Facebook Live and Tips For Indie Artists

[Editors Note: This article was written by Michelle Aguilar.]

 

Ever notice how the energy of a conversation – particularly about music – spikes up as soon as the word “live” comes up? Seeing an artist live is almost like saying you went to a party and bumped into them.

You actually saw them…in real life.

People like to get as close as they can to whatever it is that they’re interested in – they want to learn more about it, and of course learn as much as they can about it now. Facebook has done a pretty good job at providing a platform that allows people to engage in this way by creating Facebook Live.

As a matter of fact, according to Facebook, users watch Facebook live videos three-times longer than videos that aren’t live. This means that users are more interested in things happening now. Now let’s go over some of the basics starting with what Facebook Live is for those who aren’t familiar.

What is Facebook Live?

Facebook Live is a live video streaming feature that allows people, public figures and pages share live video with their friends and followers.

Facebook Live Features

  • Pin live comments to highlight great comments for your viewers
  • Add permalinks to your videos. (A permalink is a link to an individual page.)
  • Crosspost after your live session has ended. You can publish the video to multiple pages at once.

Where is Facebook Live Published?

It is published to the page or profile and can be removed at any time. They are more likely to appear higher in News Feed when the videos are live. Fans and friends will be able to view it at anytime.

What is the maximum duration?

Live broadcasts can last up to 90 minutes.

What are the technical requirements?

You need a strong signal before going live. Use WiFi. If you can’t find a nearby network, you’ll want a 4G connection. To check your internet speed ahead of time, download the Speedtest app from the App Store or Google Play.

Different Ways to Use Facebook Live

Q&A with Fans

By doing a Q&A you are communicating that you are open and interested in your audience. The more you share about yourself, the more they’ll grow to appreciate your art.

It is through sharing that your individuality and personality surfaces, and audiences always want to know what goes on behind your performances, (such as your lifestyle, habits, current projects, life experiences and more).

Song Requests

During your live session, accept as many song requests as you’d like. Song requests are always fun and it demonstrates a playful form of engagement with your audience. This kind of attention to your audience will go a long way. It will create a more meaningful and intimate dynamic between you and your fans.

Rehearsals

Firstly, you’re already killing two birds with one stone: you’re practicing and you’re recording it for your viewers. People love the element of exclusivity and deeper look by getting a “behind-the-scenes” view.

Announcements

This is a great way to make an announcement as it brings a more serious and urgent tone to your message. There’s a huge difference in impact between making announcements live, versus posting a social media update or graphic.

By making yourself this directly available to your audience, you are attributing a more urgent and exciting tone to your message. At the end of the session, you could even give your live viewers a special discount. Let them know you appreciate them and they’ll naturally keep wanting to engage.

Facebook Live broadcasts can even be seen in a similar light to the Facetime tool on the iPhone. It is a closer, more intimate form of interaction. You are no longer interacting with a screen full of words or still-images. The subject of interest is engaging directly and attentively with you, the fan…and how awesome is that?

Doing a Facebook Live session may seem a little daunting and risky at first – and it can be. There is no time to edit, or re-enact or enact anything.

But it makes the interaction that much more real and meaningful – something that will go a long way for you as a developing artist.