Produced by Fernando Gelbard 1) OUT OF NOWHERE (Heyman-Green) (4:25) * 2) GREENHOUSE (Rick Wilkins) (7:44) 3) QUINTESSENCE (Quincy Jones) (4:02) * 4) IF DREAMS COME TRUE (Sampson, Goodman, Mills) (7:21) 5) STEREO BLUE (Rob McConnell) (5:22) * 6) JUST ONE OF THOSE THINGS (Cole Porter) (7:00) 7) TRADITIONAL PIECE (Rob McConnell) (12:17) * 8) JIVE AT FIVE (Edison-Basie) (8:09) ALBUM CREDITS: THE BOSS BRASS ARRANGED AND CONDUCTED BY ROB MCCONNELL All selections except “Greenhouse” arranged by Rob McConnell. “Greenhouse” arranged by Rick Wilkins. The Boss Brass: Moe Koffmann (alto sax, soprano sax, flute, piccolo) Jerry Toth (alto sax, flute, clarinet) Eugene Amaro (tenor sax, flute) Rick Wilkins (tenor sax, flute, clarinet) Bob Leonard (baritone sax, bass clarinet) Arnie Chycoski (lead trumpet, flugelhorn) Erich Traugott (associate lead trumpet, flugelhorn) Guido Basso (trumpet, flugelhorn) Dave Woods (trumpet, flugelhorn) John MacLeod (trumpet, flugelhorn) Rob McConnell (valve trombone) Ian McDougall (lead trombone) Bob Livingston (trombone) Dave McMurdo (trombone) Ron Hughes (bass trombone) George Stimpson (French horn) James MacDonald (French horn) Jimmy Dale (acoustic and electric piano) Ed Bickert (guitar) Steve Wallace (bass) Terry Clarke (drums) Brian Leonard (percussion) Phil Woods (guest alto sax) * Produced by Fernando Gelbard Recording Engineer: Phil Sheridan Mixed by Rob McConnell, Fernando Gelbard and Phil Sheridan Assistant: Steven Ibelshauser Mastering: Peter Norman, McClear Place (1985) & Fernando Gelbard (2010) Cover Design: Fernando Gelbard Photography: Fernando Gelbard & Barbara McDougall Digital Release produced by Fernando Gelbard for Liquidjazz.com LTD (BVI) Recorded March 11-12; Mixed March 13-14, 1985 At McClear Place, Toronto, Canada Ed Bickert appearing courtesy of Concord Records Recorded on a 24-track Sony Digital Recorder (c) (p) 1985 Art Sound Productions (c) (p) 2010 Liquidjazz.com LTD (BVI) www.LiquidJazz.com Liquidjazz@gmail.com A few words about the album (from 1985): I am listening to the tape Fernando Gelbard sent me to write something about this album. The music is so intense that I am deeply touched and filled with emotions. I have been listening to jazz for over 35 years, and I had the same feeling when I heard for the first time Mulligan’s Tentette, The Birth of the Cool or the Gil Evans Orchestra. Rob McConnell is a “one-of-a-kind” gifted creator of jazz. Like Charlie Parker, Art Tatum, Clifford Brown or Bill Evans, Rob created a new language in this case for big band. Fernando Gelbard, whom I know since the “Bop Club Argentino” in the early Fifties, is a talented musician and a sober producer. This helped in creating the good and peaceful environment necessary to make this music happen. He picked most of the tunes from Boss Brass live presentations in Toronto a couple of months before the recording session. A deal was made with Phil Woods and he arrived in Toronto on March 10, 1985. Rob, Fernando and Guido Basso went to the airport to pick him up. Rather than attempting to take Phil to a pub and dinner Fernando suggested that Phil spend the evening resting and watching TV, plus room service. He loved the idea and he did relax! He recorded his tunes on March 11th , live with the band, no overdubs, and left the next day. The Boss Brass recorded the rest of the tunes on March 12th and on the 13th. And 14Th. the album was edited and mixed. The use of multitrack digital equipment in the recording allowed Phil Sheridan to capture once more this wonderful sound, this time with an added clarity. He used as monitors two small Auratone ™ “cube” speakers at a very low volume, which is his usual way of recording. There is a nice story about one of the tunes. In 1961, Quincy Jones recorded with his band and Phil Woods”The Quintessence”, one of the most beautiful big band tunes ever made.. In 1985, Rob and Fernando decided to do it again, as a tribute to Quincy. Rob arranged it inspiredby Quincy's arrangement. Listening to both versions and trying to pick the favorite one is like trying to decide which French pastry to pick from the tray. I always liked Phil Woods, and this combination of the Boss Brass and Phil Woods is like a dream come true for jazz fans. With this group of outstanding Canadian musicians that reinvented big band, this hour of music should be from now on an intrinsic part of every jazz collection. Hugo Feliu, New York 1985
  1. Out of Nowhere
  2. Greenhouse
  3. Quintesscence
  4. If Dreams Come True
  5. Stereo Blue
  6. Just One of Those Things
  7. Traditional Piece
  8. Jive at Five
Guido Basso Cover
  • Guido Basso
  • Jazz, Jazz
  • Guido Basso
  • 03/26/2010
  • Guido Basso
Liner Notes: 1 Jitterbug Waltz (Fats Waller) 06:13 2 I Thought About You (Jimmy Van Heusen, Johnny Mercer) 05:40 3 Never Been In Love (Paul Harris, Frank Loesser) 04:57 4 Little Girl Blue (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) 06:23 5 Stablemates (Benny Golson) 05:52 6 As Time Goes By (Herman Hupfeld) 04:44 7 Born To Be Blue (Mel Torme, Robert Wells) 05:31 8 Be My Love (Nikolaus Brodszky, Sammy Kahn) 04:16 9 Peace (Horace Silver) 07:34 10 Peace Alt Take (Horace Silver) 06:11 11 Pecado (Guido Basso) 04:33 12 Pecado Alt Take (Guido Basso) 05:24 13 The Very Thought Of You (Ray Noble) 04:39 Guido Basso—flugelhorn Frank Collett—piano Andy Simpkins—bass Terry Clarke—drums Luis Baetti--- Vocal arrangement and voices on "As Time Goes By" (2010)* Producer: Fernando Gelbard, LiquidJazz.com LTD (BVI) Recording Engineer: Phil Sheridan (1986) Carlos Basurto ( As Time Goes By voices *) (Buenos Aires, 2010) Associate Producer: Mitchell Glickman (1986) Recorded and mixed June 19-20, 1986 at Sage & Sound Studios, Hollywood, CA Carlos Basurto Studio, January 10 & 11 2010 Buenos Aires, Argentina * Additional mixing, Mark Vincent at Multi Media Music, Hollywood (2010) Mastering: (2010) Fernando Gelbard from the original U-Matic digital tapes Album Design: Ed Francis, Charles Reimers, Martin Gelbard (1986) Cover Video Photography: Martin Gelbard Original CD Photography: Ken Roupenian GUIDO BASSO In 1984, Rob McConnell's Boss Brass toured California. LaRue Brown Watson, the widow of trumpeter Clifford Brown, saw the Canadian orchestra at a club and was very impressed by trumpeter Guido Basso, telling him that he should make his own record. Two years later, this set was the result. It is surprising that Guido Basso had not previously led his own album since he was 46 and had been a highly rated jazz soloist in Canada for decades. Born Sept. 27, 1937 in Montreal, Basso began playing trumpet when he was nine. He was well trained and as a teenager was already playing with local show bands. In 1957 Basso was working with the band of Maury Kaye when Vic Damone heard him and added him to his backup group. After a year with Damone, Basso toured with Louis Bellson's orchestra accompanying Pearl Bailey during 1958-60. After those valuable experiences, he moved to Toronto where he became a very busy studio musician, both on trumpet and occasionally on harmonica. He never neglected jazz, playing with vibraphonist Peter Appleyard, sometimes leading his own groups, and in 1975 working with both Dizzy Gillespie and Benny Goodman. Other associations included performances with Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Woody Herman and the Phil Nimmons 'N' Nine Plus Six. However Guido Basso is best known for being a regular member of Rob McConnell's Boss Brass for more than 30 years, from its start in 1968. By 1986, Guido Basso was long overdue to record as a leader. Producer Fernando Gelbard, whose first jazz album was Clifford Brown's Study In Brown (purchased in 1956 when he was 16), remembers being astonished when he heard Basso's playing on “Portrait Of Jenny” with Rob McConnell. While Guido Basso, who is heard exclusively on flugelhorn throughout this project, does not necessarily sound that close to Brownie, some of the spirit and warmth of Brown can be heard in his playing. For the album, Basso is teamed with a top-notch rhythm section. Pianist Frank Collett and the late bassist Andy Simpkins were on a countless number of sessions through the years in the Los Angeles area. Collett worked with Carmen McRae, the Louis Bellson Big Band, the Terry Gibbs/Buddy DeFranco Quintet, Zoot Sims, Keely Smith and Dianne Reeves. Simpkins gained some fame as a longtime member of Gene Harris' Three Sounds throughout its prime years. He also had longtime associations with George Shearing and Sarah Vaughan, and worked with Carmen McRae, Anita O'Day, Monty Alexander and Stephane Grappelli among many others. Drummer Terry Clarke is possibly the most famous of all Canadian drummers. While born in Vancouver, British Columbia, he first gained fame while living in San Francisco in 1965, becoming a member of the John Handy Quintet that caused a sensation at that year's Monterey Jazz Festival. He also worked with the Fifth Dimension before moving to Toronto. Like Basso, he became a greatly in-demand studio musician and a member of Rob McConnell's Boss Brass. Clarke also worked with Jim Hall and Oscar Peterson, and has appeared on over 300 jazz albums. Recorded in one day in Los Angeles and originally released as CD by Innovation( Canada), the music is now being reissued with three additional and previously unreleased performances. The opener, a classic version of Fats Waller's “Jitterbug Waltz,” is full of subtle surprises. Beginning as a very pretty rendition of the verse played as a duet by Basso and Collett, it evolves into a cooker by the quartet. Notice how the jazz waltz becomes a 4/4 strut during the piano solo before a flugelhorn/drums chorus and the melody statement brings it back to being both a waltz and eventually a ballad. Basso's puckish sound and wit sometimes recall Clark Terry with touches of Freddie Hubbard on “I Thought About You.” An offbeat uptempo treatment of “I've Never Been In Love Before” precedes a touching and emotional melody statement by Basso on “Little Girl Blue.” While that performance eventually goes into double time, the original thoughtful and melancholy mood returns at its close. Benny Golson's “Stablemates” features the quartet swinging joyfully with Collett taking one of his best solos of the session. “As Time Goes By” is given a unique treatment. The original version, never released before, was a duet by Basso and Collett. Producer Fernando Gelbard thought that it sounded so beautiful that he wanted to add voices. He called his friend arranger-singer Luis Baetti in Argentina, and had him arrange and record a voice choir that fit perfectly around the flugelhorn. The results are exquisite. “Born To Be Blue” receives a light Latin treatment. “Be My Love,” originally a classical melody made famous by Mario Lanza, thrives in a jubilant jazz treatment by the quartet. Horace Silver's “Peace” and Basso's “Pecado” are heard in two versions apiece including previously unknown alternate takes. Both are well worth hearing twice with the two versions of “Peace” conveying haunting moods while the catchy “Pecado” is full of infectious playing, with Basso heard at his best. The set concludes with a flugelhorn-piano duet on a beautiful version of “The Very Thought Of You.” Guido Basso has since recorded other albums, but this quartet date ranks with his greatest work. It is timeless and definitely a highpoint in his career. Scott Yanow, author of ten books including The Jazz Singers, Trumpet Kings, Bebop, Jazz On Record 1917-76 and Jazz On Film
  1. Jitterbug Waltz
  2. I Thought About You
  3. Never Been in Love
  4. Little Girl Blue
  5. Stablemates
  6. As Time Goes By
  7. Born to Be Blue
  8. Be My Love
  9. Peace
  10. Peace Alt. Take
  11. Pecado
  12. Pecado Alt. Take
  13. The Very Thought of You
Atras da Porta Cover
  • Atras da Porta
  • Jazz, Latin
  • Rob McConnell And The Boss Brass
  • 03/28/2010
  • Atras da Porta
Liner Notes: 1. EASY TO LOVE (Cole Porter) 5:17 Soloists: Moe Koffman, Steve Wallace—Arranged by Rob McConnell 2. FLOWERS (Fernando Gelbard) 5:27 Soloist: Jimmy Dole—Arranged by Rob McConnell 3. JO JO’S DANCE (Fernando Gelbard) 5:02 Soloists: Rob McConnell, Ed Bickert—Arranged by Jorge Calandrelli 4. ATRAS DA PORTA (Francis Hime) 5:49 Soloist: Guido Basso—Arranged by Jorge Calandrelli 5. AMOR ATE O FIM (Gilberto Gil) 8:50 Soloists: Eugene Amaro, John MacLeod—Arranged by Rick Wilkins 6. AUTUMN IN NEW YORK (Vernon Duke) 7:14 Soloist: Jerry Toth—Arranged by Rob McConnell 7. DIDI (Fernando Gelbard) 4:59 Soloist: Moe Koffman—Arranged by Rob McConnell 8. BYE BYE BLUES (Bennett/Lown/Grey/Hamm) 6:34 Soloists: Rob McConnell, Eugene Amaro—Arranged by Rob McConnell CREDITS: Producer: Fernando Gelbard Recording Engineer: Phil Sheridan Co-Producer and Musical Advisor: Jorge Calandrelli Mixed by Rob McConnell, Jorge Calandrelli, Fernando Gelbard and Phil Sheridan Assistant: Steve Ibelshauser Recorded December 19-20, 1983 at McClear Place, Toronto, Canada Mixed December 21-22-23, 1983 at McClear Place, Toronto, Canada Mastering: Peter Norman, McClear Place, Toronto, Canada (1983) Remastering: Mark Vincent & Fernando Gelbard at Multi Media Music, Hollywood (2010) Cover Design: Bill Woodward for Woody Woodward Cover Photograpy (painting): Woody Woodward Cover Painting: by Aneff from Uruguay Digital Production: Fernando Gelbard (2010) (p) ©2010 LiquidJazz.com LTD (BVI) ROB MCCONNELL AND THE BOSS BRASS " ATRAS DA PORTA " This is an extraordinary album by a no less extraordinary orchestra. It represents the product of an international effort involving a Canadian composer and his orchestra, an Argentinian producer, and a repertoire composed of Brazilian songs and American standard tunes. The collaboration of Rob McConnell and Fernando Gelbard came about in a most unusual way. Active for many years in Argentina as a producer (and as a flutist and pianist), Gelbard came to the U.S. in 1976 and four years later, at the suggestion of a celebrated fellow Argentinean, the composer Lalo Schifrin, joined the Foundation for New American Music. Soon afterward he became a director and executive committee member of this organization, which presents the concerts by the New American Orchestra at the Los Angeles Music Center. McConnell recalls that he came into the picture when Gelbard and Jack Elliott, leader of the orchestra, were chatting at a post-concert party. “Fernando talked to Jack about me, told him how much he liked my orchestra, and Jack arranged to bring us together.” By this time, McConnell had begun to acquire a belated reputation south of the Canadian border. The orchestra was launched in Toronto in 1968 (McConnell, a native of London, Ontario, had spent the last 25 years of his life as a freelancer there). Despite enthusiastic reactions, the band remained a part-time occupation throughout the 1970s. “All of us have had other activities to keep us going,” Rob told me. “Several men, like Moe Koffman, are composers and lead their own groups, but when we have a booking for the orchestra, our personnel remains very steady.” Finally, in the fall of 1981, the first big break came with a deal to play at the Monterey Jazz Festival. Aside from a single break-in date in Upstate New York, this marked the first time the Boss Brass had ever been in the States as a unit. They followed it up with a videotaping session at Concerts by the Sea and a four-night stand at Carmelo’s. In January of 1984 they returned, this time for a stint at Donte’s and a couple of other gigs. That the orchestra is now well-known in California, but has yet to be heard in New York and most other American cities, is due in large part to the help it had from airplay on such jazz stations at KKGO in Los Angeles and KJAZ in San Francisco. After winning two Juno awards (the Canadian counterpart of the Grammys) and being nominated three times for a Grammy, the McConnell battalion finally hit gold in 1984, when its album “All in Good Time,” released in the U.S. on Dark Orchid Records, won the Best Big Band Grammy, up against such stiff competition as Count Basie. On the heels of this triumph, the band now presents what is beyond doubt one of its finest albums, and one that departs slightly from its routine style. However, despite the Latin accent in several selections, and the inclusion of two arrangements by Gelbard’s longtime friend Jorge Calandrelli, the essential characteristics—brilliantly orchestrated charts for the 22 men, originality in textures and tone colors, consistent invention by no fewer than nine soloists—all remain unimpaired and, in fact, reach new heights of achievement. “We had no problem at all relating to this material,” says McConnell. “In fact, it was a special pleasure to play Jorge’s two arrangements, and to do my own charts on two of Fernando’s compositions.” Prior to the session, Gelbard went to Toronto to hear the band play for a few nights at Bourbon Street, listen to a broad selection of tunes, and pick out those that seemed most suitable for the album. “Atras da Porta” (“Behind the Door”) is a triple triumph in its subtle interweaving of composition (by Francis Hime), Calandrelli’s ingenious arrangement, and the distinguished soloist, Guido Basso, the orchestra’s sole French-Canadian constituent. Note the subtle manner in which the band eases into double time. “Bye Bye Blues” is an antique pop song, vintage 1930, written by (and the radio theme song of) a pre-swing bandleader named Bert Lown. Rob McConnell is front and center here, playing the melody almost straight with a neat obbligato by pianist Jimmy Dale. The second chorus exemplifies the maestro’s always personal writing style. Following Eugene Amaro’s eloquent tenor, there is a brief doubled-up passage before Rob suddenly reprises the melody. (As a trombonist he is basically self-taught; he studied composing and arranging with the late Gordon Delamont.) “Didi” is an attractive original contributed by Gelbard, to which Rob added the magic of his penmanship. The flute soloist, Moe Koffman, is perhaps the best-known of McConnell’s men among U.S. audiences ever since “Swinging Shepherd Blues” on his own first LP became a hit in 1957. (Rob himself and guitarist Ed Bickert played on that date.) The crisp ending on this cut is typical of the band’s superb cohesion. Rob shows his deft touch again in a brilliant arrangement of “Autumn in New York.” The 1934 Vernon Duke standard is played entirely without a rhythm section throughout the first chorus, yet an implicit pulse is always present. Jerry Toth’s tone on alto sax is distinctive; he is derivative neither of the Hodges nor the Parker school. “Amor Ate o Fim” (“Love Until the End”) was arranged by tenor saxophonist Rick Wilkins, who retains the Brazilian spirit of Gilberto Gil’s melody, from the electric keyboard samba vamp (with Memo Acevedo supplying additional percussion rhythms) through the solos by Gene Amaro on flute and the poised, personal John MacLeod, all the way to the keyboard reprise. Hearing the band play this tune during its stay at Donte’s, I was impressed with the excitement generated by its Pan-American flavor, from Canada to the U.S. to Brazil. The Gelbard melody “Flowers” is tightly knit, the main strain all within the range of a fourth (from B-flat down to F the first time around). Highlights are a suspenseful rhythmless passage and Jimmy Dale’s foray on electric keyboard. Dale is another of the sidemen with numerous U.S. credits; at one time he was musical director on the Cher TV show. “Several years ago Guido, Moe and I were players on the show’s pilot,” Rob recalls. Some years later, Rob came back to Los Angeles for the premiere of his composition “Hello from the North,” performed by the New American Orchestra. “Jo Jo’s Dance,” played with a straight four feeling, gives Rob a chance to display the jazz aspect of his trombone personality. This cut is also notable for a contribution by Ed Bickert, long Canada’s premier guitarist and well-known through his recordings with Paul Desmond. Calandrelli’s arrangement of this Gelbard work shows he has a clear understanding of how to bring out the band’s unique essence. Cole Porter’s 1936 hit “Easy to Love,” taken at a brisk up tempo, is a vehicle for Koffman’s alto sax and for a two-chorus solo by Steve Wallace, who surprises us in the last 16 bars by reverting to a walking-bass style. A Terry Clarke drum break leads the way into the out chorus for this vibrant McConnell arrangement. Rob McConnell and the Boss Brass have risen, during the last few years, to a position of unique respect among fellow musicians on either side of the border. That the band has been able to travel in the U.S. at all is due at least partly to the friendly cooperation of the Canadian government, through its Department of External Affairs; also to the support of a group of enthusiastic businessmen in Toronto who helped get the first American visit under way. Given its size (there are not many 22-piece orchestras on the road nowadays), one can understand the logistic problems in establishing the band as a permanent, traveling unit. However, its phenomenal level of artistry, coupled with the Grammy and its attendant prestige, should at least enlarge the buying public for this and all future albums. We owe a special debt to Fernando Gelbard for his vital role in bringing to fruition this latest triumph in the Boss Brass’ distinguished career. --Leonard Feather ( 1985)
  1. Easy to Love
  2. Flowers
  3. Jo Jo's Dance
  4. Atras da Porta
  5. Amor Ate O Fim
  6. Autumn in New York
  7. Didi
  8. Bye Bye Blues
Frank Collett - Coney Island Cover
  • Frank Collett - Coney Island
  • Jazz
  • Various Artists
  • 04/03/2010
  • Frank Collett - Coney Island
Liner Notes: I. Your Face (Frank Collett) 4:21 2. The Way You Love Is (Frank Collett) 5:54 3. Lowdown (Frank Collett) 5:12 4. Sparkles (Fernando Gelbard , Frank Collett) 3:10 5. You Know How Much I Care (Frank Collett) 3:56 6. Portrait of Lynda (Frank Collett) 5:54 7. Nicholas Necklace (Fernando Gelbard) 5:23 8. 4/4 for Niles (Frank Collett) 3:50 9. Coney Island Frank Collett) 4:00 10. Nerves (Frank Collett) 3:04 II. Chuck Niles: A Candid Interview with Frank Collett (Chuck Niles , Frank Collett) 5:13 Frank Collett - piano Monty Budwig - bass Santo Savino - drums Jon Pall - guitar (3,5,8) Producer: Fernando Gelbard Director of Engineering: Phil Sheridan Recording Engineers: Phil Sheridan, Michael Boshears Associate Producer: Mitchell Glickman Recorded: December 15/ 16, 1986 at Sage & Sound Studios, Hollywood and July 7, 1987 at Dave Pell Digital Studios, Hollywood Re-mastering: Fernando Gelbard and Mark Vincent, Multi Media Music, Hollywood (2010) Album Design: Fernando Gelbard Coney Island Photos: Hugo Feliu (1986) Portrait Photography: Lynda Sparks (1986) (p) © 2010 LiquidJazz.com LTD (BVI) www.LiquidJazz.com Email: LiquidJazz@gmail.com FRANK COLLETT - CONEY ISLAND It was 1973 and Carmen McRae was performing in my home town, Buenos Aires. For the last twenty years, my friends and I held jam sessions at Carlos Tarsia's home every Wednesday and Sunday. One Wednesday, as I enter the music room, I hear some incredible players. Jamming with my friends are Frank Collett, Monty Budwig, Donald Bailey (Carmen McRae's trio). I join them with my flute, and Frank and I meet. I am very impressed with this piano player. He's got a touch of Wynton Kelly and Victor Feldman, but he is different with a swinging and tasteful harmonic style. We exchange hopeless phone numbers and ten years later, we bump into each other at a New American Orchestra party in Los Angeles. Since then, I've never let him go. Fernando Gelbard (1987) Just a few words of gratitude and appreciation to all the people involved in this project. First, my parents Guiseppe and Mary Taglieri, to whom this album is dedicated. Together they inspired me at an early age with the timeless beauty of music. To Monty Budwig, with whom I've been playing together for many years. I treasure the time we spent recording two albums with the great Shelly Manne. To the drummer in my present trio, Santo Savino, whose natural propulsion makes you want to play. To Fernando Gelbard, my many, many thanks and gratitude for opening this door for me. After we finished the Sam Most album, "Any Time, Any Season" also produced by Fernando, we spoke about this project -all originals with one co written by Fernando and myself. "Sparkles." Working with Fernando is a joy. He listens and supports your ideas. then he contributes his. Fernando's flute and piano playing have given him ears that are in tune as well. To Phil Sheridan, who achieved the mix on the trio exactly as I heard it. He is the consummate engineer. And to Lynda, who has been a real inspiration through many years, my deepest love and affection. I Love You All ! Frank Collett (1987)
  1. Your Face <span class="various">by Frank Collett , Monty Budwig , Santo Savino</span>
  2. The Way You Love Is Real <span class="various">by Frank Collett , Monty Budwig , Santo Savino</span>
  3. Lowdown <span class="various">by Frank Collett , Monty Budwig , Santo Savino , Jon Pall</span>
  4. Sparkles <span class="various">by Frank Collett , Monty Budwig , Santo Savino</span>
  5. You Know How Much I Care <span class="various">by Frank Collett , Monty Budwig , Santo Savino , Jon Pall</span>
  6. Portrait of Lynda <span class="various">by Frank Collett , Monty Budwig , Santo Savino</span>
  7. Nicholas Necklace <span class="various">by Frank Collett , Monty Budwig , Santo Savino</span>
  8. Four Four for Niles <span class="various">by Frank Collett , Monty Budwig , Santo Savino , Jon Pall</span>
  9. Coney Island <span class="various">by Frank Collett , Monty Budwig , Santo Savino</span>
  10. Nerves <span class="various">by Frank Collett , Monty Budwig , Santo Savino</span>
  11. Chuck Niles : A Candid Interview With Frank Collett... <span class="various">by Chuck Niles , Frank Collett</span>
Ciclo (feat. Santiago Giacobbe, Fernando Gelbard, Rodolfo Alchourron, Alfredo Wulff, Jorge Gonzalez & Miky Lerman) Cover
  • Ciclo (feat. Santiago Giacobbe, Fernando Gelbard, Rodolfo Alchourron, Alfredo Wulff, Jorge Gonzalez & Miky Lerman)
  • Jazz, Jazz
  • Agrupacion Nuevo Jazz
  • 04/22/2010
  • Ciclo (feat. Santiago Giacobbe, Fernando Gelbard, Rodolfo Alchourron, Alfredo Wulff, Jorge Gonzalez & Miky Lerman)
Liner Notes:
  1. Ciclo (feat. Santiago Giacobbe, Fernando Gelbard, Rodolfo Alchourron, Alfred...
Didi (Original Analog Master, Bonus Tracks) Cover
  • Didi (Original Analog Master, Bonus Tracks)
  • Jazz, World
  • Fernando Gelbard
  • 10/18/2010
  • Didi (Original Analog Master, Bonus Tracks)
Liner Notes: 1. DIDI (HOLA DIDI) 8:33 2. EL SENOR MAYOR 9:00 3. MOJO 1 2:00 4. ALEVACOLARIEA 5:49 5. HAVANA NIGHTS 3:47 6. FLOWERS (SOMBRERO DE FLORES) 7:25 7. CHAU AMBROSIO 5:37 8. ALEVACOLARIEA (ALTERNATE MIX) 4:00 All tunes composed by Fernando Gelbard (c) 1974 and (c) 2010. Gelbard Publishing (ASCAP) Credits: Musicians: 1. DIDI (HOLA DIDI) Fernando Gelbard (Fender Rhodes, Minimoog), Miguel "Chino Rossi" (Percussion), Ruben Rada (Percussion), Ricardo Salas (Bass) 2. EL SENOR MAYOR Fernando Gelbard (Fender Rhodes with Ring Modulator and Wawa), Horacio "Chivo" Borraro (Tenor sax), Norberto Minichilo (Drums), Miguel "Chino" Rossi (Percussion), Ruben Rada (Percussion) 3. MOJO 1 Fernando Gelbard (Minimoog) 4. ALEVACOLARIEA Fernando Gelbard (Fender Rhodes), Ruben Rada (Vocalese, percussion), Horacio "Chivo" Borraro (Percussion), Miguel Chino Rossi (Percussion, cuica) 5. HAVANA NIGHTS Fernando Gelbard (Minimoog, Fender Rhodes) 6. FLOWERS (SOMBRERO DE FLORES) Fernando Gelbard (Fender Rhodes, Minimoog), Miguel "Chino" Rossi (Percussion), Ruben Rada (Percussion), Ricardo Salas (Bass) 7. CHAU AMBROSIO Fernando Gelbard (Fender Rhodes), Horacio "Chivo" Borraro (Tenor sax), Miguel "Chino" Rossi (Percussion), Ruben Rada (Percussion) 8. ALEVACOLARIEA (ALTERNATE MIX) Fernando Gelbard (Fender Rhodes), Ruben Rada (Vocalese, percussion), Horacio "Chivo" Borraro (Percussion), Miguel Chino Rossi (Percussion, cuica) Producer : Fernando Gelbard (1974) Redondel Label executives (original 1974 release) : Carlos Mayon and Adrian Fernandez Recording Engineer: Jorge Da Silva (1974) Mixing: Jorge Da Silva and Fernando Gelbard (1974) Recorded and mixed during August 1974 at Music Hall Studios, Buenos Aires, Argentina Transfer from analog 1/4" Dolby A tape to digital : Carlos Piriz, Estudios Moebio, Buenos Aires (2010) Revox A 77 1/2 track analog recorder courtesy of Eduardo Schejtman (2010) Digital processing : Mark Vincent, Multi Media Music, Hollywood, California (2010) Mastering for digital release: Fernando Gelbard (2010) Cover photo: Carlos Fadigati (1974) Cover design: based on 1974's cover artwork: Fernando Gelbard (2010) Original vinyl release by Redondel Records, Argentina, December 14, 1974 Also released by Whatmusic. com (UK) licensed from 2002 to 2009 by Fernando Gelbard Liner notes use courtesy of Charlie Leach at Whatmusic.com (p) (c) 1974 (p) (c) 2010 Fernando Gelbard Liner Notes: When 'Didi' was recorded in Buenos Aires during August 1974, five Argentineans and one Uruguayan landed at Music Hall recording studios. Their leader was Fernando Gelbard, an Argentinean pianist, flautist, composer and record producer. 1974 was a time when neither synthesizers (like the Moog) nor Fender Rhodes pianos were usual in Buenos Aires. Nevertheless, Fernando Gelbard chose to forgo his acoustic instruments in making 'Didi', thus becoming the first musician in Argentina to make a jazz record exclusively on the new electronic instruments. This is a pioneering project in more than one way. Through the use, for instance, of two percussionists in all the tunes - with the exception of two pieces recorded one with Moog only and one with Moog and Fender Rhodes. I don't think many Argentinean jazz musicians of the time relied so much on electronic instruments and percussion. There is also a saxophone player on three of the tunes and there is a drummer in two tracks. Gelbard's work of 1974, with its all-pervading percussion and rhythms from Latin America or, better, Latin Afro-America, would be labeled today world music or world jazz. World jazz or whatever you call it, it is nonetheless a jazz work firmly rooted in be-bop and post-bop with a strong electronic and Latin jazz side to it. Latin? What kind of Latin exactly? Two bossa nova tunes in it: 'Didi', with its catchy melodic line, and 'Flowers'. Bossa they are, but the many rhythms played and/or implied by the percussionists give it a very special flavour: you've seldom heard that special kind of bossa. The way the two percussionists intertwine creates that particular flavour and colour. One of them, Ruben Rada, from Uruguay, playing mostly congas here, was later to gain wide popularity through his very personal, lively and modern version of the candombe, an Uruguayan Black mixture of religion, traditions, dance and music. Here he gives a beautiful example of his approach on 'Alevacolariea'. His chanting at the beginning and the end of the piece is something you find all over the Americas in the afro-american traditions. But your ear will convince you of his original approach to it. The dialogue between the two percussionists, throughout the album, will tell you that the other one, Miguel 'Chino' Rossi, is a perfect match for Rada. The precise bass lines on this cut were overdubbed by Gelbard on the Moog, and the Fender Rhodes and tenor sax solos (Gelbard & Borraro) add a pure virtuoso be-bop flavour to this bouillabaise of sounds. Unexpected flavours and colours, that's what 'Didi' is about. A master colourist, Duke Ellington, said of one of his compositions with "colour" in its title: "It's not a colour, it is a hint of a tint." Hints of tints, hues, colours in this record owe a lot to the percussionists, but not only to them. There's also the delicate balance between the electronic instruments used by Gelbard (Fender Rhodes piano, Moog synthesizer, Wa-Wa and Ring Modulator) and the percussionists and the bass player (and in two pieces, the drummer too), a mixing balance achieved through hard and meticulous work when it came to editing the songs in the studio. Like the tenor saxophone solo in 'El Señor mayor' ('The Elder One'): different takes are combined so that it sounds as though three saxophones were playing simultaneously. In 'Chau, Ambrosio' ('Bye, Ambrosio'), the most conventional jazz number in the album, the tenor's blowing is recorded straight ahead. Horacio Borraro's tenor solos provide a short introduction to the jazz creativeness of one of the founding fathers of modern jazz in Argentina, who is also an architect, painter and slang creator. Pity no recording, as far as I know, ever caught the beauty of his sense of humour and his very personal slang. The bass player Ricardo Salas has always ranked among the best in Argentina and Norberto Minichilo, the drummer, has been for years consistently proving his exceptional musicianship. And last but by no means least, Fernando Gelbard conceived the whole thing. Besides his contributions as the composer, Fender Rhodes pianist and Moogist in the band, he's a soloist to listen to. Don't miss the pleasure. Let me recommend you listen to 'Mojo Uno', recorded at his home in Buenos Aires by just himself on the Moog. Or his guitar-like second Moog solo on 'Flowers'. By then you would be probably listening to this album for the second or third time and you'd be telling friends and acquaintances: "Hey, have you heard this 1974 record made in Argentina? We've been missing something!" Notes from 2010: Those were the liner notes written for the Whatmusic.com release in 2002, which was based on a master from of a denoised Argentinean release LP. Fernando found in 2010 the original analog master 1/4" tape from 1974. With its original Dolby A encoding and resting in Buenos Aires, it would have been risky to transport it overseas. Getting a 1/4" recorder was also not easy. Finally musician and buddy Eduardo Shejtman lent Fernando his Revox A77 and Carlos Piriz at Estudios Moebio using his vintage original Dolby A decoder, recovered this master, which makes this album sound better than any previous release. Two bonus tracks were found: "Havana Nights, composed by Fernando Gelbard and recorded with the Moog and the Fender Rhodes and a shorter version of "Alevacolariea" which are included in this release. Norberto Gimelfarb Yverdon, Switzerland, February 2002 / October 2010 (c) 1974 & (c) 2010 Fernando Gelbard
  1. Didi (Hola Didi)
  2. El Senor Mayor
  3. Mojo 1
  4. Alevacolariea
  5. Havana Nights
  6. Flowers (Sombrero De Flores)...
  7. Chau Ambrosio
  8. Alevacolariea (Alternate Mix)...
Jorge Calandrelli Vintage Strings and Brass Cover
  • Jorge Calandrelli Vintage Strings and Brass
  • Jazz, Instrumental
  • Various Artists
  • 12/14/2010
  • Jorge Calandrelli Vintage Strings and Brass
Liner Notes:
  1. My Funny Valentine <span class="various">by Jorge Calandrelli Arranger and Strings with Sam Most 1986</span>
  2. Espacial <span class="various">by Jorge Calandrelli Dectet 1969</span>
  3. Days of Wine and Roses <span class="various">by Jorge Calandrelli Arranger and Strings with Sam Most 1986</span>
  4. Atras da Porta <span class="various">by Jorge Calandrelli Arranger with The Boss Brass 1983</span>
  5. Any Time Any Season <span class="various">by Jorge Calandrelli Arranger and Strings with Sam Most 1986</span>
  6. Jo Jo's Dance <span class="various">by Jorge Calandrelli Arranger with The Boss Brass 1983</span>
  7. From My Sax With Love <span class="various">by Jorge Calandrelli Arranger and Strings with Chivo Borraro 1973</span>
Alevacolariea Cover
  • Alevacolariea
  • World, Jazz
  • Fernando Gelbard
  • 09/28/2012
  • Alevacolariea
Liner Notes: ALEVACOLARIEA In August 1974 Buenos Aires was full of music. It was still enjoying a "Belle Epoque" in which the city was a nest of interesting people. I was among other things, a busy musician. A local record label, Discos Redondel, offered me to finance and release an album. I would decide the entire production. The album was recorded and released as a vinyl LP, "Didi, and has circulated ever since. One of the tunes was completely different to all my previous music, "Alevacolariea", and was an inspiration created at the studio. We were set up for 8 tracks, a luxury in these days. I had been experimenting with recordings in layers, starting with one or two instruments and then adding others. I wrote a melodic line. I had with me some of the best: Chivo Borraro on tenor sax, Ruben Rada and Chino Rossi also in percussion. I started with a bass line with the Fender Rhodes together with Rada in "Quinto" (An Afro-Uruguayan drum) and Chino Rossi in Brazilian cuica. I got the basic rhythm base. No click track was used and no sampling either, it wasn't invented yet! . Then I recorded the Fender Rhodes chords and solo, together with Rada and Chino Rossi in other drums and percussion accessories. Finally, I recorded Rada's voice with my melody and his Afro word "Alevacolariea" and Chivo Borraro's solo. The whole album was released on December 14 1974. It sold well and had good airplay. In 1976 I left Argentina for the USA and forgot about the album. In the 90's the song "Alevacolariea" took a life of its own. It was pirated, sampled, and somehow distributed illegally in the new miraculous dimension: the Internet. I always thought that perhaps piracy was a form of flattery since marauders only take good music, not necessarily from my taste's point of view, but good for the majority. I licensed the entire album to my friends at Whatmusic (London) and that was up to this date, the only legal release of the album besides the Argentinean vinyl. Last December (2009) I read a mysterious message in YouTube. Someone wanted Alevacolariea badly. I wrote back and found that Karine Begue has been looking for this tune for years. Although the tune was all over the place mostly in hiding, this lady somehow hasn't found it. I sent her a complimentary mp3. This encounter with a fan, inspired me to re-develop Alevacolariea...I had already recorded a version with more solos. I added two dance versions and one flute solo version. They will all come out when I release Alevacolariea "The Album" or whichever name I can think of. The message from one fan, triggered my creative endorphins and this single with the original analog version of Alevacolariea is being released. The sound is much better than any other of the circulating versions. Whatmusic used a denoised a new Argentinean LP. The marauders used old noisy worn out Argentinean released LP's. I used the original analog track ! May chaos turn into clarity the same way as a storm clears and the Sun shines. Fernando Gelbard, April 2010 credits Released: December 14, 1974 Fernando Gelbard : Fender Rhodes Piano Chivo Borraro :Tenor Sax Ruben Rada: Percussion and Vocalese Chino Rossi: Percussion and Cuica Produced by Fernando Gelbard Recorded at Music Hall Studios, Buenos Aires, August 1974 Recording Engineer: Jorge Da Silva Mixing : Jorge Da Silva, Fernando Gelbard Transfer from the original analog Dolby master to digital: Carlos Piriz Mastering: Mark Vincent and Fernando Gelbard , Multi Media Music, Hollywood (2010) Cover design: Fernando Gelbard (2012) Self portrait photo from 1974: Fernando Gelbard Art consultant (2012): Karine Begue (c) 1974/2012 Fernando Gelbard
  1. Alevacolariea
Solo Flute Songbook Cover
  • Solo Flute Songbook
  • Jazz, Jazz
  • Sam Most
  • 07/13/2013
  • Solo Flute Songbook
  1. The Great Unknown
  2. Farmisht Fardrayt Un Farblundget...
  3. Once It Didn't Matter
  4. I Got It
  5. Same Old Dream
  6. Understand Me
  7. With Eyes Unable to See
  8. All at Once I Lost My Breath...
  9. I Won't Forget
  10. That Old Melody
  11. Nights Beyond Forgetting
  12. The Memory of Your Kiss
  13. You Took My Heart
  14. It Happened to Me
  15. Latin Feel Blues
  16. While I'm Waiting Here
  17. Namaste
  18. Why Should We Spend Money
  19. Things You Say and Do
  20. Now and Forever
Bronca Buenos Aires 2013 Cover
  • Bronca Buenos Aires 2013
  • Jazz, World
  • Jorge Lopez Ruiz
  • 08/24/2013
  • Bronca Buenos Aires 2013
  1. La Ville Vide
  2. Récits
  3. Amour Buenos Aires
  4. Rogne Buenos Aires
  5. The Empty City
  6. Tales
  7. Love Buenos Aires
  8. Anger Buenos Aires
  9. La Ciudad Vacia
  10. Relatos
  11. Amor Buenos Aires
  12. Bronca Buenos Aires
  13. La Ciudad Vacia (Instrumental Version)...
  14. Relatos (Instrumental Version)...
  15. Amor Buenos Aires (Instrumental Version)...
  16. Bronca Buenos Aires (Instrumental Version)...
  17. Comentarios
LiquidJazz Sweet Pastries Cover
  • LiquidJazz Sweet Pastries
  • Jazz, World
  • Various Artists
  • 04/01/2014
  • LiquidJazz Sweet Pastries
  1. Cancion De Cuna <span class="various">by Chivo Borraro</span>
  2. Alevacolariea Karine <span class="various">by Fernando Gelbard</span>
  3. Alpha IV <span class="various">by Jorge Calandrelli</span>
  4. I Can't Get Started <span class="various">by Fernando Gelbard</span>
  5. Namaste <span class="various">by Sam Most</span>
  6. Piccolo Blues <span class="various">by Fernando Gelbard</span>
  7. Infive <span class="various">by Pat Senatore</span>
  8. Flowers <span class="various">by Larry Koonse</span>
  9. Sparkles <span class="various">by Frank Collett</span>
  10. Infive <span class="various">by Larry Koonse</span>
  11. The Great Unknown <span class="various">by Sam Most</span>
  12. Havana Nights <span class="various">by Fernando Gelbard</span>
Gustavo Kerestezachi 1961 Cover
  • Gustavo Kerestezachi 1961
  • Jazz, Jazz
  • Various Artists
  • 03/11/2015
  • Gustavo Kerestezachi 1961
  1. Sister Sadie <span class="various">by Gustavo Kerestezachi</span>
  2. Paul's Pal <span class="various">by Gustavo Kerestezachi</span>
  3. Moanin' <span class="various">by Gustavo Kerestezachi</span>
  4. On Green Dolphin Street <span class="various">by Gustavo Kerestezachi</span>
  5. Cherokee <span class="various">by Gustavo Kerestezachi</span>
Phil Woods & the Boss Brass Cover
  • Phil Woods & the Boss Brass
  • Jazz, Jazz
  • Phil Woods, Rob McConnell & The Boss Brass
  • 10/22/2015
  • Phil Woods & the Boss Brass
  1. Out of Nowhere
  2. Quintessence
  3. Traditional Piece
  4. Stereo Blue