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Artist Profile

Take Two Records

Take Two Records

Take Two Records preserves and shares the popular music of our past by releasing high quality, digital restorations of recordings from the last Century. Our catalog specializes in popular songs written during the “golden age” of Tin Pan Alley and performed by top recording artists from 1905 to 1945.

Songs of World War I Cover
  • Songs of World War I
  • Pop, Jazz
  • Various Artists
  • 05/01/2011
  • Songs of World War I
Liner Notes: According to one authority, some 36,000 patriotic and war songs were written in America during the 52 months of that WWI. A mere 40 of them are included in this compilation. Some became international hits and are still familiar to many, including It's A Long Way To Tipperary, and Over There, and Oh! How I Hate To Get Up In The Morning. Probably no other major conflict has been so celebrated in song. However, the war itself stood in stark contrast to the many appealing tunes it inspired. In addition to the sheer size of this conflict, the introduction of new weapons of mass destruction ensured high causalities. Many who survived the hazards of trench warfare and hand-to-hand combat were taken by the flu epidemic. By Armistice, nearly a whole generation of young men were injured or lost to some countries. These selections comment on a variety of wartime experiences such as leaving for war Goodbye Broadway, Hello France, the sadness of parting Till We Meet Again, a child longing for a father Just A Baby's Prayer At Twilight and returning home I've Got My Captain Working For Me Now. But a more sober perspective is provided in My Dream Of The Big Parade recorded some years after the Armistice.
  1. It's A Long Long Way To Tipperary... <span class="various">by The American Quartet</span>
  2. Keep The Home Fires Burning... <span class="various">by John Mc Cormack</span>
  3. Madelon <span class="various">by Amparito Farrar</span>
  4. There's A Long, Long Trail... <span class="various">by John Mc Cormack</span>
  5. Roses Of Picardy <span class="various">by John Mc Cormack</span>
  6. Pack Up Your Troubles In Your Old Kit Bag... <span class="various">by Reinald Werrenrath</span>
  7. I Didn't Raise My Boy To Be A Soldier... <span class="various">by Morton Harvey</span>
  8. It's Time For Every Boy To Be A Soldier... <span class="various">by Charles H. Hart</span>
  9. Till The Clouds Roll By <span class="various">by Anna Wheaton & James Harrod</span>
  10. Oh Johnny, Oh Johnny Oh! <span class="various">by The American Quartet</span>
  11. I'm Always Chasing Rainbows... <span class="various">by Charles Harrison</span>
  12. Will You Remember <span class="various">by Alice Green & Raymond Dixon</span>
  13. Over There <span class="various">by Nora Bayes</span>
  14. Goodbye Broadway, Hello France... <span class="various">by The American Quartet</span>
  15. When Alexander Takes His Ragtime Band To France When Alexander Takes His Rag... <span class="various">by Marion Harris</span>
  16. K-K-K-Katy <span class="various">by Billy Murray</span>
  17. When I Send You A Picture Of Berlin... <span class="various">by Arthur Fields And The Peerless Quartet</span>
  18. Au Revoir But Not Goodbye Soldier Boy... <span class="various">by The Peerless Quartet</span>
  19. Till We Meet Again <span class="various">by Charles Hart And Lewis James</span>
  20. Smiles <span class="various">by Lambert Murphy</span>
  21. Poor Butterfly <span class="various">by Fritz Kreisler</span>
  22. Memories <span class="various">by Paul Reimers</span>
  23. Just A Baby`s Prayer At Twilight... <span class="various">by Henry Burr</span>
  24. Hello Central Give Me No Man`s Land... <span class="various">by Al Jolson</span>
  25. Good Morning, Mr. Zip-Zip-Zip... <span class="various">by Arthur Fields And The Peerless Quartet</span>
  26. Oh! How I Hate To Get Up In The Morning... <span class="various">by Arthur Fields</span>
  27. I Don't Want To Get Well <span class="various">by Van And Schenck</span>
  28. We`ll Do Our Share (While You`re Over There)... <span class="various">by The Peerless Quartet</span>
  29. I`m Gonna Pin My Medal On The Girl I Left Behind... <span class="various">by The Peerless Quartet</span>
  30. Sister Susie`s Sewing Shirts For Soldiers... <span class="various">by Billy Murray</span>
  31. The Caissons Go Rolling Along (U. S. Field Artillery March)... <span class="various">by John Philip Sousa</span>
  32. The Further It Is From Tipperary... <span class="various">by Billy Murray</span>
  33. The Laddies Who Fought And Won... <span class="various">by Harry Lauder</span>
  34. We Don't Want The Bacon (What We Want Is A Piece Of The Rhine)... <span class="various">by The Peerless Quartet</span>
  35. The Yanks Started Yankin` <span class="various">by Arthur Fields</span>
  36. Let The Rest Of The World Go By... <span class="various">by Elizabeth Spencer And Charles Hart</span>
  37. I`ve Got My Captain Working For Me Now... <span class="various">by Al Jolson</span>
  38. How 'ya Gonna Keep 'em Down On The Farm (After They've Seen Paree?)... <span class="various">by Arthur Fields</span>
  39. My Buddy <span class="various">by Henry Burr</span>
  40. My Dream Of The Big Parade... <span class="various">by The Peerless Quartet With Billy Murray</span>
Memories of Old Broadway Cover
  • Memories of Old Broadway
  • Jazz
  • Various Artists
  • 06/20/2011
  • Memories of Old Broadway
Liner Notes: This collection offers samples of 60 selections from major Broadway Musicals and Revues covering a 30-year period from 1904 to 1934. All numbers are from vintage recordings made at the time of the musical—not later revivals. Our purpose is to give today's listener a clear sense of changes in compositions, arrangements and vocal styles in musical theatre over this interesting period—a span that covers the transition of sounds from ragtime to jazz and early swing. The enduring show business classic Give My Regards To Broadway recorded in 1905 opens this set. This song was originally performed by George M. Cohan in Little Johnny Jones, but was not recorded by him so a contemporary performance by Samuel H. Rous is used instead. However, several numbers are performed by the artist who introduced them in the original shows such as I'm Always Chasing Rainbows by Harry Fox in Oh, Look!, Birth Of The Blues by Harry Richman from George White's Scandals Of 1926, Doin' The New Low-Down, by Bill "Bojangles" Robinson from Lew Leslie's Blackbirds Of 1928, Heat Wave, by Ethel Waters in As Thousands Cheer and You're The Top by Ethel Merman in Anything Goes. In addition there are actual performances by composers Victor Herbert, Rudolph Friml, George Gershwin and Cole Porter.
  1. Give My Regards To Broadway... <span class="various">by Samuel H. Rous</span>
  2. Yankee Doodle Boy <span class="various">by Billy Murray</span>
  3. You're A Grand Old Flag <span class="various">by Billy Murray</span>
  4. Ah! Sweet Mystery Of Life <span class="various">by Victor Herbert</span>
  5. Beautiful Lady <span class="various">by Lucy Isabelle Marsh</span>
  6. Sister Susie's Sewing Shirts For Soldiers... <span class="various">by Al Jolson</span>
  7. Hello, Frisco, Hello <span class="various">by Olive Kline & Reinald Werrenrath</span>
  8. I'll Say She Does <span class="various">by Al Jolson</span>
  9. I'm Always Chasing Rainbows... <span class="various">by Harry Fox</span>
  10. A Pretty Girl Is Like A Melody... <span class="various">by John Steel</span>
  11. Rose Of Washington Square <span class="various">by Billy Murray</span>
  12. A Kiss In The Dark <span class="various">by Olive Kline</span>
  13. Old Fashioned Love <span class="various">by Noble Sissle & Eubie Blake</span>
  14. Rose-Marie <span class="various">by John Mc Cormack</span>
  15. Tea For Two <span class="various">by Helen Clark & Lewis James</span>
  16. Song Of The Vagabonds <span class="various">by Rudolf Friml</span>
  17. Who? <span class="various">by George Olsen</span>
  18. A Cup Of Coffee, A Sandwich, And You... <span class="various">by Helen Clark & Franklyn Baur</span>
  19. Birth Of The Blues <span class="various">by Harry Richman</span>
  20. Play Gypsies, Dance Gypsies... <span class="various">by Artists Ensemble</span>
  21. Do, Do, Do <span class="various">by George Gershwin</span>
  22. Lily <span class="various">by Ted Lewis</span>
  23. Sometimes I'm Happy <span class="various">by Vaughn De Leath</span>
  24. Did You Mean It? <span class="various">by Lee Morse</span>
  25. Where Have You Been All My Life?... <span class="various">by Nat Shilkret</span>
  26. The Best Things In Life Are Free... <span class="various">by George Olsen</span>
  27. My Heart Stood Still <span class="various">by Jessie Matthews</span>
  28. Thou Swell <span class="various">by Herbert Gordon</span>
  29. Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man <span class="various">by Helen Morgan</span>
  30. You Took Advantage Of Me <span class="various">by Vaughn De Leath & Irving Kaufman</span>
  31. Doin' The New Low-Down <span class="various">by Bill Robinson & Irving Mills</span>
  32. I Must Have That Man <span class="various">by Adelaide Hall</span>
  33. I'm On The Crest Of A Wave... <span class="various">by Harry Richman</span>
  34. Lover, Come Back To Me <span class="various">by Evelyn Herbert</span>
  35. Stout Hearted Men <span class="various">by Perry Ascam</span>
  36. Let's Misbehave <span class="various">by Irene Bordoni</span>
  37. Watching The Clouds Roll By... <span class="various">by William F. Wirges</span>
  38. Until You Get Somebody Else... <span class="various">by George Olsen</span>
  39. Button Up Your Overcoat <span class="various">by Zelma O`Neal</span>
  40. Liza <span class="various">by Al Jolson</span>
  41. I May Be Wrong (But I Think You're Wonderful)... <span class="various">by High Hatters</span>
  42. Don't Ever Leave Me <span class="various">by Helen Morgan</span>
  43. Great Day <span class="various">by Roger Wolfe Kahn</span>
  44. You Do Something To Me <span class="various">by Chick Endor</span>
  45. Exactly Like You <span class="various">by Harry Richman</span>
  46. Thank Your Father <span class="various">by Al Goodman</span>
  47. Fine And Dandy <span class="various">by Dorsey Brothers</span>
  48. I Got Rhythm <span class="various">by Kate Smith</span>
  49. Embraceable You <span class="various">by Arden & Ohman</span>
  50. Something To Remember You By... <span class="various">by Libby Holman</span>
  51. Love For Sale <span class="various">by Fred Waring's Pennsylvanians</span>
  52. You Said It <span class="various">by Red Nichols & Harold Arlen</span>
  53. White Heat <span class="various">by Fred Astaire</span>
  54. Ooh! That Kiss <span class="various">by Arden & Ohman</span>
  55. Of Thee I Sing <span class="various">by Knickerbockers</span>
  56. Soft Lights And Sweet Music... <span class="various">by Fred Waring's Pennsylvanians</span>
  57. I've Told Ev'ry Little Star... <span class="various">by Mary Ellis</span>
  58. Heat Wave <span class="various">by Ethel Waters</span>
  59. Anything Goes <span class="various">by Cole Porter</span>
  60. You're The Top <span class="various">by Ethel Merman</span>
Pioneers of the Theatre Organ Cover
  • Pioneers of the Theatre Organ
  • Instrumental
  • Various Artists
  • 06/20/2011
  • Pioneers of the Theatre Organ
Liner Notes: The theatre organ was the brainchild of a brilliant innovator named Robert Hope-Jones who, with the Wurlitzer Company, was able to modify the sound a traditional church organ into one that suggested the sound of a modern orchestra. They were originally used in silent movie houses to accompany films and became a concert instrument with the onset of sound films. Jesse Crawford became the most innovative organist of his time and a popular recording artist. Twenty selections in this set are a tribute to him. When Day Is Done, I'd Love To Call You My Sweetheart (with orchestra) demonstrate his style. Lew White who played at the 6000-seat Roxy Theatre in New York. What Is This Thing Called Love is an early recording by him. Eddie Dunstedter played many movie houses and acquired a national recognition from his radio broadcasts. Dick Leibert, a remarkable musician, was the chief organist at the renowned Radio City Music Hall for 40 years. His interpretation of perennial favorite Star Dust is included here. Two British giants of the theatre organ complete this collection. Choo Choo shows the considerable skills of Reginald Foort and I Hate Myself attests to Sidney Torch's talent as an organist.
  1. Amapola <span class="various">by Jesse Crawford</span>
  2. When Day Is Done <span class="various">by Jesse Crawford</span>
  3. Roses Of Picardy <span class="various">by Jesse Crawford</span>
  4. I'd Love To Call You My Sweetheart... <span class="various">by Jesse Crawford</span>
  5. What Are You Waiting For? Mary... <span class="various">by Jesse Crawford</span>
  6. High Hat <span class="various">by Jesse Crawford</span>
  7. Ten Little Miles From Town... <span class="various">by Jesse Crawford</span>
  8. You're The Cream In My Coffee... <span class="various">by Jesse Crawford</span>
  9. Maybe <span class="various">by Jesse Crawford</span>
  10. It Happened In Monterey <span class="various">by Jesse Crawford</span>
  11. Cuban Love Song <span class="various">by Jesse Crawford</span>
  12. I'll Get By <span class="various">by Jesse Crawford</span>
  13. Tip-Toe Thru' The Tulips With Me... <span class="various">by Jesse Crawford</span>
  14. Gypsy Love Song <span class="various">by Jesse Crawford</span>
  15. She's A New Kind Of Old Fashioned Girl... <span class="various">by Jesse Crawford</span>
  16. L'amour, Toujours, L'amour... <span class="various">by Jesse Crawford</span>
  17. I Love To Hear You Singing... <span class="various">by Jesse Crawford</span>
  18. My Love Song <span class="various">by Jesse Crawford</span>
  19. A Kiss In The Dark <span class="various">by Jesse & Helen Crawford</span>
  20. Stein Song <span class="various">by Jesse Crawford</span>
  21. Girl Of My Dreams <span class="various">by Eddie Dunstedter</span>
  22. If I Had You <span class="various">by Eddie Dunstedter</span>
  23. Cirbiribin <span class="various">by Eddie Dunstedter</span>
  24. Sweethearts On Parade <span class="various">by Lew White</span>
  25. I Get The Blues When It Rains... <span class="various">by Lew White</span>
  26. What Is This Thing Called Love?... <span class="various">by Lew White</span>
  27. Dream Kisses <span class="various">by Milton Charles</span>
  28. The Spell Of The Blues <span class="various">by Milton Charles</span>
  29. Angela Mia <span class="various">by Emil Velazco</span>
  30. It Made You Happy When You Made Me Cry... <span class="various">by Harold L. Reider</span>
  31. My Blue Heaven <span class="various">by Sigmund Krumgold</span>
  32. Thou Swell <span class="various">by Fats Waller</span>
  33. Persian Rug <span class="various">by Fats Waller</span>
  34. Smoke Gets In Your Eyes <span class="various">by Dick Liebert</span>
  35. Star Dust <span class="various">by Dick Leibert</span>
  36. Choo Choo <span class="various">by Reginald Foort</span>
  37. Memories Of You <span class="various">by Reginald Foort</span>
  38. Estudiantina <span class="various">by Reginald Dixon</span>
  39. I Hate Myself (For Being So Mean To You)... <span class="various">by Sidney Torch</span>
  40. Love In Bloom <span class="various">by Sidney Torch</span>
Emergence of a Legend Cover
  • Emergence of a Legend
  • Pop
  • Kate Smith
  • 06/20/2011
  • Emergence of a Legend
Liner Notes: Kathryn Elizabeth Smith was born in Greenville, Virginia in 1907. By the 1940s and '50s Kate was among the best-known and highly regarded personalities in the nation. When she introduced the rousing Irving Berlin song "God Bless America" in a 1938 broadcast it became an instant hit and close to a second national anthem. In September of 1943 Kate launched an 18-hour radio marathon to sell war bonds. It met with such phenomenal success that a classic study on the subject of mass persuasion was conducted to determine why she had such an impact. Throughout the trying years of World War II, Kate's comforting presence on radio made her an iconic figure. Blessed with a great natural voice, Kate Smith made her first record in 1926. Her career blossomed in the 1930s when she emerged as a popular recording artist and radio personality with the support of her manager Ted Collins. It was during this decade that she made a remarkable transition from popular artist to show business legend. This album covers that musical journey. Provided here are many excellent selections from that period in her recording career including Maybe It's Love, When The Moon Comes Over The Mountain (her theme song) and Twenty Million People, featured in her 1933 film Hello Everybody.
  1. Maybe It's Love
  2. You'll Never Know Sweetheart...
  3. Here Comes The Sun
  4. Now's The Time
  5. You Didn't Have To Tell Me...
  6. Makin Faces At The Man In The Moon...
  7. If I Have To Go On Without You...
  8. When The Moon Comes Over The Mountain...
  9. You Call It Madness
  10. River, Stay 'way From My Door...
  11. Snuggled On Your Shoulder
  12. Love, You Funny Thing
  13. (In The Gloaming) By The Fireside...
  14. Twenty Million People
  15. My Queen Of Lullaby Land
  16. The Continental
  17. There's A Gold Mine In The Sky...
  18. Bei Mir Bist Du Schoen
  19. It's Never Too Late
  20. I Cried For You
Goodnight My Love Cover
  • Goodnight My Love
  • Pop
  • Ruth Etting
  • 06/20/2011
  • Goodnight My Love
Liner Notes: In the early 1920s Ruth Etting began her show business career as a local nightclub singer in Chicago. By 1926 her popularity in Chicago had given rise to a radio show and her first recording contract. Ruth's big break came when she was given a spot in the 1927 edition of the Ziegfeld Follies in which she introduced the hit song Shaking the Blues Away. This was followed by several more appearances in Ziegfeld shows, including the very last Follies that Florenz Zeigfeld himself produced in 1931. Throughout this period she also enjoyed a prolific recording career. Her stardom continued to rise during the 1930s and in some polls she was rated the most popular female vocalist in the country. Sadly, her private life did not mirror her show business success. A desperately unhappy marriage to Moe Snyder, a messy divorce, a shooting scandal of her future husband by Moe Snyder and a lawsuit against her prompted Ruth to escape the limelight and seek the solace of a private life. This collection features recordings made from 1930, a highpoint in her career, to 1937, the year of Ruth's final commercial recording session prior to her premature retirement. Among these songs are Exactly Like You, Guilty and It's Swell Of You (from her last session).
  1. Let Me Sing And I'm Happy
  2. It Happened In Monterey
  3. Exactly Like You
  4. Just A Little Closer
  5. Dancing With Tears In My Eyes...
  6. You're The One I Care For
  7. I'll Be Blue Just Thinking Of You...
  8. Love Is Like That (What Can You Do?)...
  9. (There Ought To Be A) Moonlight Savings Time...
  10. Now That You`re Gone
  11. When We're Alone - Penthouse Serenade...
  12. Guilty
  13. The Night That Love Was Born...
  14. Stay As Sweet As You Are
  15. Talking To Myself
  16. Life Is A Song (Let's Sing It Together)...
  17. Close Your Eyes
  18. Were Your Eyes Burning Baby?...
  19. It's Swell Of You
  20. Goodnight My Love
Syncopating Harmonists from New Orleans Cover
  • Syncopating Harmonists from New Orleans
  • Pop
  • The Boswell Sisters
  • 06/21/2011
  • Syncopating Harmonists from New Orleans
Liner Notes: These three young sisters, Martha, Connie and "Vet", were raised in New Orleans and their musical training clearly benefited from the jazz influence that prevailed there. All three were fine musicians and Martha, who played piano, was often their accompanist. During their years as a vocal trio they gained immense popularity for their syncopated stylings and innovative harmonies. In 1930, prior to launching their own recording career, the Sisters began attracting a following from radio broadcasts made in Hollywood. The shows were recorded on early 16-inch transcription discs for airing by participating radio stations. Nine of the selections included here are from those historic shows including I'm In Training For You. In 1930 they launched a highly successful recording career that continued until 1936 when the trio broke up. Connie (later Connee) continued on as a popular single artist. This collection, in addition to the 1930 radio shows, includes two rare tracks from a 1935 Dodge radio show, I'll Never Say "Never Again" Again and Lullaby Of Broadway. The remaining selections are from choice commercial recordings made by the Boswells between 1932 and 1935.
  1. I'm In Training For You
  2. When The Little Red Roses Get The Blues For You...
  3. Does My Baby Love?
  4. Song Of The Dawn
  5. Liza Lee
  6. Rarin' To Go
  7. There' A Wah-Wah Gal In Agua Calliente...
  8. I'm On A Diet Of Love
  9. The One I Love Just Can't Be Bothered With Me...
  10. Swanee Mammy
  11. If It Ain't Love
  12. Putting It On
  13. Don't Let Your Love Go Wrong...
  14. It's Written All Over Your Face...
  15. Why Don't You Practice What You Preach...
  16. Every Little Moment
  17. Way Back Home
  18. The Object Of My Affection...
  19. I'll Never Say "Never Again" Again...
  20. Lullaby Of Broadway
The First Torch Singers, Vol. I: The Twenties Cover
  • The First Torch Singers, Vol. I: The Twenties
  • Jazz
  • Various Artists
  • 06/21/2011
  • The First Torch Singers, Vol. I: The Twenties
Liner Notes: During the 1920s an unusual melancholy type of ballad surfaced in the midst of the raging jazz age. These would come to be known as torch songs and probably began with My Man; an English version of the French hit Mon Homme introduced by the chanteuse Mistinguet. Ziegfeld brought Mistinguet to New York to perform this moving number in his 1921 edition of the FOLLIES, but then turned the song over to Fanny Brice because Mistinguet's voice displeased him. Brice's poignant, heart-wrenching performance of My Man became an enormous success. Later, other songs of this type became the fashion such as Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man from Showboat, Love Me Or Leave Me, from Whoopee and Moanin' Low from The Little Show. These songs shared common theme of unfulfilled love for a man sung in a plaintive style—laments in which the singer was portrayed as a victim of a futile, if not outright abusive romance. Torch songs flourished following the introduction of electrical recordings; a new process in 1925 that improved sound and provided the intimate style essential to these passionate songs. This first volume offers torch songs from their inception in the 1920's.
  1. My Man <span class="various">by Fanny Brice</span>
  2. I'd Rather Be Blue Over You... <span class="various">by Fanny Brice</span>
  3. Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man <span class="various">by Helen Morgan</span>
  4. Don't Ever Leave Me <span class="various">by Helen Morgan</span>
  5. Love Me Or Leave Me <span class="various">by Ruth Etting</span>
  6. The Right Kind Of Man <span class="various">by Ruth Etting</span>
  7. Why Was I Born? <span class="various">by Libby Holman</span>
  8. More Than You Know <span class="various">by Libby Holman</span>
  9. The Man I Love <span class="various">by Sophie Tucker</span>
  10. Cause I Feel Low-Down <span class="various">by Sophie Tucker</span>
  11. That's How I Feel About You... <span class="various">by Belle Baker</span>
  12. I Still Go On Wanting You <span class="various">by Belle Baker</span>
  13. If You Want The Rainbow <span class="various">by Lee Morse</span>
  14. If I Can't Have You <span class="various">by Lee Morse</span>
  15. Maybe Who Knows <span class="various">by Kate Smith</span>
  16. That Wonderful Something Is Love... <span class="various">by Kate Smith</span>
  17. I Must Have That Man <span class="various">by Annette Hanshaw</span>
  18. What I Wouldn't Do For That Man... <span class="various">by Annette Hanshaw</span>
  19. Then You've Never Been Blue... <span class="various">by Frances Williams</span>
  20. Moanin' Low <span class="various">by Eva Taylor</span>
The Girl Next Door Cover
  • The Girl Next Door
  • Jazz
  • Annette Hanshaw
  • 06/21/2011
  • The Girl Next Door
Liner Notes: During parties, young Annette Hanshaw was invariably asked to sing to her parent's guests. On one occasion in 1926, a recording manager for Pathe Records heard Annette and asked her to make a test record. Annette, then only 16, made the record and then nervously added, "that's all" when she finished recording. The test was well received and her ending tag amused the recording staff. She continued using it on future recordings. In short order Annette became a popular artist on a variety of major labels, often backed by fine jazz musicians. Her intimate voice and charming style of singing—a new and fresh sound—had a wide appeal to the record buying public. According to reliable accounts, Hanshaw disliked her own voice and couldn't bear listening to her own records. Fortunately, she was in the minority when it came to that opinion. But she retired from the profession in 1934 at the tender age of 24 while still at the top of her recording career. Excellent samples of these recordings are That's You Baby, Daddy Won't You Please Come Home and Am I Blue. She continued as a radio performer until 1941 because "she didn't have to hear herself singing on radio". To this day, records made by this shy, reluctant artist remain highly prized by collectors.
  1. It All Depends On You
  2. My Blackbirds Are Bluebirds Now...
  3. I Can't Give You Anything But Love...
  4. In A Great Big Way
  5. Lover Come Back To Me
  6. You Wouldn't Fool Me Would You...
  7. Button Up Your Overcoat
  8. I Get The Blues When It Rains...
  9. That's You Baby
  10. Big City Blues
  11. My Sin
  12. I Think You'll Like It
  13. Daddy Won't You Please Come Home...
  14. I Love A Ukelele
  15. Am I Blue
  16. (I'm A Dreamer) Aren't We All...
  17. I Have To Have You
  18. Happy Days Are Here Again
  19. Ho Hum
  20. Say It Isn't So
Save the Last Dance for Me Cover
  • Save the Last Dance for Me
  • Big Band
  • Russ Columbo
  • 06/21/2011
  • Save the Last Dance for Me
Liner Notes: Born Ruggiero Eugenio de Rudolpho Columbo in 1908, Russ was the youngest of twelve children in his family. As a child he learned to play the violin. By 1927 young Russ Columbo started playing professionally and in 1928 joined the prestigious Gus Arnheim Orchestra at the world famous Coconut Grove in Los Angeles. Russ played violin, sang in a trio, and performed solo vocals with Arnheim's group. Peach Of A Pair is one of three selections from this set he recorded with Arnheim. However, it was his good looks and romantic baritone voice that caught the attention of celebrity patrons at the Grove. Having left Gus Arnheim in 1931, Columbo began a successful solo recording career as a leading crooner. Prisoner Of Love, a song he co-wrote, is from that period. From 1931 to 1934 he performed on radio and appeared in several films. But with the promise of greater celebrity still ahead of him, Columbo's career was suddenly cut short by an accidental shooting by a good friend showing him an antique Civil War dueling pistol. His premature loss was deeply mourned within the entertainment community. When You're In Love, was waxed at Columbo's last recording session barely a month prior to this tragic event.
  1. Back In Your Own Back Yard...
  2. I Can't Do It Without You
  3. Peach Of A Pair
  4. Sweet And Lovely
  5. I Don't Know Why (I Just Do)...
  6. Prisoner Of Love
  7. Time On My Hands
  8. All Of Me
  9. You Try Somebody Else
  10. Paradise
  11. Living In Dreams
  12. I See Two Lovers
  13. Too Beautiful For Words
  14. When You're In Love
  15. Let's Pretend There's A Moon...
  16. I Love Prince Pizzicato
  17. Coffee In The Morning And Kisses At Night...
  18. Just Another Dream Of You
  19. Auf Weidersehen, My Dear
  20. Save The Last Dance For Me...
Gus Arnheim : Echoes from the Coconut Grove Cover
  • Gus Arnheim : Echoes from the Coconut Grove
  • Big Band
  • Various Artists
  • 06/21/2011
  • Gus Arnheim : Echoes from the Coconut Grove
Liner Notes: The Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles offered posh, resort type accommodations that attracted dignitaries, socialites and celebrities. It was also the home of the Coconut Grove—a world famous nightclub that catered to this set. From 1928 to 1931 Gus Arnheim's orchestra was in residence as the Grove's popular house band. He was called "the star of entertainers and the entertainer of stars". Indeed, if stars were to be seen, it was rarely in Hollywood, but at the Coconut Grove. Not surprisingly, several musicians and vocalists who performed with Arnheim at this time soon became stars themselves, including Bing Crosby, Fred MacMurray, Russ Columbo, Jack Smith and Donald Novis. Selections in this collection are transferred from rare radio transcriptions made in 1931. We are fortunate these transcriptions were saved, since Gus Arnheim failed to make commercial releases of a great many songs that have only survived thanks to these shows. Moreover, these numbers are performed in a more relaxed and spontaneous style of a nightclub rather than in the controlled setting of a recording studio. The two vocals by Bing Crosby for Out Of Nowhere and What Is It? were actually recorded live from the Grove, making them especially atmospheric.
  1. Sweet Georgia Brown <span class="various">by Orchestra</span>
  2. Just One More Chance <span class="various">by Jack Smith</span>
  3. Roll On Mississippi, Roll On... <span class="various">by George Gramlich</span>
  4. By A Lazy Country Lane <span class="various">by Loyce Whiteman</span>
  5. At Your Command <span class="various">by Don Novis</span>
  6. My Sweet Tooth Says I Wanna... <span class="various">by Orchestra</span>
  7. You Said It <span class="various">by Loyce Whiteman</span>
  8. Lies <span class="various">by Dave Marshall (Three Ambassadors)</span>
  9. Nobody`s Sweetheart <span class="various">by Harry Barris (Three Ambassadors)</span>
  10. You`re The Surest Cure For The Blues... <span class="various">by Three Ambassadors</span>
  11. You Don`t Know What You`re Doing... <span class="various">by Loyce Whiteman</span>
  12. There`s Nothing Too Good For My Baby... <span class="various">by Harry Barris</span>
  13. Any Corner Is A Cosy Corner... <span class="various">by Loyce Whiteman</span>
  14. She Went Havana <span class="various">by George Gramlich</span>
  15. It`s Love <span class="various">by Loyce Whiteman</span>
  16. Love For Sale <span class="various">by Orchestra</span>
  17. Can't You Read Between The Lines... <span class="various">by George Gramlich</span>
  18. Why Dance <span class="various">by Don Novis</span>
  19. Out Of Nowhere <span class="various">by Bing Crosby</span>
  20. What Is It <span class="various">by Bing Crosby And Loyce Whiteman</span>
The First Crooners, Vol. I: The Twenties Cover
  • The First Crooners, Vol. I: The Twenties
  • Pop
  • Various Artists
  • 06/22/2011
  • The First Crooners, Vol. I: The Twenties
Liner Notes: It's always interesting to speculate to what extent technology and entertainment are intertwined. Today, performers can attract a large audience, filling entire stadiums, thanks to the electronic amplification of voice and instruments, without which neither could be heard in such a venue. A similar situation existed in the mid-1920s when the microphone was introduced for recordings. Prior to that, artists needed to shout into a horn, whereby the vibrations physically engraved the sound onto a wax disc. This was fine for artists with powerful, penetrating voices (belters) or classically trained singers, but a disadvantage for those with more subtle tonality. The microphone suddenly opened the door for smaller voiced singers and even for belters who chose to sing in a more subdued and intimate style. Moreover, electrical recordings vastly improved fidelity and provided greater dynamic range than ever before, and for the first time recordings began sounding natural. Soon a more relaxed and intimate style of singing gained popularity. In time, this style of singing by male artists became known as "crooning". For the next two decades this would become the dominant style for most popular vocalists. Gay Love, I Gotta Have You and Glad Rag Doll all provide early examples of this style by well-known pioneer crooners of the 1920s.
  1. Sentimental Baby <span class="various">by Gene Austin With Ben Pollack Orchestra</span>
  2. What a Night, What a Girl <span class="various">by Les Backer</span>
  3. The Spell of the Blues <span class="various">by Sam Coslow With The High Hatters</span>
  4. Gay Love <span class="various">by Bing Crosby</span>
  5. Blue Shadows <span class="various">by Segar Ellis</span>
  6. My Sweeter Than Sweet <span class="various">by Sammy Fain (The Crooning Composer)</span>
  7. Reaching for Someone <span class="various">by Chester Gaylord (The Whispering Serenader)</span>
  8. Hollywood <span class="various">by Art Gillham (The Whispering Pianist)</span>
  9. Perhaps <span class="various">by Charles W. Hamp</span>
  10. You Were Meant for Me <span class="various">by Irving Kaufman</span>
  11. Broadway Melody <span class="various">by Charles King</span>
  12. Honey <span class="various">by Charles C. Locke</span>
  13. The Song I Love <span class="various">by Nick Lucas (The Crooning Troubadour)</span>
  14. I Gotta Have You <span class="various">by Red Mckenzie</span>
  15. Suppose Nobody Cared <span class="various">by Dick Powell With Charlie Davis And His Orchestra</span>
  16. Some Sweet Day <span class="various">by Dick Robertson</span>
  17. Peace of Mind <span class="various">by Dick Robertson With Willard Robison His Deep River</span>
  18. Glad Rag Doll <span class="various">by Jack Smith (The Whispering Baritone)</span>
  19. You`re Just Another Memory... <span class="various">by Eddie Thomas</span>
  20. If I Had You <span class="various">by Rudy Vallee With His Connecticut Yankees</span>
The First Torch Singers, Vol. 2: 1930 - 1934 Cover
  • The First Torch Singers, Vol. 2: 1930 - 1934
  • Pop
  • Various Artists
  • 06/22/2011
  • The First Torch Singers, Vol. 2: 1930 - 1934
Liner Notes: In the early to mid-1920s, female singers with big voices often portrayed women as hard-boiled Mamas who dominated men. For example, there was Hard-Hearted Hannah who "throws water on a drowning man" and Hard-to-Get Gertie whose "heart is colder than an ice cream freezer." This was clearly a time of liberation for the female sex who, in addition to voting, took to smoking, drinking, cutting their hair short and wearing pants—inspiring an amusing novelty song called "Masculine Women! Feminine Men!" from 1926, that can be heard on our 1920's collection, Wonderful Nonsense -- Fun Songs of The Roaring Twenties. But by 1930, songs about browbeating mamas and hen-pecked papas had given way to sad songs about frail and lonely women, often in unrequited love affairs with men who were indifferent, insensitive, or even abusive. Fanny Brice, Ruth Etting, Helen Morgan and Libby Holman were the earliest of the torch singers and, ironically, they experienced in their personal lives the very unhappiness they often sang about. The remaining vocalists represent an all-star cast from that period. From the early to mid-1930s, the period covered in this second volume, torch songs flourished, becoming fashionable as a performance style. Three classic torch songs by recorded in this period include Stormy Weather, When We're In Love and Nevertheless.
  1. I've Got To Sing A Torch Song... <span class="various">by Helen Rowland With Ed Kirkeby Orchestra</span>
  2. No More Love <span class="various">by Ruth Etting</span>
  3. Something To Remember You By... <span class="various">by Helen Morgan</span>
  4. Love For Sale <span class="various">by Libby Holman</span>
  5. He's My Secret Passion <span class="various">by Marion Harris</span>
  6. Overnight <span class="various">by Belle Baker</span>
  7. Don't Blame Me <span class="various">by Ethel Waters</span>
  8. Moon Song <span class="various">by Kate Smith</span>
  9. I'll Never Be The Same <span class="various">by Adelaide Hall</span>
  10. Wasting My Love On You <span class="various">by Lee Morse</span>
  11. Give Me Liberty Or Give Me Love... <span class="various">by Irene Taylor</span>
  12. Until Love Comes Along <span class="various">by Bebe Daniels</span>
  13. When We're Alone (Penthouse Serenade)... <span class="various">by Sylvia Froos</span>
  14. Stormy Weather <span class="various">by Frances Langford</span>
  15. Stop The Sun, Stop The Moon... <span class="various">by Mildred Bailey</span>
  16. Am I To Blame <span class="various">by Greta Keller</span>
  17. Nevertheless (I'm In Love With You)... <span class="various">by Welcome Lewis</span>
  18. Too Many Tears <span class="various">by Go Go Delyse With Jimmie Grier Orchestra</span>
  19. My Old Flame <span class="various">by Zora Layman</span>
  20. Be Still My Heart <span class="various">by Gertrude Niesen</span>
The Elegant Eddy Duchin Cover
  • The Elegant Eddy Duchin
  • Pop
  • Various Artists
  • 06/22/2011
  • The Elegant Eddy Duchin
Liner Notes: Elegant is an apt word to describe the fashionable society band directed by pianist Eddy Duchin during the 1930s. For a time he was engaged as a pharmacist but eventually turned to music leaving behind a splendid recorded legacy from which 22 selections are included here. His start as a pianist came with the prestigious Leo Reisman Orchestra, first at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel then at the swank Central Park Casino. By 1932 Duchin became the leader of this dance band and short time the handsome and personable Duchin became a hit with the cream of society wherever he played. In 1933 Eddy Duchin and His Orchestra began recording for Victor and in the next five years cut some 160 songs for this label. Many of these were songs featured in films and a surprising number of them became standards. Most the vocals choruses, including I Only Have Eyes For You, were by performed by Lew Sherwood whose pleasing voice was ideal for romantic ballads. Sherwood also played trumpet in the band. On occasion other established personalities would record guest vocals, for example, crooner Buddy Clark's Heaven Help This Heart Of Mine and composer Harold Arlen's Ill Wind. This first album offers a prime sample of the elegant Duchin sound from 1933 to 1937.
  1. It`s Delovely <span class="various">by Jerry Cooper</span>
  2. Moon Over Miami <span class="various">by Lew Sherwood</span>
  3. Love Is Good for Anything That Ails You... <span class="various">by Lew Sherwood</span>
  4. I Only Have Eyes For You <span class="various">by Lew Sherwood</span>
  5. When A Woman Loves A Man <span class="various">by The De Marco Sisters</span>
  6. It`s The Talk of the Town <span class="various">by Lew Sherwood</span>
  7. Too Marvelous For Words <span class="various">by Jerry Cooper</span>
  8. A Star Is Born <span class="various">by Buddy Clark</span>
  9. I`ve Got a Feelin` You`re Foolin`... <span class="various">by Lew Sherwood</span>
  10. Let`s Fall In Love <span class="various">by Lew Sherwood</span>
  11. Close Your Eyes <span class="various">by Lew Sherwood</span>
  12. Dames <span class="various">by Lew Sherwood</span>
  13. I Cover The Waterfront <span class="various">by Lew Sherwood</span>
  14. Did You Ever See A Dream Walking?... <span class="various">by Lew Sherwood</span>
  15. Haunting Me <span class="various">by Lew Sherwood</span>
  16. South Sea Island Magic <span class="various">by Lew Sherwood</span>
  17. Ill Wind <span class="various">by Harold Arlen</span>
  18. Isn`t This A Lovely Day? <span class="various">by Lew Sherwood</span>
  19. Flirtation Walk <span class="various">by Lew Sherwood</span>
  20. I See Two Lovers <span class="various">by Lew Sherwood</span>
  21. Heaven Help This Heart of Mine... <span class="various">by Buddy Clark</span>
  22. Lights Out <span class="various">by Lew Sherwood</span>
A Time to Relax Cover
  • A Time to Relax
  • Pop
  • Gene Austin
  • 06/22/2011
  • A Time to Relax
Liner Notes: Gene Austin's recording career, which spanned some 35 years, started in 1924. But from 1927 for nearly a decade Austin was one of the nation's leading recording artists. In September of that year he chanced to record a song called My Blue Heaven that became a million-seller. It was a spectacular success for that time and easily equivalent to a platinum recording today. Born Eugene Lucas in Texas in 1900, Austin grew up in Louisiana where he acquired an interest in country Blues. At age 19 he saw action in World War I and after his service entered the University of Maryland to study dentistry, then law--but his love of music won out and he went into vaudeville doing his act with Roy Bergere. In 1924 Austin made a number of country records with George Reneau, "The Blind Musician of the Smokey Mountains", then signed with the Victor label focusing on pop tunes of the day. His first hit for Victor was a 1925 recording of When My Sugar Walks Down the Street which he co-wrote. From the late 20s through the 30s Austin covered the major hit tunes of the period, many of which are included in this set. His warm, soothing tenor voice with a touch of southern dialect won him a very loyal following for live performances as well as recordings.
  1. When My Sugar Walks Down The Street...
  2. Nothin'
  3. My Blue Heaven
  4. She's Funny That Way
  5. St. Louis Blues
  6. A Garden In The Rain
  7. I've Got A Feeling I'm Falling...
  8. My Fate Is In Your Hands
  9. Rollin' Down The River
  10. Ain't Misbehavin'
  11. St. James Infirmary
  12. If I Could Be With You
  13. Crying Myself To Sleep
  14. Under A Texas Moon
  15. Now You're In My Arms
  16. Guilty
  17. Love Letters In The Sand
  18. Jam House Blues
  19. Did You Ever See A Dream Walking...
  20. When I'm With You
Moanin` Low Cover
  • Moanin` Low
  • Pop
  • Libby Holman
  • 06/22/2011
  • Moanin` Low
Liner Notes: Born Elizabeth Holzman in Cincinnati, Ohio in 1904, this daughter of a successful attorney considered the study of law, but decided instead to give the stage a whirl and made her Broadway debut in 1925. In 1929 Libby got her big break in a Revue called The Little Show in which she introduced Moanin' Low and Can't We Be Friends, both were immediate hits. The following year she appeared in an even greater success, The Little Show, the Revue in which she introduced Body And Soul and Something To Remember You By both of which became standards. In 1931 she married Zachary Smith, the heir to the Reynolds Tobacco fortune and in the course of a drunken party, Zachary died from a bullet wound with Libby as the prime suspect in the shooting. The case never went to trial, but the notoriety damaged her as a celebrity. Misfortune continued to be a constant companion to Libby throughout her life including the death of a son in a mountain climbing accident, the unusual demise of several close friends and her own accidental death from Carbon monoxide poisoning while trapped in her garage. This album features recordings made by Holman from 1927 to 1934, while still in her heyday as a torch singer.
  1. Moanin' Low
  2. Can't We Be Friends?
  3. Who's That Knocking At My Door?...
  4. There Ain't No Sweet Man That's Worth The Salt Of My Tears...
  5. He's A Good Man To Have Around...
  6. The Way He Loves Is Just Too Bad...
  7. I'm Doin' What I'm Doin' For Love...
  8. I May Be Wrong - But I Think You're Wonderful...
  9. My Man Is On The Make
  10. Here Am I
  11. Find Me A Primitive Man
  12. A Ship Without A Sail
  13. What Is This Thing Called Love?...
  14. Cooking Breakfast For The One I Love...
  15. Body And Soul
  16. Something To Remember You By...
  17. I'm One Of God's Children - Who Hasn't Got Wings...
  18. You And The Night And The Music...
  19. When You Love Only One
  20. Moanin' Low
Phil Harris : Echoes from the Coconut Grove Cover
  • Phil Harris : Echoes from the Coconut Grove
  • Pop
  • Various Artists
  • 06/22/2011
  • Phil Harris : Echoes from the Coconut Grove
Liner Notes: Phil Harris was born in Indiana in 1904 to a musical family--his father played piano for Ringling Bros. Circus. They moved to Nashville where his father formed a dance band and young Phil was allowed to join in on drums. In 1928 formed the Lofner-Harris band with partner Carol Lofner. For the 1932-33 season Phil became the bandleader at the Coconut Grove, following in the footsteps of Jimmie Grier. However, Harris put his own stamp on entertainment at The Grove. By contrast to his predecessors, Arnheim and Grier, he was the first bandleader there who also performed as a vocalist and an attraction. Phil's pronounced southern drawl seemed to please the patrons. The Three Ambassadors including Jack Smith remained as vocalists and charming Leah Ray, affectionately called "the dimples from Dixie," was added as the female singer. The selections included here are from rare radio transcriptions and include such standards as Lazy River, 12th Street Rag and also the somewhat suggestive How's About It, a novelty duet with Phil and Leah. Phil's star continued its rise when in 1936 he became a regular on the Jack Benny Show. In 1941 he and Alice Faye were married and from 1946-1955 they starred in their own hit radio show. By the late 50s, he began a retirement from show business.
  1. Got A Date With An Angel <span class="various">by Orchestra</span>
  2. How Can You Say No (When All The World Is Saying Yes?)... <span class="various">by Leah Ray</span>
  3. Rockin` Chair <span class="various">by Phil Harris</span>
  4. Baby <span class="various">by The Three Ambassadors</span>
  5. I`m Making Hay In The Moonlight... <span class="various">by Leah Ray</span>
  6. The Vamp <span class="various">by Orchestra</span>
  7. Mimi <span class="various">by The Three Ambassadors</span>
  8. How`s About It <span class="various">by Phil Harris & Leah Ray</span>
  9. Linger A Little Longer In The Twilight... <span class="various">by Lee Norton</span>
  10. You`re Getting To Be A Habit With Me... <span class="various">by Leah Ray</span>
  11. You (Just Wonderful You) <span class="various">by Orchestra</span>
  12. Lazy River <span class="various">by Phil Harris</span>
  13. The Cop On The Beat, The Man In The Moon, And Me... <span class="various">by Leah Ray</span>
  14. Young And Healthy <span class="various">by The Three Ambassadors</span>
  15. A Million Dreams <span class="various">by Jeffrey Gill</span>
  16. 12th Street Rag <span class="various">by Orchestra</span>
  17. We Better Get Together Again... <span class="various">by Leah Ray & The Three Ambassadors</span>
  18. I`ve Got Nothing To Do But Love... <span class="various">by Phil Harris</span>
  19. Along Came Love <span class="various">by The Three Ambassadors</span>
  20. ' Til Tomorrow <span class="various">by Jack Smith</span>
The Sophisticated Stylings of Eddy Duchin Cover
  • The Sophisticated Stylings of Eddy Duchin
  • Pop
  • Various Artists
  • 06/22/2011
  • The Sophisticated Stylings of Eddy Duchin
Liner Notes: This is a companion album to the first volume, The Elegant Eddy Duchin, and provides more selections from his 1933-37 recordings for the Victor label. The rhythmic, sweet band sound with polished arrangements featuring Duchin's piano was an attraction to the affluent set who could afford the upscale venue in which this orchestra played. While playing at the Central Park Casino Duchin fell in love with Marjorie Oelrichs, one of many wealthy debutants who came night after night to to see and hear him. They married in 1934 after a three-year romance. But the marriage was a brief one; Marjorie died a few days after giving birth to their son Peter. Eddy died prematurely of leukemia in 1951. Peter, also an excellent pianist, kept his father's tradition alive as a respected bandleader. While many could not afford the high-end clubs in which bands such as Duchin's played, those fortunate enough to own radios could listen free to live, late night broadcasts of their favorite bands. Duchin's records also afforded a means to play and enjoy hits like Cheek To Cheek, Pennies From Heaven, Lovely To Look At and other favorites in the comfort of one's home.
  1. The Camera Doesn`t Lie <span class="various">by Buddy Clark</span>
  2. Cheek to Cheek <span class="various">by Lew Sherwood</span>
  3. I Can`t Escape From You <span class="various">by Jerry Cooper</span>
  4. Why Do I Dream Those Dreams?... <span class="various">by Lew Sherwood</span>
  5. Pennies From Heaven <span class="various">by Lew Sherwood</span>
  6. I`m Going Shopping With You... <span class="various">by Lew Sherwood</span>
  7. A Hundred Years From Today... <span class="various">by Lew Sherwood</span>
  8. Dust On The Moon <span class="various">by Lew Sherwood</span>
  9. I Won`t Dance <span class="various">by Lew Sherwood</span>
  10. Riptide <span class="various">by Lew Sherwood & The De Marco Sisters</span>
  11. You Are My Lucky Star <span class="various">by Lew Sherwood</span>
  12. I`m Building Up To An Awful Letdown... <span class="various">by Lew Sherwood</span>
  13. The Words Are In My Heart <span class="various">by Lew Sherwood</span>
  14. Let`s Call The Whole Thing Off... <span class="various">by Jerry Cooper</span>
  15. Easy Come, Easy Go <span class="various">by The De Marco Sisters</span>
  16. I Just Couldn`t Take It Baby... <span class="various">by Lew Sherwood</span>
  17. La Cumparsita <span class="various">by Instrumental</span>
  18. Lovely To Look At <span class="various">by Lew Sherwood</span>
  19. A Needle In A Haystack <span class="various">by Lew Sherwood</span>
  20. Moonlight and Shadows <span class="various">by Lew Sherwood</span>
The First Crooners, Vol. 2: 1930 - 1934 Cover
  • The First Crooners, Vol. 2: 1930 - 1934
  • Big Band
  • Various Artists
  • 06/22/2011
  • The First Crooners, Vol. 2: 1930 - 1934
Liner Notes: In the early 1930s crooning became something of a rage, especially with women. Crooners like Bing Crosby, Rudy Vallee and Russ Columbo led the way and set a style that influenced other singers of the time. Radio and talking pictures were reaching a mass audience and creating new stars overnight. Rudy Vallee, in particular, became a sensation on early radio. Both Crosby and Columbo gained celebrity from early film appearances. While the women swooned over crooners, their men often found this intimate, romantic type of singing on the effeminate side. After all, this was an age where men were men and male vocalists were expected to belt out songs with a manly voice. Crooning was even spoofed in songs like Learn To Croon written and sung by Sam Coslow and Boo Boo Boo by Crosby himself. Still, nothing would turn back the trend and crooning was here to stay, at least for another two decades. Although the vocalists in this collection had their start in the 1920s, they made a smooth transition to the romantic style of the early 1930's. Good Night Sweetheart, Love Is The Sweetest Thing and Try A Little Tenderness represent period classics which were ready made for crooners.
  1. Blue Kentucky Moon <span class="various">by Gene Austin</span>
  2. You Brought A New Kind Of Love To Me... <span class="various">by Smith Ballew</span>
  3. Love Is The Sweetest Thing... <span class="various">by Al Bowlly With Ray Noble</span>
  4. Cocktails For Two <span class="various">by Carl Brisson</span>
  5. Out In The Cold Again <span class="various">by Chick Bullock</span>
  6. Evening <span class="various">by Buddy Clark With Gus Arnheim</span>
  7. Good Night Sweetheart <span class="various">by Russ Columbo</span>
  8. Learn To Croon <span class="various">by Sam Coslow Accompanied By The Islanders</span>
  9. Boo Boo Boo <span class="various">by Bing Crosby</span>
  10. Singing A Song To The Stars... <span class="various">by Cliff Edwards</span>
  11. Don`t Tell Her What Happened To Me... <span class="various">by Sammy Fain</span>
  12. Confessin` That I Love You... <span class="various">by Art Gillham</span>
  13. Hold Me <span class="various">by Little Jack Little</span>
  14. Hello! Beautiful! <span class="various">by Nick Lucas With His Crooning Troubadours</span>
  15. You`re My Everything <span class="various">by Jack Miller</span>
  16. Try A Little Tenderness <span class="various">by Charlie Palloy</span>
  17. Happiness Ahead <span class="various">by Dick Powell</span>
  18. I Love To See The Evenin` Sun Go Down... <span class="various">by Singin` Sam</span>
  19. It`s Only A Paper Moon <span class="various">by Conrad Thibault Accompanied By Ray Sinatra</span>
  20. Without That Certain Thing... <span class="various">by Rudy Vallee</span>
The Vintage Recordings of Cliff Edwards (Ukulele Ike) Cover
  • The Vintage Recordings of Cliff Edwards (Ukulele Ike)
  • Pop
  • Cliff Edwards
  • 06/23/2011
  • The Vintage Recordings of Cliff Edwards (Ukulele Ike)
Liner Notes: Cliff Edwards, also known as Ukulele Ike, was a veteran of Vaudeville, starred in the Ziegfeld Follies, appeared in over 80 films as a character actor and singer, made hundreds of recordings, starred on his own radio show and performed frequently on TV. He introduced the hit songs Ja Da, Singin' In The Rain and the Oscar winning song When You Wish Upon A Star as the voice for Jiminy Cricket in the film Pinocchio. Edwards was born in Hannibal, Missouri in 1904. As a young man he entertained in cafes and clubs, playing the ukulele for self-accompaniment. By the early 1920s he became established as a successful recording artist and continued making records in 1956 on LP. In addition to his commercial releases, Edwards recorded a vast number of selections on numerous radio transcriptions in the 1940s. This collection covers the years from 1922 to 1944 with many excellent examples of Cliff Edwards in his prime. Among his popular releases are I'll See You In My Dreams and Somebody Loves Me also including unissued test pressings of It Had To Be You and My Melancholy Baby. All are numbers showcase his warm, expressive voice.
  1. Homesick
  2. I Want Somebody To Cheer Me Up...
  3. I'm Crying 'cause I Know I'm Losing You...
  4. Half-Way To Heaven
  5. That's My Weakness Now
  6. Together
  7. I Can't Make Her Happy That Old Girl Of Mine...
  8. It Goes Like This That Funny Melody...
  9. Good Little Bad Little You...
  10. My Old Girl's My New Girl Now...
  11. Singin' In The Rain
  12. I'll See You In My Dreams
  13. Hush My Mouth If I Ain't Goin' South...
  14. Love Is Just Around The Corner...
  15. One Little Kiss
  16. Somebody Loves Me
  17. It Had To Be You
  18. A Love Like Ours
  19. Hold On To Your Heart
  20. My Melancholy Baby
Lee Morse : A Musical Portrait Cover
  • Lee Morse : A Musical Portrait
  • Jazz
  • Lee Morse
  • 06/23/2011
  • Lee Morse : A Musical Portrait
Liner Notes: Lee Morse was about 5 feet tall, barely 100 pounds soaking wet with a powerful voice and amazing range covering more than 3 octaves. In vaudeville she began singing behind a screen in her lower register leading the audience to expect a man. This thin, petite lady would then appear and continue singing in a soprano range. "One Small Girl A Whole Quartet" was the billing she was given. Lee was at home with energetic novelty tunes yet brought tears to ones eyes with heartfelt ballads. Morse was born, Lena Taylor to a large, musical family with southern roots. Her father was a preacher and one of the original Texas Rangers. In 1915 she married Elmer Morse in Idaho and kept Morse as her stage name although the marriage didn't last. Her stage career began in 1920 followed by a successful career as recording artist in 1924. Unfortunately, Lee's fiery temper, eccentric personality and problem with alcohol kept her from fully achieving the stardom she deserved. These recordings provide a fitting tribute to this remarkable, but enigmatic performer. Blue, Turning Grey Over You and Something In The Night demonstrate her skills as a torch singer while Walking My Baby Back Home and It's The Girls are good examples of her novelty approach. Her Blue Grass Boys support Morse with excellent jazz backing.
  1. Want A Little Lovin'
  2. He's Still My Baby
  3. Side By Side
  4. Old Fashioned Romance
  5. Be Sweet To Me
  6. Keep Sweeping The Cobwebs Off The Moon...
  7. Don't Keep Me In The Dark Bright Eyes...
  8. Miss You
  9. Blue, Turning Grey Over You...
  10. Tain't No Sin (To Dance Around In Your Bones)...
  11. Nobody Cares If I'm Blue
  12. I Still Get A Thrill (Thinking Of You)...
  13. Walking My Baby Back Home
  14. By My Side
  15. I'm An Unemployed Sweetheart...
  16. It's The Girls
  17. Something In The Night
  18. When I Lost You
  19. Careless Love
  20. Don't Even Change A Picture On The Wall...
Jimmie Grier : Echoes from the Coconut Grove Cover
  • Jimmie Grier : Echoes from the Coconut Grove
  • Pop
  • Various Artists
  • 06/23/2011
  • Jimmie Grier : Echoes from the Coconut Grove
Liner Notes: In 1932, Jimmie Grier took the reins as bandleader at the Coconut Grove. He was no stranger to this prestigious nightclub since he played reed, first violin and served as an arranger for Gus Arnheim, his predecessor. Arnheim was described as a quiet, gentlemanly person and by contrast Grier was alleged to be a fun-loving guy sometimes bordering on prankster. And while the personality of the leaders may have changed, the music at the Grove retained its same high standard in the tradition of "the west coast sound" during Grier's tenancy. The Three Ambassadors, Donald Novis and Loyce Whiteman, all from the Arnheim era, remained as the main vocalists while Dick Webster and Margaret Lawrence were also added to this cast in 1932. All selections included here were taken directly from rare radio transcriptions that included scores of excellent songs never commercially recorded by Jimmie Grier. Featured here is one true standard Stardust and several period hits including Two Loves Have I, Bend Down Sister and I Idolize My Baby's Eyes. Every selection here are enjoyable examples of favorites of the period.
  1. Bend Down Sister <span class="various">by Three Ambassadors</span>
  2. Stardust <span class="various">by Don Novis</span>
  3. By The Sycamore Tree <span class="various">by Loyce Whiteman</span>
  4. We`ve Got To Put That Sun Back In The Sky... <span class="various">by Three Ambassadors</span>
  5. Just Temporarily Blue <span class="various">by Orchestra</span>
  6. Tell Tales <span class="various">by Loyce Whiteman</span>
  7. I Promise You <span class="various">by Dick Webster</span>
  8. The More You Hurt Me <span class="various">by Margaret Lawrence</span>
  9. Kiss By Kiss (I`m Falling In Love With You)... <span class="various">by Three Ambassadors</span>
  10. You Could Have Been The One Baby... <span class="various">by Loyce Whiteman</span>
  11. Two Loves Have I <span class="various">by Don Novis</span>
  12. What Did You Do With It? <span class="various">by Margaret Lawrence</span>
  13. Sugar <span class="various">by Orchestra</span>
  14. I Idolize My Baby`s Eyes <span class="various">by Loyce Whiteman</span>
  15. Where The Blue Of The Night (Meets the Gold of the Day)... <span class="various">by Don Novis</span>
  16. Tired <span class="various">by Loyce Whiteman</span>
  17. Ooh, That Kiss <span class="various">by Three Ambassadors</span>
  18. Was That The Human Thing To Do?... <span class="various">by Margaret Lawrence</span>
  19. Goodnight Moon <span class="various">by Dick Webster</span>
  20. Music In The Moonlight <span class="various">by Don Novis</span>
Ruth Etting : Glorifier of American Song Cover
  • Ruth Etting : Glorifier of American Song
  • Pop
  • Ruth Etting
  • 06/23/2011
  • Ruth Etting : Glorifier of American Song
Liner Notes: It is remarkable that a young Nebraskan farm girl with a severe stuttering problem would one day be called the "Glorifier of American Song"—one of several titles bestowed on Ruth Etting during her career. In the 1930s she was at the height of her popularity, although all was not well in the country. The Depression had struck and financial suffering was spreading. During this period record sales plummeted, numerous labels went under and even releases by favorites like Etting became difficult to sell. It is the purpose of this collection to present Etting's hard-to-find releases from that time. Although sales were down, Etting made some of her finest records in these difficult years. Among these are All Of Me, Hold Me, It's A Sin To Tell A Lie (released in England) and Whose Honey Are You? (from a very rare radio transcription). In addition we include two numbers recorded at a private session in 1958, years after her retirement—one of which, After You've Gone, was Ruth's favorite song Ruth retired in 1937 while still a popular artist. She attempted a comeback on radio during the 1940s with modest success but her time had past. Time had come for a new generation of singers.
  1. Were You Sincere?
  2. Me!
  3. All Of Me
  4. Home
  5. Without That Gal
  6. Can't We Talk It Over
  7. (I'm Still Without A Sweetheart) With Summer Comin'...
  8. Lazy Day
  9. I'll Never Have To Dream Again...
  10. How Can I Go On Without You?...
  11. Linger A Little Longer In The Twilight...
  12. Hold Me
  13. Tomorrow Who Cares?
  14. Whose Honey Are You?
  15. It's A Sin To Tell A Lie
  16. Holiday Sweetheart
  17. There's Something In The Air...
  18. On A Little Dream Ranch
  19. There'll Be Some Changes Made...
  20. After You've Gone
Is Everybody Happy Now? Cover
  • Is Everybody Happy Now?
  • Jazz
  • Ted Lewis
  • 06/23/2011
  • Is Everybody Happy Now?
Liner Notes: It is hard to describe Ted Lewis—as an entertainer he was in a class by himself. Lewis was not considered a great clarinetist and he talked rather than sang his lyrics, yet he continued to perform for nearly 60 years. His trademark was the familiar phrase, "Is Everybody Happy?" and a crumpled top hat. The type of music Lewis played was so unique and enjoyable that it was never in, or out of style. He was born Theodore Friedman in Circleville Ohio in 1890 to parents who ran a local clothing store. Against his parents wishes Lewis chose a career in music and began playing in vaudeville around 1906. In time he formed his own orchestra in which he played clarinet in a klezmer-like style and by 1919 started a highly successful recording career. This album features his recordings from 1926 to 1932, an especially choice period because of the great songs he released and also for the top jazz sidemen that played with him—such as Benny Goodman, Jack Teagarden, Fats Waller and many others. Numbers included here are San, I'm Crazy 'Bout My Baby (with vocal by Fats Waller), Someday Sweetheart and Dip Your Brush In The Sunshine are just four of the great selections provided here
  1. Is Everybody Happy Now
  2. Frankie And Johnny
  3. When My Baby Smiles At Me
  4. Darktown Strutter' Ball
  5. Aunt Hagar's Blues
  6. You've Got That Thing
  7. The Lonesome Road
  8. Egyptian Ella
  9. Home Made Sunshine
  10. San
  11. I'm Crazy 'bout My Baby
  12. Sobbin' Blues
  13. I'm All Dressed Up With A Broken Heart...
  14. Royal Garden Blues
  15. Someday Sweetheart
  16. Dip Your Brush In The Sunshine...
  17. I'm Sure Of Everything But You...
  18. Somebody Loves You
  19. An Ev'ning In Caroline
  20. Old Playmate
The First Torch Singers, Vol. 3: 1935 - 1940 Cover
  • The First Torch Singers, Vol. 3: 1935 - 1940
  • Pop
  • Various Artists
  • 06/23/2011
  • The First Torch Singers, Vol. 3: 1935 - 1940
Liner Notes: Although torch songs originated in the 1920s, their true decade was the 1930s—a period in which they flowered then died. Over the years torch songs seemed to became less melodramatic. By the mid to late 1930s, themes of torment were replaced by simple desires for more time with ones lover, pleading for kindness, yearning for a romance or simply savoring moments of happiness. What remained the same with the newer crop of vocalists was a plaintive vocal delivery. Some of the especially soulful performances in this release include Imagination by Bebe Daniels, But Not For Me by Lee Wiley and Moments Like This by Maxene Sullivan. By contrast, Where Are You by Gertrude Niesen echoes an earlier dramatic vocal style. Two of the original torch singers, Ruth Etting and Helen Morgan, were still recording in 1935, but most singers in Volume 3 were only launching their careers at this time and many would be around for years to come. Dinah Shore was still performing on TV until 1992. By the forties, torch songs evolved into love songs of the day and the sentimental vocal styling originated by torch singers was passed on as their contribution to a new generation of singers.
  1. Things Might Have Been So Different... <span class="various">by Ruth Etting</span>
  2. I Was Taken By Storm <span class="various">by Helen Morgan</span>
  3. You`ve Got Me Crying Again... <span class="various">by Connie Boswell</span>
  4. These Foolish Things <span class="various">by Greta Keller</span>
  5. Imagination <span class="various">by Bebe Daniels</span>
  6. Please Be Kind <span class="various">by Frances Langford</span>
  7. If You Should Ever Leave <span class="various">by Mildred Bailey</span>
  8. I Can`t Give You Anything But Love... <span class="various">by Adelaide Hall</span>
  9. That Old Feeling <span class="various">by Alice Faye</span>
  10. I Gotta Right To Sing The Blues... <span class="various">by Ginny Simms</span>
  11. For Sentimental Reasons <span class="various">by Hildegarde</span>
  12. Please Believe Me <span class="various">by Jane Froman</span>
  13. Until The Real Thing Comes Along... <span class="various">by Dixie Lee Crosby</span>
  14. But Not For Me <span class="various">by Lee Wiley</span>
  15. Moments Like This <span class="various">by Maxine Sullivan</span>
  16. Where Are You <span class="various">by Gertrude Niesen</span>
  17. Don`t Mention Love To Me <span class="various">by Kay Thompson</span>
  18. If I Had You <span class="various">by Una Mae Carlisle</span>
  19. All My Life <span class="various">by Helen Ward / Benny Goodman</span>
  20. Careless <span class="various">by Dinah Shore</span>
The First Crooners, Vol. 3: 1935 - 1940 Cover
  • The First Crooners, Vol. 3: 1935 - 1940
  • Big Band
  • Various Artists
  • 06/23/2011
  • The First Crooners, Vol. 3: 1935 - 1940
Liner Notes: From 1935 to 1940 crooning continued unabated and crooners became a dominant force on the musical scene. Bing Crosby was now a celebrated vocal star on radio, the silver screen and as a prolific recording artist. Rudy Vallee had become a major influence on radio and was discovering new talent as host of the of The Fleischmann's Yeast Hour. Promising crooners on the horizon included Bob Crosby, Buddy Clark, Perry Como and Eddy Howard. By the late thirties a new style of popular music called "swing" was becoming the rage, especially with dance bands. While band vocalists were influenced by the swing style, crooners mainly stuck to romantic ballads performed in the usual fashion--demonstrated by You Are Too Beautiful, and Easy To Love. However, I Wonder Who's Kissing Her Now by a young Perry Como is performed with a distinct swing influence. In the 1940s and 1950s, crooners remained popular with occasional challenges by new stylists like Frankie Laine, Johnny Ray or a classically trained star like Mario Lanza. What eventually spelled its doom was a revolutionary new sound called "rock," led by Elvis Presley. Rock attracted a new generation of listeners, yet even Elvis actually crooned some numbers including his revival of the 1920's ballad Are You Lonesome Tonight.
  1. Melody from the Sky <span class="various">by Lee Bennett</span>
  2. Music, Maestro, Please <span class="various">by Al Bowlly</span>
  3. While A Cigarette Was Burning... <span class="various">by Carl Brisson</span>
  4. Two Sleepy People <span class="various">by Chick Bullock</span>
  5. You Are Too Beautiful <span class="various">by Buddy Clark</span>
  6. I Wonder Who`s Kissing Her Now... <span class="various">by Perry Como</span>
  7. Don`t Let That Moon Get Away... <span class="various">by Bing Crosby</span>
  8. Blue Moon <span class="various">by Bob Crosby</span>
  9. This Year`s Kisses <span class="various">by Skinnay Ennis</span>
  10. Easy To Love <span class="various">by Eddy Howard</span>
  11. We Can`t Go On This Way <span class="various">by Nick Lucas</span>
  12. You`re Slightly Terrific <span class="various">by Tony Martin</span>
  13. I Can`t Get Started With You... <span class="various">by Red Mckenzie</span>
  14. In The Still Of The Night <span class="various">by Vaughn Monroe</span>
  15. Midnight Blue <span class="various">by Russ Morgan</span>
  16. September In The Rain <span class="various">by Dick Robertson</span>
  17. I`ll Be Seeing You <span class="various">by Dick Todd</span>
  18. Soon (There`ll Just Be Two Of Us)... <span class="various">by Arthur Tracy</span>
  19. Everything You Said Came True... <span class="various">by Dick Webster</span>
  20. Harbor Lights <span class="various">by Rudy Vallee</span>
Favorites of the Roaring Twenties Cover
  • Favorites of the Roaring Twenties
  • Jazz
  • Various Artists
  • 06/23/2011
  • Favorites of the Roaring Twenties
Liner Notes: The 1920s was perhaps the most colorful and footloose decade in our country's history. This was a period of great social, moral and technological change. Women were first given the right to vote, prohibition ruled the land, radio and talking pictures came into being and aviation took a great step forward when Charles Lindbergh made a solo flight from New York to Paris. Music too was seeing dramatic changes at this time. An exiting new sound called Jazz was first recorded and its influence was quickly felt in both popular music and dance. Tin Pan Alley, the country's song factory, was cranking out one great hit after another thanks to prolific songwriters like Irving Berlin, Jerome Kern, George Gershwin, Cole Porter and Walter Donaldson to name a few. Sadly, the prosperity and exuberance that fueled this colorful decade would end with the stock market crash on October of 1929, the onset to the Great Depression. Provided here are 40 vintage favorites from this period with sample selections from each year. Collectively, they represent the sounds and flavor of that remarkable time. Several have become standards that transcended the 1920s, including Who's Sorry Now?, It Had To Be You, Blue Skies, Singin' In The Rain and Ain't Misbehavin'.
  1. Whispering <span class="various">by Paul Whiteman</span>
  2. Look for the Silver Lining... <span class="various">by Edna Brown And Charles Harrison</span>
  3. All By Myself <span class="various">by Benny Krueger</span>
  4. I`m Nobody`s Baby <span class="various">by Marion Harris</span>
  5. April Showers <span class="various">by Gene Rodemich</span>
  6. Carolina In the Morning <span class="various">by American Quartet</span>
  7. Who`s Sorry Now? <span class="various">by Isham Jones</span>
  8. Charleston <span class="various">by Arthur Gibbs</span>
  9. All Alone <span class="various">by Lewis James</span>
  10. It Had to Be You <span class="various">by Broadway Broadcasters</span>
  11. Nobody`s Sweetheart <span class="various">by Aileen Stanley And Billy Murray</span>
  12. I`ll See You In My Dreams <span class="various">by Isham Jones</span>
  13. Somebody Loves Me <span class="various">by Isabelle Patricola</span>
  14. Remember <span class="various">by John Mc Cormack</span>
  15. Yes Sir That`s My Baby <span class="various">by Ace Brigode</span>
  16. Who? <span class="various">by Harry Archer</span>
  17. If You Knew Susie <span class="various">by Billy Murray</span>
  18. Five Foot Two, Eyes Of Blue... <span class="various">by Irving Kaufman</span>
  19. Baby Face <span class="various">by Ben Selvin</span>
  20. In a Little Spanish Town <span class="various">by Miami Marimba Band</span>
  21. It All Depends On You <span class="various">by Fred Rich</span>
  22. When the Red, Red Robin Comes Bob, Bob, Bobbin` Along... <span class="various">by Ben Selvin</span>
  23. Make Believe <span class="various">by Scrappy Lambert</span>
  24. Blue Skies <span class="various">by Harry Richman</span>
  25. Ramona <span class="various">by Ben Selvin</span>
  26. My Blue Heaven <span class="various">by Don Voorhees</span>
  27. The Varsity Drag <span class="various">by Abe Lyman</span>
  28. Makin` Whoopee! <span class="various">by Eddie Walters</span>
  29. You`re the Cream In My Coffee... <span class="various">by Scrappy Lambert</span>
  30. Together <span class="various">by Frank Munn</span>
  31. That`s My Weakness Now <span class="various">by Helen Kane</span>
  32. She`s Funny That Way <span class="various">by Ted Lewis</span>
  33. Button Up Your Overcoat <span class="various">by Waring`S Pennsylvanians</span>
  34. You Were Meant For Me <span class="various">by The Capitolians</span>
  35. With A Song In My Heart <span class="various">by Franlyn Baur</span>
  36. Singin` In The Rain <span class="various">by Fred Rich Orchestra</span>
  37. Ain`t Misbehavin` <span class="various">by The Charleston Chasers</span>
  38. Tip-Toe Thru' The Tulips With Me... <span class="various">by Nick Lucas</span>
  39. If I Had A Talking Picture Of You... <span class="various">by Earl Burtnett</span>
  40. Happy Days Are Here Again <span class="various">by Johnny Marvin</span>
Wonderful Nonsense : Fun Songs of the Roaring Twenties Cover
  • Wonderful Nonsense : Fun Songs of the Roaring Twenties
  • Jazz
  • Various Artists
  • 06/23/2011
  • Wonderful Nonsense : Fun Songs of the Roaring Twenties
Liner Notes: "Baloney," "Applesauce," "Banana Oil," "Horsefeathers" were all terms meaning nonsense in the 1920s. Featured here are 40 amusing recordings from that period of wonderful nonsense. While fun to hear, this album also provides insights about life in this colorful decade. You may even recognize some of the old standbys like Ain't We Got Fun, and Yes! We Have No Bananas. F. Scott Fitzgerald described the period as "the gaudiest spree in history," which may have been an understatement. Songs like Collegiate Sam portrayed our centers of higher learning as a place for amusement and romance. Numerous selections touch upon the liberation of women, notably Masculine Women! Feminine Men and Mama's Gone Young, Papa's Gone Old. Etiquette Blues pokes fun at Emily Post and her best selling book "Etiquette", and a debunking of innocence is suggested by How Could Red Riding Hood (the first song to be banned on radio). Of course, prohibition does not escape commentary. Leading topics for songs in this collection are food and lovemaking, both high on the scale of human appetites. But fads such as facelifts and diets also receive some attention. Songwriters were keen observers of behavior and the foibles of the "Jazz Age" became an amusing subject for songs.
  1. Ain`t We Got Fun <span class="various">by The Harmonizers</span>
  2. Oh! By Jingo! <span class="various">by Billy Murray</span>
  3. Yes! We Have No Bananas <span class="various">by Benny Krueger</span>
  4. Charley, My Boy <span class="various">by Billy Murray</span>
  5. Barney Google <span class="various">by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare</span>
  6. Stumbling <span class="various">by Frank Crumit</span>
  7. Bringin` Home The Bacon <span class="various">by Billy Jones</span>
  8. It Ain`t Gonna Rain No Mo'... <span class="various">by The Bar Harbor Society Orchestra</span>
  9. Pardon Me (While I Laugh) <span class="various">by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare</span>
  10. Don`t Bring Lulu <span class="various">by Bennie Krueger</span>
  11. Where`d You Get Those Eyes?... <span class="various">by Abe Lyman</span>
  12. Lenore <span class="various">by Ernest Hare</span>
  13. Tonight`s My Night With Baby... <span class="various">by Irving Kaufman</span>
  14. I`m Just Wild About Animal Crackers... <span class="various">by Irving Aaronson</span>
  15. There`s A Trick In Pickin` A Chick Chick Chicken... <span class="various">by California Melody Orchestra</span>
  16. My Cutie`s Due At Two To Two... <span class="various">by Billy Jones & Ernest Hare</span>
  17. If My Baby Cooks (As Good As She Looks)... <span class="various">by Harry Reser</span>
  18. No Wonder She`s A Blushing Bride... <span class="various">by Jim Miller & Charlie Farrell</span>
  19. She`s The Sweetheart Of Six Other Guys... <span class="various">by Fred "Sugar" Hall</span>
  20. I Love The College Girls <span class="various">by Fred Waring`S Pennsylvanians</span>
  21. Gonna Get A Girl <span class="various">by The Six Jumping Jacks</span>
  22. Masculine Women! Feminine Men!... <span class="various">by Irving Kaufman</span>
  23. Hard To Get Gertie <span class="various">by Jane Green</span>
  24. Ever Since The Movies Learned To Talk... <span class="various">by Billy Murray</span>
  25. (Every Night I Bring Her) Frankfurter Sandwiches... <span class="various">by Al Lentz</span>
  26. Red Lips Kiss My Blues Away... <span class="various">by Aileen Stanley & Johnny Marvin</span>
  27. Crazy Words Crazy Tune <span class="various">by Vaughn De Leath</span>
  28. I`ve Never Seen A Straight Banana... <span class="various">by Fred Waring`S Pennsylvanians</span>
  29. I Faw Down And Go Boom <span class="various">by Dick Robertson</span>
  30. How Could Red Riding Hood <span class="various">by The Yacht Club Boys</span>
  31. Pasta Fazoola <span class="various">by Van & Schenck</span>
  32. It`s A Million To One You`re In Love... <span class="various">by Franklyn Baur</span>
  33. (Does She Love Me?) Positively Absolutely... <span class="various">by Aileen Stanley & Billy Murray</span>
  34. Etiquette Blues <span class="various">by Mona Motor Oil Twins</span>
  35. I Never See Maggie Alone <span class="various">by Irving Aaronson</span>
  36. Hungry Women <span class="various">by Eddie Cantor</span>
  37. Tain`t No Sin (To Dance Around In Your Bones)... <span class="various">by George Olsen</span>
  38. Mama`s Gone Young - Papa`s Gone Old... <span class="various">by Ed Lowry</span>
  39. Collegiate Sam <span class="various">by Eddie Walters</span>
  40. My Wife Is On A Diet <span class="various">by Billy Murray & Walter Scanlon</span>
Legendary Voices of Vaudeville Cover
  • Legendary Voices of Vaudeville
  • Pop
  • Various Artists
  • 06/24/2011
  • Legendary Voices of Vaudeville
Liner Notes: It is hard to overstate the importance of vaudeville as a source of entertainment during its heyday. It was today's equivalent to radio, TV, films, the Internet and comedy clubs all rolled up in one. Actually, it was the introduction of radio and talking pictures as rival sources of entertainment that led to vaudevilles' eventual demise. Vaudeville was another term for variety with acts such as acrobats, jugglers, magicians, midgets, animal acts, dancers, comedians, bands and singers. These acts criss-crossed the country to appear on bills in vaudeville houses (Theatres) that were prevalent in towns and cities throughout the nation. As most types of vaudeville acts were entirely visual, this CD is limited to singers, instrumentals and dialog where sound is available. Artists presented here were major attractions and all represent for the sounds of vaudeville. Many like Nora Bayes, Elsie Janis, Sophie Tucker, Harry Lauder, Belle Baker and Van & Schenck were headliners. We have chosen selections that give the feel of a live stage performance and some are from actual vaudeville acts on early sound shorts. These include Be Your Age, I Wonder Who's Kissing Her Now, Love Baby and Strum My Blues Away.
  1. You Won't Do Any Business If You Haven't Got A Band... <span class="various">by George M. Cohan</span>
  2. Turn Off Your Light, Mr. Moon Man... <span class="various">by Nora Bayes & Jack Norworth</span>
  3. Saving Up Coupons For Mother... <span class="various">by Nat Wills</span>
  4. The Darktown Strutters' Ball... <span class="various">by Elsie Janis</span>
  5. You Can't Get Away From It... <span class="various">by Bert Williams</span>
  6. All By Myself <span class="various">by Flo Bert</span>
  7. I'm Going Way Back Home And Have A Wonderful Time... <span class="various">by Avon Comedy Four</span>
  8. Vampin' Sal (The Sheba Of Georgia)... <span class="various">by Sophie Tucker</span>
  9. Positively Mr. Gallagher- Absolutely Mr. Shean... <span class="various">by Gallagher & Shean</span>
  10. Sweet Indiana Home <span class="various">by Marion Harris</span>
  11. Tomorrow <span class="various">by Margaret Young</span>
  12. Lovey Came Back <span class="various">by Lou Holtz</span>
  13. ' Way Down Yonder In New Orleans... <span class="various">by Blossom Seeley</span>
  14. After The Opera <span class="various">by Willie & Eugene Howard</span>
  15. If I Can't Get The Sweetie I Want... <span class="various">by Miss Patricola</span>
  16. Nobody's Child <span class="various">by Georgie Price</span>
  17. Hotsy Totsy Town <span class="various">by Ruth Roye</span>
  18. Roamin' In The Gloamin <span class="various">by Sir Harry Lauder</span>
  19. Red Head! & Be Your Age <span class="various">by Irene Franklin</span>
  20. Goodbye, My Lady Love & I Wonder Who's Kissing Her Now... <span class="various">by Joseph E. Howard</span>
  21. Magnolia <span class="various">by Van & Schenck</span>
  22. Let's Talk About My Sweetie... <span class="various">by Peggy English</span>
  23. Headin' Home (Bound for Birmingham)... <span class="various">by Wendell Hall</span>
  24. Love Baby <span class="various">by Harry Fox With Beatrice Curtis</span>
  25. Alexander's Ragtime Band <span class="various">by Ted Lewis</span>
  26. Looking At The World Thru' Rose Colored Glasses... <span class="various">by Aileen Stanley</span>
  27. If You Want The Rainbow (You Must Have The Rain)... <span class="various">by Mel Klee</span>
  28. Baby Your Mother (Like She Babied You)... <span class="various">by Belle Baker</span>
  29. Can Broadway Do Without Me?... <span class="various">by Clayton & Jackson & Durante</span>
  30. Mine All Mine <span class="various">by Jane Green</span>
  31. The Day I Marry You <span class="various">by Eddie Foy Jr.</span>
  32. I Ain't That Kind Of A Baby... <span class="various">by Esther Walker</span>
  33. That's What Puts The "Sweet" In Home Sweet Home... <span class="various">by Ed Lowry</span>
  34. I'll Tell The World (You're All The World To Me)... <span class="various">by Cora Green</span>
  35. There Must Be A Silver Lining... <span class="various">by Larry Rich</span>
  36. It Must Be An Old Spanish Custom... <span class="various">by Duncan Sisters</span>
  37. I Just Roll Along (Havin' My Ups And Downs)... <span class="various">by Harry Richman</span>
  38. The Blues Singer From Alabam... <span class="various">by Bessie Brown</span>
  39. Strum My Blues Away & A Little Music In The Moonlight... <span class="various">by Johnny Marvin</span>
  40. Come Out Come Out Wherever You Are... <span class="various">by Baby Rose Marie</span>
The Wonderful 30s Cover
  • The Wonderful 30s
  • Pop
  • Various Artists
  • 06/24/2011
  • The Wonderful 30s
Liner Notes: If the 1920's started out with a bang, the 30's began with a whimper. The stock market crash brought about the loss of personal fortunes, bank failures, foreclosures on homes and farms and failure of businesses. The net result was widespread unemployment, homelessness and despair. Amidst this turbulence, the decade enjoyed a golden age of popular music. Record sales drastically declined during the Great Depression and many labels failed. However, the 50 titles included here comprise a virtual hit parade of songs that survived the decade. While life was not always wonderful at that time, the music and records left to posterity certainly were. Most artists in this set were recording in the 1920's, yet their style evolved with the sounds of the new decade. Many bouncy swing tunes included here give no sense of the turmoil facing the nation. To the contrary, listening to songs like On The Sunny Side Of The Street, With Plenty Of Money And You and I've Got A Pocketful Of Dreams suggest a carefree time. This was probably no accident. Both Tin Pan Alley and Hollywood conspired to create songs and films that would help ease the public's pain, at least for a while. This set ends with All The Things You Are, considered by many to be among the most perfect pop songs ever written.
  1. Three Little Words <span class="various">by Frank Crumit</span>
  2. On The Sunny Side Of The Street... <span class="various">by Grace Hayes</span>
  3. Embraceable You <span class="various">by Fred Rich</span>
  4. You're Driving Me Crazy! <span class="various">by Gene Austin</span>
  5. Nevertheless <span class="various">by Gus Arnheim</span>
  6. Body And Soul <span class="various">by Helen Morgan</span>
  7. You're My Everything <span class="various">by Ben Selvin</span>
  8. Please <span class="various">by Sam Coslow</span>
  9. I Don't Know Why (I Just Do)... <span class="various">by Kate Smith</span>
  10. My Baby Just Cares For Me <span class="various">by Ted Weems</span>
  11. (There Ought To Be A) Moonlight Saving Time... <span class="various">by Gus Amheim</span>
  12. Don't Blame Me <span class="various">by Joseph Wagstaff</span>
  13. Night And Day <span class="various">by Fred Astaire</span>
  14. Did You Ever See A Dream Walking?... <span class="various">by Bing Crosby</span>
  15. Soft Light And Sweet Music... <span class="various">by Eddy Duchin</span>
  16. In A Shanty In Old Shanty Town... <span class="various">by Belle Baker</span>
  17. Smoke Gets In Your Eyes <span class="various">by Victor Salon Orchestra</span>
  18. All I Do Is Dream Of You <span class="various">by Freddy Martin</span>
  19. Easter Parade <span class="various">by Meyer Davis</span>
  20. Stormy Weather <span class="various">by Ethel Waters</span>
  21. A Little Bit Independent <span class="various">by Fats Waller</span>
  22. I Only Have Eyes For You <span class="various">by Anson Weeks</span>
  23. Carioca <span class="various">by Castillan Troubadours</span>
  24. Out In The Cold Again <span class="various">by Ruth Etting</span>
  25. The Way You Look Tonight <span class="various">by Guy Lombardo</span>
  26. Just One Of Those Things <span class="various">by Nat Brandywynne</span>
  27. Easy To Love <span class="various">by Francis Langford</span>
  28. With My Eyes Wide Open I'm Dreaming... <span class="various">by Isham Jones</span>
  29. You Can't Pull The Wool Over My Eyes... <span class="various">by Perry Como</span>
  30. Thanks A Million <span class="various">by Morton Downey</span>
  31. With Plenty Of Money And You... <span class="various">by Frank Dailey</span>
  32. Zing! Went The Strings Of My Heart... <span class="various">by Ruth Etting</span>
  33. Isn't This A Lovely Day? <span class="various">by Phil Ohman</span>
  34. Pennies From Heaven <span class="various">by Hildegarde</span>
  35. The Lady Is A Tramp <span class="various">by Sophie Tucker</span>
  36. That Old Feeling <span class="various">by Guy Lombardo</span>
  37. This Year's Kisses <span class="various">by Dick Powell</span>
  38. I've Got My Love To Keep Me Warm... <span class="various">by Hildegarde</span>
  39. Boo Hoo <span class="various">by Russ Morgan</span>
  40. Heaven Help This Heart Of Mine... <span class="various">by Mildred Bailey</span>
  41. South American Way <span class="various">by Carmen Miranda</span>
  42. It Looks Like Rain In Cherry Blossom Lane... <span class="various">by Guy Lombardo</span>
  43. Says My Heart <span class="various">by Ozzie Nelson & Harriet Hilliard</span>
  44. Jeepers Creepers <span class="various">by Ethel Waters</span>
  45. You Must Have Been A Beautiful Baby... <span class="various">by Chick Bullock</span>
  46. Beer Barrel Polka <span class="various">by Glahe Musette Orchestra</span>
  47. Deep Purple <span class="various">by Larry Clinton</span>
  48. I've Got A Pocketful Of Dreams... <span class="various">by Russ Morgan</span>
  49. Two Sleepy People <span class="various">by Ella Logan & Hoagy Carmichael</span>
  50. All The Things You Are <span class="various">by Kenny Baker</span>
Hawaiian Memories Cover
  • Hawaiian Memories
  • Pop
  • Various Artists
  • 06/24/2011
  • Hawaiian Memories
Liner Notes: This collection covers the years from 1928 to 1941, just prior to the attack on Pearl Harbor. In the 1930s, travel to this sparsely populated destination was by steamship, a form of travel for the affluent—especially during those depression years. Only a handful of hotels graced Waikiki at the time, among them the luxurious Royal Hawaiian Hotel. This hotel called, "The Pink Palace," dominated a barren landscape. Today it is virtually lost in the shadow of surrounding high rises. In 1934 Harry Owens, a young Nebraskan, became the resident bandleader at the Royal Hawaiian. During his tenure there he achieved great fame for his polished arrangements as well as a composer of many hits, including Hawaiian Paradise and Sweet Leilani which earned him an Oscar in 1938. Travel to the islands was not required to enjoy live Hawaiian music. Eddie Bush was a native of Los Angeles. Others like Sol Hoopi, and Andy Iona left Hawaii for more lucrative work in Hollywood in nightclubs and movie studios. Dick and Lani McIntire also performed in The States. Lani wrote the touching ballad The One Rose which he sings here with the Dick McIntire group. Also on the mainland was Ray Kinney an appealing tenor who can be heard on several recordings including To You Sweetheart, Aloha, another Harry Owens' hit.
  1. Blue Hawaii <span class="various">by Bing Crosby</span>
  2. Malihini Mele <span class="various">by South Sea Islanders</span>
  3. My Little Grass Shack In Kealakekua, Hawaii... <span class="various">by Eddie Bush`S Biltmore Trio</span>
  4. I`ve Been Dreaming Of A Little Girl Like You... <span class="various">by Johnny Noble`S Hawaiians</span>
  5. Ta-Hu-Wa-Hu-Wa-I (Hawaiian War Chant)... <span class="various">by Andy Iona</span>
  6. Along The Way To Waikiki <span class="various">by Harry Owens</span>
  7. Dusky Polynesian <span class="various">by Ray Kinney</span>
  8. Hilo Hattie Does The Hilo Hop... <span class="various">by Clara Inter (Hilo Hattie)</span>
  9. It Happened In Kaloha <span class="various">by Harry Owens</span>
  10. Hano Hano Hanalei <span class="various">by Mike Hanapi</span>
  11. Sweet Leilani <span class="various">by Dick Mc Intire`S Harmony Hawaiians</span>
  12. Kaneohe Hula <span class="various">by Ray Kinney</span>
  13. I Wonder Where My Little Hula Girl Has Gone... <span class="various">by Sol K. Bright</span>
  14. On The Beach At Waikiki <span class="various">by Moana Serenaders</span>
  15. Tomi Tomi <span class="various">by Harry Owens</span>
  16. Aloha Ia No O Maui (The Island Of Maui Hula)... <span class="various">by Tony Martin</span>
  17. Lovely Hula Hands <span class="various">by Ray Kinney</span>
  18. Hawaiian Smiles <span class="various">by Waikiki Swingsters</span>
  19. Maui Girl <span class="various">by Andy Iona</span>
  20. The One Rose (That`s Left In My Heart)... <span class="various">by Dick Mc Intire</span>
  21. In Waikiki <span class="various">by Frances Langford With Dick Mc Intire</span>
  22. My Hula Lady <span class="various">by Ray Kinney With Dick Mc Intire</span>
  23. Honey, Let`s Go For Broke (Pau Pilika)... <span class="various">by Harry Owens</span>
  24. I Like You <span class="various">by Sol Hoopi</span>
  25. Hawaiian Paradise <span class="various">by Andy Iona</span>
  26. Analani E <span class="various">by Ray Kinney</span>
  27. Hilo March <span class="various">by Dick Mc Intire</span>
  28. Ukulele Lady <span class="various">by Clara Inter (Hilo Hattie)</span>
  29. Ke Kali Nei Au (Waiting For Thee)... <span class="various">by Ray Kinney</span>
  30. Hula Girl <span class="various">by Sol Hoopi</span>
  31. Song Of The Islands (Na Lei O Hawaii)... <span class="various">by Harry Owen</span>
  32. To You Sweetheart, Aloha <span class="various">by Ray Kinney</span>
  33. Dreamy Hawaiian Moon <span class="various">by Harry Owens</span>
  34. On A Cocoanut Island <span class="various">by Louis Armstrong</span>
  35. King Kamehameha <span class="various">by Sol Hoopi</span>
  36. Tropic Trade Winds <span class="various">by Sol K. Bright</span>
  37. Hula Breeze <span class="various">by Harry Owens</span>
  38. Little Brown Gal <span class="various">by Ray Kinney</span>
  39. Ebb Tide <span class="various">by Sam Koki</span>
  40. Aloha Oe (Farewell To Thee)... <span class="various">by Harry Owens</span>
Latin Sounds of the Past Cover
  • Latin Sounds of the Past
  • Latin
  • Various Artists
  • 06/24/2011
  • Latin Sounds of the Past
Liner Notes: This collection focuses on what might be called the "Latin Invasion"-- a period from the late 1920's to the early 1940's when Latin sounds took this country by storm. Popular songs from Cuba, Mexico, Central America, Brazil and Argentina became an integral part of our own musical experience The tango was one of the early Latin rhythms to reach this country. El Choclo, a familiar tango, was later revived with English lyrics as The Kiss Of Fire. While not the first Latin song to be recorded here, it was a Cuban composition called El Manisero, known as The Peanut Vendor that ignited the Latin craze. This number and other Cuban records such as the energetic Rumba Panama and the Conga Ay Si, Ay No are included in this set. Carmen Miranda helped bring Brazilian music to our shores. Miss Seratoa is one of her early Brazilian recordings from 1930. Later, Miranda was lured to New York to appear in Streets Of Paris in which she sang Mama Eu Quero. However, we look to Mexico for some of the most beautifully crafted romantic ballads in this collection. These include Frenesi, Solamente Una Vez, known here as You Belong To My Heart and Amor intimately performed by Ramon Armengod.
  1. The Peanut Vendor <span class="various">by Don Azpiazu</span>
  2. Green Eyes <span class="various">by Don Azpiazu</span>
  3. Te Fuiste <span class="various">by Victor Argentine Orchestra</span>
  4. Miss Seratoa <span class="various">by Carmen Miranda</span>
  5. Canto Siboney <span class="various">by Alfredo Brito</span>
  6. Ay Mama Inez <span class="various">by Pan American Marimba Band</span>
  7. Adios Linda Morena (Adios)... <span class="various">by Enric Madriguera</span>
  8. Carioca <span class="various">by Pedro Via</span>
  9. El Choclo <span class="various">by International Novelty Orchestra</span>
  10. Marianna (The Peanut Vendor`s Daughter)... <span class="various">by Don Azpiazu</span>
  11. Karabali <span class="various">by Ernesto Lecuona</span>
  12. Negra Consentida <span class="various">by Alina De Silva</span>
  13. Isle Of Capri <span class="various">by Xavier Cugat</span>
  14. Jarabe Tapatio (Mexican Hat Dance)... <span class="various">by Blue Bird Orchestra</span>
  15. Alla En El Rancho Grande <span class="various">by Emilio Caceres</span>
  16. Perfidia <span class="various">by Lupita Palomera</span>
  17. Amapola <span class="various">by The Castillians</span>
  18. Quiereme Mucho (Yours) <span class="various">by Victor Cuban Orchestra</span>
  19. Para Vigo Me Voy <span class="various">by Xavier Cugat</span>
  20. No Me Vengas A Decir <span class="various">by Hermanas Padilla (Padilla Sisters)</span>
  21. La Cucaracha <span class="various">by Pan American Marimba Band</span>
  22. La Cumparsita <span class="various">by Carlos Molina's Tango Orchestra</span>
  23. Flores Negras <span class="various">by Pedro Vargas</span>
  24. Rumba Blanca <span class="various">by Lecuona Cuban Boys</span>
  25. Desesperanza <span class="various">by Hermanas Padilla (Padilla Sisters)</span>
  26. Tico-Tico No Fuba (Tico-Tico)... <span class="various">by Colbaz Orchestra</span>
  27. Granada <span class="various">by Pedro Vargas</span>
  28. Begin The Beguine <span class="various">by Nano Rodrigo</span>
  29. Panama <span class="various">by Castro Brothers</span>
  30. Por Ultima Vez <span class="various">by Juan S. Garrido</span>
  31. Mama Eu Quero (I Want My Mama)... <span class="various">by Carmen Miranda</span>
  32. Ay Si, Ay No <span class="various">by Lecuona Cuban Boys</span>
  33. Frenesi <span class="various">by Adelina Garcia</span>
  34. Tropicana <span class="various">by Aaron Gonzales Tango Orchestra</span>
  35. Mexicali Rose <span class="various">by Flores & Valdez</span>
  36. Cachita <span class="various">by Casino De Playa Orchestra</span>
  37. Jalousie <span class="various">by Xavier Cugat</span>
  38. Solamente Una Vez (You Belong To My Heart)... <span class="various">by Manuelita Arriola</span>
  39. Aurora <span class="various">by Pan American Marimba Band</span>
  40. Amor <span class="various">by Ramon Armengod</span>
Voices of Romance Cover
  • Voices of Romance
  • Pop
  • Various Artists
  • 06/25/2011
  • Voices of Romance
Liner Notes: In the 1930's a growing film and radio industry was reaching a wide audience and promoting love songs to a receptive public. An increasing number of vocal artists from these media became known for romantic ballads. Love songs continued to be the traditional stock in trade for both the crooners and torch singers, but artists with trained voices were also making these tender ballads a part of their repertoire. Tenors, in particular, won the ladies hearts including Frank Parker with Sweet And Lovely, Frank Munn (The Golden Voice Of Radio) with As Time Goes By and Kenny Baker with Dinner At Eight. Others like Nino Martini, Lawrence Tibbett, Jan Peerce and James Melton who performed popular love songs included here would become famous as opera stars. Jeanette Macdonald and Nelson Eddy gained fame as amorous partners on the silver screen. Women vocalists were also important purveyors of love songs and this album offers several fine examples like Love Letters In The Sand by Lee Morse, Moonglow by Ethel Waters, What About Me by Ruth Etting and The Touch Of Your Lips by Hildegarde. We hail them all as the Voices of Romance.
  1. One Hour With You <span class="various">by Morton Downey</span>
  2. When You`re In Love <span class="various">by Russ Columbo</span>
  3. Out Of Nowhere <span class="various">by Ruth Etting</span>
  4. Midnight In Paris <span class="various">by Nino Martini</span>
  5. That`s My Desire <span class="various">by Nick Lucas</span>
  6. Love Letters In The Sand <span class="various">by Lee Morse</span>
  7. Sweet And Lovely <span class="various">by Frank Parker</span>
  8. Blue Moon <span class="various">by Connie Boswell</span>
  9. As Time Goes By <span class="various">by Frank Munn</span>
  10. The Day You Came Along <span class="various">by Conrad Thibault</span>
  11. Lovely To Look At <span class="various">by Irene Dunne</span>
  12. There`s Danger In Your Eyes Cherie... <span class="various">by James Melton</span>
  13. I`ll See You Again <span class="various">by Olga Medolgo Albani</span>
  14. I Wished On The Moon <span class="various">by Lanny Ross</span>
  15. Isn`t It Romantic <span class="various">by Jeanette Macdonald</span>
  16. Cuban Love Song <span class="various">by Lawrence Tibbett</span>
  17. P. S. I Love You <span class="various">by Jack Fulton</span>
  18. I Just Couldn`t Take It, Baby... <span class="various">by Ethel Waters / Benny Goodman</span>
  19. Love Me Tonight <span class="various">by Art Jarrett</span>
  20. The Glory Of Love <span class="various">by Hildegarde</span>
  21. My Romance <span class="various">by Jan Peerce</span>
  22. I Only Have Eyes For You <span class="various">by Phil Regan</span>
  23. Moonglow <span class="various">by Ethel Waters</span>
  24. It`s Love I`m After <span class="various">by Tony Martin</span>
  25. It`s Easy To Remember <span class="various">by Arthur Tracy</span>
  26. When I Grow Too Old To Dream... <span class="various">by Gracie Fields</span>
  27. Dinner At Eight <span class="various">by Art Jarrett</span>
  28. Love Walked In <span class="various">by Kenny Baker</span>
  29. What About Me <span class="various">by Ruth Etting</span>
  30. With Every Breath I Take <span class="various">by Harry Richman</span>
  31. I`ve Got My Love To Keep Me Warm... <span class="various">by Dick Powell</span>
  32. Once In A While <span class="various">by Frances Langford</span>
  33. I`m In The Mood For Love <span class="various">by Lanny Ross</span>
  34. First Love <span class="various">by Jessica Dragonette</span>
  35. Where Am I (Am I In Heaven)?... <span class="various">by James Melton</span>
  36. The Touch Of Your Lips <span class="various">by Hildegarde</span>
  37. Dancing In The Dark <span class="various">by Don Novis</span>
  38. I`m Falling In Love With Someone... <span class="various">by Nelson Eddy</span>
  39. You`re A Sweetheart <span class="various">by Kate Smith</span>
  40. In The Middle Of A Kiss <span class="various">by Morton Downey</span>
Echoes from the 1920s Cover
  • Echoes from the 1920s
  • Pop
  • Various Artists
  • 06/25/2011
  • Echoes from the 1920s
Liner Notes: This second 1920's collection is a companion piece to our earlier release Favorites Of The 1920's and provides more enticing tunes from the Jazz Age. The songs contained here are quintessential 1920's numbers that offer interesting observations about that era. This is especially true for Running Wild which says it all, "Running wild, lost control. Running wild, mighty bold. Feeling gay, reckless too." What better way to describe this decade? Two Prohibition songs, I'll See You In C-U-B-A and Hello Montreal comment on our willingness to leave the country to enjoy legal booze elsewhere—which hardly seemed necessary with all the bootleg liquor available here. Henry's Made A Lady Out Of Lizzie pokes fun at Henry Ford who continued making the hopelessly out-of-date "Tin Lizzie" (Model T) for years and reluctantly introduced the modern Model A only after a drastic decline in sales. Even Ford's anti-Semitism does not escape attention in this song. In contrast, Lucky Lindy celebrates Charles Lindbergh's heroic solo flight from New York to Paris. As one might expect, several popular love songs are included in this collection given that this was an age of sexual liberation. Songs like Bye Bye Blackbird and I'm Looking Over A Four Leaf Clover capture the undying optimism of the twenties.
  1. I`ll See You In C-U-B-A <span class="various">by Billy Murray</span>
  2. Margie <span class="various">by Ben Selvin</span>
  3. Palesteena <span class="various">by Original Dixieland Jazz Band</span>
  4. Ma! (He`s Making Eyes At Me)... <span class="various">by Billy Jones</span>
  5. Chicago <span class="various">by Aileen Stanley</span>
  6. Blue (And Broken Hearted) <span class="various">by The Virginians</span>
  7. Runnin` Wild <span class="various">by Miss Patricola</span>
  8. That Old Gang Of Mine <span class="various">by Benny Krueger</span>
  9. Mexicali Rose <span class="various">by Bar Harbor Society Orchestra</span>
  10. There`ll Be Some Changes Made... <span class="various">by Marion Harris</span>
  11. Last Night On The Back Porch... <span class="various">by Carl Fenton</span>
  12. Lazy <span class="various">by Al Jolson</span>
  13. I Love My Baby <span class="various">by Lee Morse</span>
  14. Sleepy Time Gal <span class="various">by Art Landry</span>
  15. I Wonder Where My Baby Is Tonight... <span class="various">by Ben Selvin</span>
  16. My Bundle Of Love <span class="various">by Gene Austin</span>
  17. Deed I Do <span class="various">by Ben Pollack</span>
  18. After I Say I`m Sorry <span class="various">by Jean Goldkette</span>
  19. I`d Love To Call You My Sweetheart... <span class="various">by Nick Lucas</span>
  20. Sunday <span class="various">by Abe Lyman</span>
  21. Bye Bye Blackbird <span class="various">by George Olsen</span>
  22. There Ain`t No Maybe There In My Baby`s Eyes... <span class="various">by Harry Archer</span>
  23. Are You Lonesome Tonight? <span class="various">by Frank Munn</span>
  24. Miss Annabelle Lee <span class="various">by Al Goering</span>
  25. Keep Sweeping The Cobwebs Off The Moon... <span class="various">by Ruth Etting</span>
  26. Lucky Lindy <span class="various">by Irving Kaufman</span>
  27. I`m Looking Over A Four Leaf Clover... <span class="various">by Gene Goldkette</span>
  28. I Can`t Believe That You`re In Love With Me... <span class="various">by Johnny Marvin</span>
  29. Ain`t That A Grand And Glorious Feeling... <span class="various">by Troubadours</span>
  30. Me And My Shadow <span class="various">by Helen Morgan</span>
  31. How About Me? <span class="various">by Fred Waring's Pennsylvanians</span>
  32. Hello Montreal <span class="various">by The Jazz Pilots</span>
  33. Henry`s Made A Lady Out Of Lizzie... <span class="various">by Beth Challis</span>
  34. Dream Train <span class="various">by Nat Shilkret</span>
  35. A Precious Little Thing Called Love... <span class="various">by Irving Kaufman</span>
  36. Am I Blue? <span class="various">by Libby Holman</span>
  37. I`ve Got A Feeling I`m Falling... <span class="various">by Jesse Crawford</span>
  38. Glad Rag Doll <span class="various">by Jack Smith</span>
  39. Miss You <span class="various">by Meyer Davis</span>
  40. Sunny Side Up <span class="various">by Chick Endor</span>
Ray Noble: Love Is the Sweetest Thing Cover
  • Ray Noble: Love Is the Sweetest Thing
  • Pop
  • Various Artists
  • 06/27/2011
  • Ray Noble: Love Is the Sweetest Thing
Liner Notes: Ray Noble was born in Brighton, England in 1903. He learned to play piano as a child and during his teens was given lessons in orchestration. Noble's skill for arranging impressed Jack Payne, bandleader for the BBC, who hired Noble as his arranger. Noble began recording on the HMV label as the director on the Mayfair Orchestra and was soon given label credit under his own name. From 1929 to 1934 Noble made over 500 records for HMV, also released in the U.S.A. on Victor. Noble wrote many hit songs, four of which are provided here. His classic Goodnight Sweetheart completes this album. In late 1934, Noble, his wife Gladys, his manager and Al Bowlly, Noble's long time vocalist, came to the States, and started arranging for Paramount Studios. In early 1935 he formed a new band with several respected jazz musicians such as Charlie Spivac, Glenn Miller, Will Bradley, Bud Freeman and Claude Thornhill. In 1935 the band had its first recording session—cutting 7 songs including Soon. During 1935-36, Noble made many others including Top Hat. Noble was also featured on radio as a prominent bandleader for both the Burns & Allen show and the popular Charlie McCarthy program, but his lasting legacy remains his wonderful compositions and prolific recordings.
  1. Love Is The Sweetest Thing... <span class="various">by Al Bowlly</span>
  2. Let`s Face The Music And Dance... <span class="various">by Al Bowlly</span>
  3. Dinner For One, Please, James... <span class="various">by Al Bowlly</span>
  4. Big Chief De Sota <span class="various">by Stirling Bose & Al Bowlly</span>
  5. Soon <span class="various">by Al Bowlly</span>
  6. Top Hat <span class="various">by Al Bowlly & The Freshmen</span>
  7. Why Dream? <span class="various">by Al Bowlly</span>
  8. Double Trouble <span class="various">by The Freshmen & Ray Noble</span>
  9. The Piccolino <span class="various">by Al Bowlly</span>
  10. Yours Truly Is Truly Yours... <span class="various">by Al Bowlly</span>
  11. After All, You`re All I`m After... <span class="various">by Al Bowlly</span>
  12. I Wished On The Moon <span class="various">by Al Bowlly</span>
  13. One, Two, Button Your Shoe... <span class="various">by Al Bowlly</span>
  14. Where Am I? (Am I In Heaven?)... <span class="various">by Al Bowlly</span>
  15. Little Old Lady <span class="various">by Al Bowlly</span>
  16. Let`s Swing It <span class="various">by The Freshmen</span>
  17. If You Love Me <span class="various">by Al Bowlly</span>
  18. The Touch Of Your Lips <span class="various">by Al Bowlly</span>
  19. The Very Thought Of You <span class="various">by Al Bowlly</span>
  20. Dinah <span class="various">by Ray Noble</span>
  21. Easy To Love <span class="various">by Al Bowlly</span>
  22. Little Dutch Mill <span class="various">by Al Bowlly</span>
  23. There`s Something In The Air... <span class="various">by Al Bowlly</span>
  24. Slumming On Park Avenue <span class="various">by The Merry Macs & Ray Noble</span>
  25. Let Yourself Go <span class="various">by Al Bowlly & The Freshmen</span>
  26. Now <span class="various">by Al Bowlly</span>
  27. I`ve Got You Under My Skin... <span class="various">by Al Bowlly</span>
  28. I Hadn`t Anyone Till You <span class="various">by Tony Martin</span>
  29. St. Louis Blues <span class="various">by Al Bowlly</span>
  30. I`ve Got My Love To Keep Me Warm... <span class="various">by Howard Phillips</span>
  31. You`re So Desirable <span class="various">by Howard Phillips</span>
  32. She Loves Me Not <span class="various">by Al Bowlly</span>
  33. I`ll Never Smile Again <span class="various">by Larry Stewart</span>
  34. Sleepy Time Gal <span class="various">by Larry Stewart</span>
  35. Linda <span class="various">by Buddy Clark & Anita Gordon</span>
  36. Goodnight, Sweetheart <span class="various">by Al Bowlly</span>