TuneCore Teams Up With HOT 97 For Who’s Next Showcase

If you’re a fan of hip hop, you have an understanding of the role New York City has played and continues to play in hip hop  culture. Between being the home of the genre and producing some of the finest artists to do it, everyone knows the Big Apple is a place to pay your dues and get heard. (Don’t worry – TuneCore knows that great hip hop can come from all corners of the world – that’s why we help you get it out there!)

Just as undeniable in terms of influence and importance are some of the institutions associated with hip hop in New York City, including the legendary HOT 97 radio station. That’s why we’re proud as ever to be partnering with HOT 97 in order to give TuneCore Artists a chance to perform at their “Who’s Next” monthly showcase concerts! Each month’s event will occur at the similarly legendary S.O.B.’s in lower Manhattan.

Known as an event that can break upcoming artists, talent like J Cole, Drake and Ty Dolla $ign have graced the Who’s Next stage. Music Director TT Torrez is leading the re-launched showcase and we’re super excited to be able to offer TuneCore Artists the chance to be included. With TuneCore being a leader in the digital distribution space for independent artists, it only makes sense that we’d support a platform encouraging up-and-comers to get heard and seen by fans and industry folks.

Want to be considered? Log into Facebook, head over to HOT 97’s Messenger, and click ‘Get Started’. From there, you’ll have the option to submit a track – just follow the instructions and you’ll be good to go.

HOT 97’s music department will carefully listen to the top tracks rated by fans on the ‘Song Leaderboard’ and will select the artist to perform on the Who’s Next stage at S.O.B.’s.

Read more about HOT 97’s Who’s Next showcase series here.

If you’re in New York this month, be sure to check out TuneCore Artist Devvon Terrell performing at HOT 97 Who’s Next on Tuesday, October 24th. Tickets here.

August Industry Wrap-Up

Spotify Begins Testing Videos Within Playlists


It’s amazing to think about the progress that streaming platforms have made over recent years. Streaming itself was and is a groundbreaking way to listen to music digitally, but one can even point to the amazing influential powers of playlists as an example of how quickly the way fans discover music and engage with their favorite artist changes. Any independent artist who has been added to a higher profile playlist will likely be able to tell you about the positive impact it has on their career, too.

This month, Spotify – which also announced that it has surpassed 60 million subscribers – officially rolled out the inclusion of videos within its incredibly popular “Rap Caviar” playlist (it began testing this feature in March, as reported by MusicAlly). While this is only available in the U.S. for now, it marks another impressive step towards integrating new forms of content for fans to geek-out on. One could say this move also shows video giants like YouTube that Spotify can keep up with the demand.

Outside the realm of traditional music videos, this will be exclusive video content from various artists aimed at engaging fans in a less traditional manner: Spotify claims fans will be able to see everything “from 2 Chainz visiting Dr. Miami to assist him with a butt-lift surgery to Sza hanging out in the woods and talking about her rise to fame, or Wale getting a gourmet meal from a five-star weed chef”.

As this feature is sure to be rolled out further in the coming year, independent artists can see this continued commitment to playlisting as a positive. Getting placed on a playlist can be a powerful way to market your music to new fans, and the opportunity to include video content down the road only sweetens the deal. TuneCore always offers artists the opportunity to be considered for feature placements (with no guarantees, of course), and this facet of marketing and promotion should be implemented into their upcoming releases.

 

Nielsen Report Shows Interesting Millennial Music Consumption Trends


Tired of reading reports and headlines about how ‘millennials’ are eating, drinking, ruining industries, and interacting with the world around them? Too bad! But hey, at least this recent report by Nielsen actually pertains to folks – millennial or otherwise – making music and distributing to digital platforms.

Millennial music fans display “Lots of Love, Lack of Loyalty”, Nielsen says. The report touches on a lot, but when it comes to music, it appears as though fans in the 18-34 range are using multiple platforms to tune in with little regard for the brands fueling them. 57% of millennials are using two or more apps to stream music, compared to only 39% of those streamers over the age 35.

While it’s commonplace to bemoan the decline of terrestrial (and even digital) radio listening among this generation, figures around how much radio they’re dialed into have barely dropped since last year (10 hours and 14 minutes per week down from 11 hours and 17 minutes per week). An interesting thing to note, though, is that millennials are “21%more likely to frequently choose songs than to let the music play without making changes” – an obviously different listening experience from what broadcast radio offers.

As mentioned above – if you’re an artist distributing to popular streaming platforms, this is some must-read stuff. The report concludes that loyalty to platforms aside, “the reality of today’s media scenario is that the addition of new offerings has actually inspired increased consumption.”

 

YouTube Begins Offering In-App Messaging & Sharing


Tired of reading what those animals in the YouTube video comment sections have to say? Yeah, we all are. The good news is that YouTube has launched an exciting new way for fans to share their favorite content with their friends and chat about it without ever leaving the app. As streaming services like Spotify scale back their messaging offerings, YouTube hopes to inspire more sharing, discovering and private conversation while keeping folks in-app.

YouTube Product Manager Benoit de Boursetty says, “We think it’ll make sharing easier, faster and more fun on your phone… These shared videos all live in a brand new tab on your YouTube mobile app, making it easier than ever to catch up on videos your friends have shared or to show them a few of your own favourites.”

The demand for music on YouTube continues, and thankfully independent artists are offered a way to not only distribute properly but also collect sound recording revenue from the Google-owned giant. It’s not hard to believe that we’ll see a spike in sharing among dedicated users who might shy away from music-first platforms such as Apple Music, Deezer or Spotify. As an app that attracts less-than-active music listeners at higher rates, YouTube’s new features stand to make it a friendlier place for artists to share their new releases.

iHeartRadio Expands Services For Users

Hot on the heels of announcing 100 million registered users, iHeartRadio recently released their newest services, iHeartRadio Plus and iHeartRadio All Access (powered by Napster) and we’re excited to announce that these services are now available for TuneCore Artists to distribute their music to!

iHeartRadio already offers listeners access to over 750 live streams of radio stations across the U.S., as well as the ability to build a playlist or ‘user-generated’ radio station based on an artist of their choosing. Here’s a look at how the new services stand to impact users and artists:

  • With iHeartRadio Plus, users will have access to offline listening, unlimited skips and replays, and customized radio stations for $4.99/month;
  • With iHeartRadio All Access, users get a traditional on-demand streaming platform complete with a catalog millions of songs (via Napster) for $9.99/month.
  • For TuneCore Artists, both of these new services open up the opportunity for discovery and democratic listening among iHeartRadio subscribers!

What does that mean for TuneCore Artists who have already distributed to iHeartRadio and Napster?

Since your music is already on iHeartRadio and Napster (fka Rhapsody), you’re good! You do not need to take any action to make your current active releases available on iHeartRadio Plus or iHeartRadio All Access. Any fans who search for your release(s) on iHeartRadio should be able to find them on both of these services.

For information about getting your music on iHeartRadio, learn more here.

To add your current active releases to iHeartRadio and/or Napster, head over to your Store Manager.

TuneCore Artists know they can always look to us to offer them a plethora of stores and streaming services to send their new releases to. We know that independent music is something that fans seek globally, and we strive to make sure that artists can take advantage of all available outlets in order to build their fan base.

This is a big step for iHeartRadio and their listeners, and we’re excited about what this means for our artists moving forward.

December Industry Wrap-Up

By Hugh McIntyre

2016 has finally come to a close (or it will relatively soon, thankfully), but we’re not done just yet. December is always the busiest month for everybody, and the same is doubly true for the music industry. The biggest albums are released, year-end lists begin rolling out, the Grammy nominations are announced, and everybody starts gearing up for a new year. This December was no different, and there was quite a lot going on.

  • Drake was the most popular artist on pretty much every streaming platform there is, and it wasn’t even close;
  • Artists being played on the radio might soon see their royalty checks dwindle;
  • A classical composer who has been dead for a century nabbed the title of the best-selling CD of 2016; and
  • We all love Facebook…except the music industry and indie musicians, that is.

Drake ran all of streaming by an enormous margin in 2016


It should come as no surprise that Drake was the most-streamed artist of 2016, with almost no differentiation between the major players in streaming.

The hip-hop star was the most-played on Spotify and Apple Music, and the most-thumbed on Pandora (meaning more people liked his songs than any others). His album Views and his songs “One Dance” and his collaborative hit with Rihanna, “Work,” helped his name appear at the top of essentially every ranking.

Drake himself saw his music played close to five billion times on Spotify alone, and Views just recently became the first album on Apple Music to see its songs streamed at least one billion times. Spotify, which has five times the users as Apple’s relatively new entrant to the streaming market (100 million vs. 20 million), padded the rapper’s wallet even more. Just about a week or so ago, “One Dance” became the first to reach the one billion milestone on Spotify, becoming the first of what will surely be many.

The only places on the web where Drake didn’t seem to rule were on video platforms. He was not among the most popular acts on sites like YouTube and Vevo, which was because his album Views and the singles released off of it didn’t have promotional strategies based on videos for the most part.

While not everybody can rack up as many plays as Drake and his friends, the number of songs being streamed in the U.S. every year is growing rapidly, and that benefits everyone. Nielsen reports that by the time the year has concluded, over 250 billion (yes, that’s billion with a b) tracks will have been streamed in America, which represents a 77% increase from 2015. With more and more people signing up every day, that number should continue to climb by at least another 50% in 2017.

Radio stations are looking to pay songwriters even less


The radio industry is notorious for low payout rates, and ones that only benefit some artists, and it still isn’t satisfied with that fact.

A committee combining the powerful forces of 10,000 radio stations across the United States has launched a lawsuit against Global Rights Music (GMR), a performance rights organization that is tasked with collecting royalties from people and companies that play the music of its artists, and with working to slowly, but steadily, raise the amount paid for those broadcasts.

This action, while despicable to artists of all kinds and at all points in their careers, is nothing new. For decades now, the radio industry has fought to lower the amount of money it needs to pay when songs are broadcast to listeners. Every so often, there seems to be some new all-important reason why the business of radio deserves to put more money in its own pockets, or why artists are being overpaid.

While the industry’s reasons change from effort to effort (and this time it’s something a bit too technical to actually be relevant or important to most people, and it seems like a real grab), the fact that radio needs music much more than the opposite remains irreversibly true. If every major artist pulled their catalog for use on commercial radio, people would find other ways to listen to tunes, while the business would go under. Radio argues that it provides valuable promotion to artists and record labels, which makes them money, but does that mean the entire industry should continuously be allowed to pay less and less for the same performances?

The radio industry doesn’t often win in these cases, or at least not by too much, so hopefully this latest legal assault won’t pan out, and artists will still be paid the fractions they earn now.

The best-selling CD of 2016 is shocking, while the best-selling albums are not


It might sound too crazy to be true, but the artist that managed to sell the most CDs from one collection is none other than Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. The composer, who certainly wasn’t around to do any promotion or tour on the new item sold under his name, released a new box set in 2016, and his super fans snapped it up.

Mozart 225, a celebration of essentially everything he ever wrote for his 225th birthday, is a 200-CD box set that retailed for under $350 on Amazon, making it a serious steal. The label behind this project, Decca, wasted no time in sharing the news that it had nabbed the best-selling CD of the year, which is technically true…at least in some respects. The box set only moved about 7,000 copies, but when one considers that there are 200 CDs per box, that adds up to about 1.3 million shifted, which is rather impressive in 2016.

Having said that, Mozart 225 is only available on CD, so it lost out to more current stars when other forms of albums are added into the mix. Drake, Beyoncé, Adele, and Rihanna all moved more albums (or album projects when streaming is taken into account), and people bought their CDs too!

CDs as a category took another hit in 2016, but millions of people around the world still want to own the music they love in physical form, and they are willing to pay. Those artists working in genres that cater to audiences that like to buy music, especially in physical mediums such as classical, should not be swayed from making these products for fans to buy.

Facebook is clashing with the music industry in major ways


Social media giant Facebook has long been a leader when it comes to many technological advancements, from connecting with friends and family around the world to messaging to online gaming, but when music is concerned, the world’s most popular social channel is playing catch up, and things do not appear to be going well.

The company started integrating music and music videos in a major way not too long ago, and while that sounds like it should be a good thing for everybody involved, the music industry has banded together for the most part, and it is not thrilled.

Licensing deals have not been signed with the major labels, and advertising does not exist in the same way as on sites like YouTube or Vevo, so the money isn’t flowing as it should. This means that artists of many sizes, especially those towards the bottom in terms of popularity and those trading in covers, aren’t earning money on their works, even though Facebook can collect cash on ads placed not necessarily on the videos themselves, but on other pages on the website.

Because Facebook isn’t yet paying for using music (which already seems like a ridiculous sentence), takedown notices are pouring in as they used to on YouTube before advertising models caught up with the way people were uploading tunes. This is bad for anybody trying to promote their music, or themselves, on the platform, and it’s sadly not going to change until the industry can force Facebook to start paying for the music it is using. The social channel could, and hopefully will be, a powerful tool for promotion and a source of revenue, but that may need to wait until next year.

Rdio Announces Addition of 500 Terrestrial Radio Stations

Rdio, the subscription streaming service and mobile app, has announced the introduction of live broadcasts from over 500 terrestrial radio stations. That’s good news for fans of radio, who can now listen live to both local and popular stations wherever they are.

This exciting announcement has been in the works for almost two years, since Rdio and Cumulus Media (owner of 525 radio stations) struck a deal in September of 2013.

Subscribers of Rdio will now have access to live radio stations that have been curated and offered to them based on their music taste. Rdio  has also unleashed options for users who want to establish a more interactive relationship with the stations they love: if a user hears a song they like, they can use Rdio’s interface and metadata to favorite, download and listen later offline!

“There [are] still tons of people out there that are listening to music every week that haven’t used any streaming service,” says Chris Becherer, Rdio’s senior vice president for product. “Our goal is to try to bridge that audience.”

So what does this mean for TuneCore Artists? Well, if you haven’t already, add your releases to Rdio! Fans who want a more interactive mobile experience when it comes to listening to their favorite terrestrial radio stations while simultaneously having access to a library of their favorite albums available for streaming are sure to increase Rdio’s subscriber base. Why not make your music available to them? Add your songs today.