Part 2: The Melting Iceberg Syndrome, The Music Business And The Change Under The Couch Cushions

By Jeff Price

On the other hand…perhaps, since the beginning of the music business, more artists are earning some money for the first time as opposed to a few earning less.

In the old school model, an artist got signed to a label.  The label would agree to pay the artist a negotiated royalty rate on each CD sold; usually around $1.40 to $1.70 per album. The label would then advance the artist band royalties from their “to-be-earned-in-the-future-CD-sales.”  The artist would  take this money (their own royalty money) and use most of it to record the album that the label would own and control.

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Arrested (Artist) Development

By Jeff Price

Sometime in the 90’s, “artist development” for rock and alternative bands, got turned on its head.  Gone were the days of a major label aspiring to propel an artist over many years to “rock legend” with multiple releases, tour dates, interviews and in-store appearances (Led Zep, Rolling Stones, Springsteen, The Byrds etc). Instead, new artists were given six weeks from the street date of their debut album to have a radio/MTV hit.  If the first single from the album failed, the artist would typically get dropped; their career effectively over before it even began.

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